Julio Blas

Summary

Affiliation: University of Saskatchewan
Country: Canada

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Age-related variation in the adrenocortical response to stress in nestling white storks (Ciconia ciconia) supports the developmental hypothesis
    Julio Blas
    Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Sask, Canada S7N 5E2
    Gen Comp Endocrinol 148:172-80. 2006
  2. pmc Testosterone increases bioavailability of carotenoids: insights into the honesty of sexual signaling
    J Blas
    Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, 112 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5E2
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:18633-7. 2006
  3. pmc Stress response during development predicts fitness in a wild, long lived vertebrate
    J Blas
    Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, 112 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5E2
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:8880-4. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Skeletal pathology in white storks (Ciconia ciconia) associated with heavy metal contamination in southwestern Spain
    Judit E G Smits
    Department of Veterinary Pathology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5B4, Canada
    Toxicol Pathol 33:441-8. 2005
  5. doi request reprint Tracking stress: localisation, deposition and stability of corticosterone in feathers
    Gary R Bortolotti
    Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada S7N 5E2
    J Exp Biol 212:1477-82. 2009
  6. pmc Adrenocortical response to stress and thyroid hormone status in free-living nestling white storks (Ciconia ciconia) exposed to heavy metal and arsenic contamination
    Raquel Baos
    Department of Applied Biology, Estacion Biologica de Donana, Sevilla, Spain
    Environ Health Perspect 114:1497-501. 2006
  7. ncbi request reprint Physiological stress levels predict survival probabilities in wild rabbits
    Sonia Cabezas
    Department of Applied Biology, Estacion Biologica de Donana, Spanish Council for Scientific Research CSIC, Avenida María Luisa s n E 41013, Sevilla, Spain
    Horm Behav 51:313-20. 2007
  8. doi request reprint Cell-mediated immune activation rapidly decreases plasma carotenoids but does not affect oxidative stress in red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa)
    Lorenzo Perez-Rodriguez
    Instituto de Investigacion en Recursos Cinegeticos, CSIC, UCLM, JCCM, Ciudad Real, Spain
    J Exp Biol 211:2155-61. 2008

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications8

  1. ncbi request reprint Age-related variation in the adrenocortical response to stress in nestling white storks (Ciconia ciconia) supports the developmental hypothesis
    Julio Blas
    Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Sask, Canada S7N 5E2
    Gen Comp Endocrinol 148:172-80. 2006
    ..e., weather conditions, dietary restrictions, and social competition) are discussed according to developmental changes in behavioral and physiological abilities...
  2. pmc Testosterone increases bioavailability of carotenoids: insights into the honesty of sexual signaling
    J Blas
    Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, 112 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5E2
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:18633-7. 2006
    ....
  3. pmc Stress response during development predicts fitness in a wild, long lived vertebrate
    J Blas
    Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, 112 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5E2
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:8880-4. 2007
    ..Increased fitness among low GC responders, having a proactive personality, is predicted under elevated population density and availability of food resources, conditions that characterize our study population...
  4. ncbi request reprint Skeletal pathology in white storks (Ciconia ciconia) associated with heavy metal contamination in southwestern Spain
    Judit E G Smits
    Department of Veterinary Pathology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5B4, Canada
    Toxicol Pathol 33:441-8. 2005
    ..Bone malformations, measured by leg asymmetry, was only partially explained by bone metals, indicating that a combination of factors was involved with the abnormal development in these young storks...
  5. doi request reprint Tracking stress: localisation, deposition and stability of corticosterone in feathers
    Gary R Bortolotti
    Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada S7N 5E2
    J Exp Biol 212:1477-82. 2009
    ..The ability to track stress over time allows for new questions to be asked about the health and ecology of birds and their environment...
  6. pmc Adrenocortical response to stress and thyroid hormone status in free-living nestling white storks (Ciconia ciconia) exposed to heavy metal and arsenic contamination
    Raquel Baos
    Department of Applied Biology, Estacion Biologica de Donana, Sevilla, Spain
    Environ Health Perspect 114:1497-501. 2006
    ..In this study we examined the adrenocortical stress response and thyroid hormone status in free-living nestling white storks (Ciconia ciconia) in relation to heavy metals (zinc, lead, copper, cadmium) and arsenic levels in blood...
  7. ncbi request reprint Physiological stress levels predict survival probabilities in wild rabbits
    Sonia Cabezas
    Department of Applied Biology, Estacion Biologica de Donana, Spanish Council for Scientific Research CSIC, Avenida María Luisa s n E 41013, Sevilla, Spain
    Horm Behav 51:313-20. 2007
    ..Our results suggest that the cost of maintaining elevated corticosterone levels in terms of decreased body condition is balanced by the increased chance of survival upon release...
  8. doi request reprint Cell-mediated immune activation rapidly decreases plasma carotenoids but does not affect oxidative stress in red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa)
    Lorenzo Perez-Rodriguez
    Instituto de Investigacion en Recursos Cinegeticos, CSIC, UCLM, JCCM, Ciudad Real, Spain
    J Exp Biol 211:2155-61. 2008
    ..Alternative mechanisms linking carotenoids to immunity (not necessarily relying on the use of these pigments as antioxidants) should be considered in future studies on birds...