B G Amsden

Summary

Affiliation: Queen's University
Country: Canada

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Osmotically driven protein release from photo-cross-linked elastomers of poly(trimethylene carbonate) and poly(trimethylene carbonate-co-d,l-lactide)
    R Chapanian
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
    Eur J Pharm Biopharm 74:172-83. 2010
  2. doi request reprint Anti-atherosclerotic peptide delivery from a photocrosslinkable biodegradable network
    Brian Amsden
    Department of Chemical Engineering and Human Mobility Research Centre, Queen s University, 19 Division St, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
    Int J Pharm 388:32-9. 2010
  3. doi request reprint VEGF-induced angiogenesis following localized delivery via injectable, low viscosity poly(trimethylene carbonate)
    Brian G Amsden
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
    J Control Release 145:109-15. 2010
  4. doi request reprint Biodegradable elastomers in drug delivery
    Brian G Amsden
    Queen s University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
    Expert Opin Drug Deliv 5:175-87. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint Methacrylated glycol chitosan as a photopolymerizable biomaterial
    Brian G Amsden
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, K7L 3N6
    Biomacromolecules 8:3758-66. 2007
  6. ncbi request reprint Review of osmotic pressure driven release of proteins from monolithic devices
    Brian Amsden
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, ON, Canada
    J Pharm Pharm Sci 10:129-43. 2007
  7. ncbi request reprint Synthesis and characterization of biodegradable networks providing saturated-solution prolonged delivery
    Brian Amsden
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
    J Pharm Sci 97:860-74. 2008
  8. doi request reprint Liquid, injectable, hydrophobic and biodegradable polymers as drug delivery vehicles
    Brian G Amsden
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
    Macromol Biosci 10:825-35. 2010
  9. doi request reprint Delivery approaches for angiogenic growth factors in the treatment of ischemic conditions
    Brian G Amsden
    Queen s University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6, Canada
    Expert Opin Drug Deliv 8:873-90. 2011
  10. doi request reprint Combined and sequential delivery of bioactive VEGF165 and HGF from poly(trimethylene carbonate) based photo-cross-linked elastomers
    R Chapanian
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
    J Control Release 143:53-63. 2010

Collaborators

  • A J Daugulis
  • Z Zhou
  • S D Waldman
  • R Chapanian
  • Rafi Chapanian
  • Bernadette G Ilagan
  • Stephen C Pang
  • L A Cornacchione
  • A J McGregor
  • James W S Hayami
  • Husam M Younes
  • M Yat Tse
  • Laurianne Timbart
  • Darryl K Knight
  • Frank Gu
  • B Qi
  • J Bianco
  • Man Y Tse
  • Denver C Surrao
  • Oladunni Babasola
  • Stephen N Shapka
  • Ronald J Neufeld
  • Ayman O S El-Kadi

Detail Information

Publications25

  1. doi request reprint Osmotically driven protein release from photo-cross-linked elastomers of poly(trimethylene carbonate) and poly(trimethylene carbonate-co-d,l-lactide)
    R Chapanian
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
    Eur J Pharm Biopharm 74:172-83. 2010
    ..No significant reduction in the microenvironmental pH occurred after 17days of release. TMC elastomers copolymerized with small amounts of DLLA are potential candidates for the localized delivery of acid-sensitive proteins...
  2. doi request reprint Anti-atherosclerotic peptide delivery from a photocrosslinkable biodegradable network
    Brian Amsden
    Department of Chemical Engineering and Human Mobility Research Centre, Queen s University, 19 Division St, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
    Int J Pharm 388:32-9. 2010
    ..This formulation provides a means of achieving a desirable release rate from a degradable, water-swellable network through selection of ASCP molecular weight and DLPEGDLDA composition...
  3. doi request reprint VEGF-induced angiogenesis following localized delivery via injectable, low viscosity poly(trimethylene carbonate)
    Brian G Amsden
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
    J Control Release 145:109-15. 2010
    ..This formulation approach, of using a low viscosity polymer delivery vehicle, is potentially useful for localized delivery of acid-sensitive proteins, such as VEGF...
  4. doi request reprint Biodegradable elastomers in drug delivery
    Brian G Amsden
    Queen s University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
    Expert Opin Drug Deliv 5:175-87. 2008
    ..Biodegradable elastomers have been used in many different manners for controlled drug delivery. The development of new biodegradable elastomers has recently increased, driven mainly by tissue engineering research...
  5. ncbi request reprint Methacrylated glycol chitosan as a photopolymerizable biomaterial
    Brian G Amsden
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, K7L 3N6
    Biomacromolecules 8:3758-66. 2007
    ..The hydrogels degraded slowly in vitro in the presence of lysozyme at a rate that increased as the cross-link density of the gels decreased...
  6. ncbi request reprint Review of osmotic pressure driven release of proteins from monolithic devices
    Brian Amsden
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, ON, Canada
    J Pharm Pharm Sci 10:129-43. 2007
    ..It is concluded that osmotic pressure driven release is promising for protein delivery, but there is still a need for in vivo demonstration of protein stability and delivery efficacy...
  7. ncbi request reprint Synthesis and characterization of biodegradable networks providing saturated-solution prolonged delivery
    Brian Amsden
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
    J Pharm Sci 97:860-74. 2008
    ..This release behavior is explained as a balance between agent dissolution in the swollen polymer matrix and diffusion through the polymer matrix bulk...
  8. doi request reprint Liquid, injectable, hydrophobic and biodegradable polymers as drug delivery vehicles
    Brian G Amsden
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
    Macromol Biosci 10:825-35. 2010
    ....
  9. doi request reprint Delivery approaches for angiogenic growth factors in the treatment of ischemic conditions
    Brian G Amsden
    Queen s University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6, Canada
    Expert Opin Drug Deliv 8:873-90. 2011
    ..Therapeutic angiogenesis, that is, the growth and remodeling of new blood vessels from pre-existing blood vessels to the ischemic area, is a promising solution to this problem...
  10. doi request reprint Combined and sequential delivery of bioactive VEGF165 and HGF from poly(trimethylene carbonate) based photo-cross-linked elastomers
    R Chapanian
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
    J Control Release 143:53-63. 2010
    ..This study demonstrates the potential of TMC-based elastomers combined with an osmotic mechanism to release acid-sensitive growth factors in bioactive form alone and in combination, in controlled rates and sequences...
  11. ncbi request reprint In vivo degradation behavior of photo-cross-linked star-poly(epsilon-caprolactone-co-D,L-lactide) elastomers
    Brian G Amsden
    Departments of Chemical Engineering and of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
    Biomacromolecules 7:365-72. 2006
    ..The elastomers were well tolerated by the rats over the 12 week period in vivo...
  12. doi request reprint Design and characterization of a biodegradable composite scaffold for ligament tissue engineering
    James W S Hayami
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Canada
    J Biomed Mater Res A 92:1407-20. 2010
    ..On the basis of these results, it was determined that the composite scaffold design was a viable alternative to the current approaches used for ligament tissue engineering and merits further study...
  13. ncbi request reprint Sustained interferon-gamma delivery from a photocrosslinked biodegradable elastomer
    Frank Gu
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6
    J Control Release 102:607-17. 2005
    ..This delivery formulation may be clinically useful for sustained, local protein drug delivery applications...
  14. ncbi request reprint Delivery of benzene to Alcaligenes xylosoxidans by solid polymers in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor
    Andrew J Daugulis
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, K7L 3N6
    Biotechnol Lett 25:1203-7. 2003
    ..The capacity of these polymers for benzene, and benzene diffusivity within the polymers were also determined...
  15. ncbi request reprint Synthesis and characterization of a photo-cross-linked biodegradable elastomer
    Brian G Amsden
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, K7L 3N6
    Biomacromolecules 5:2479-86. 2004
    ..Over a degradation period of 12 weeks in phosphate buffered saline, the elastomers exhibited little mass loss, appreciable mechanical strength loss, and little dimensional or strain at break change...
  16. doi request reprint The role of oxidation and enzymatic hydrolysis on the in vivo degradation of trimethylene carbonate based photocrosslinkable elastomers
    Rafi Chapanian
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, 19 Division Street, Dupuis Hall, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6, Canada
    Biomaterials 30:295-306. 2009
    ....
  17. doi request reprint Surface modifications of photocrosslinked biodegradable elastomers and their influence on smooth muscle cell adhesion and proliferation
    Bernadette G Ilagan
    Department of Chemical Engineering and Human Mobility Research Centre, Queen s University, Kingston, Ont, Canada K7L 3N6
    Acta Biomater 5:2429-40. 2009
    ....
  18. doi request reprint Low viscosity poly(trimethylene carbonate) for localized drug delivery: rheological properties and in vivo degradation
    Laurianne Timbart
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Ontario, Canada
    Macromol Biosci 9:786-94. 2009
    ....
  19. doi request reprint Photo-cross-linked poly(ethylene carbonate) elastomers: synthesis, in vivo degradation, and determination of in vivo degradation mechanism
    L A Cornacchione
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, ON, Canada
    Biomacromolecules 13:3099-107. 2012
    ....
  20. doi request reprint Macroporous photocrosslinked elastomer scaffolds containing microposity: preparation and in vitro degradation properties
    Bernadette G Ilagan
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
    J Biomed Mater Res A 93:211-8. 2010
    ..The modulus and stress at break of the scaffolds decreased continuously during degradation while the strain at break remained constant. These scaffolds show potential for use in the engineering of soft tissues...
  21. doi request reprint Long term in vivo degradation and tissue response to photo-cross-linked elastomers prepared from star-shaped prepolymers of poly(epsilon-caprolactone-co-D,L-lactide)
    Rafi Chapanian
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
    J Biomed Mater Res A 92:830-42. 2010
    ..Aminor host reaction with minimal vascularity and inflammation was invoked, with a milder tissue response observed with more highly crosslinked cylinders...
  22. doi request reprint Chondrocyte repopulation of the zone of death induced by osteochondral harvest
    A J McGregor
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
    Osteoarthritis Cartilage 19:242-8. 2011
    ..The purpose of this study was to repopulate the induced ZCD through the combined effects of collagenase treatment and delivery of a chemotactic agent...
  23. ncbi request reprint Structure, depolymerization, and cytocompatibility evaluation of glycol chitosan
    Darryl K Knight
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
    J Biomed Mater Res A 83:787-98. 2007
    ..When assessed in vitro for cytocompatibility, the polymer exhibited no toxicity on monolayer-cultured chondrocytes, and in fact stimulated cell growth at low concentrations...
  24. ncbi request reprint Degradation of xenobiotics in a partitioning bioreactor in which the partitioning phase is a polymer
    Brian G Amsden
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
    Biotechnol Bioeng 84:399-405. 2003
    ..This work has opened the possibility of using widely mixed cultures in TPPB systems without concern for degradation of the delivery material and without concern of contamination...
  25. ncbi request reprint Interferon-gamma therapy: evaluation of routes of administration and delivery systems
    Husam M Younes
    Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2N8, Canada
    J Pharm Sci 91:2-17. 2002
    ..A critical discussion covering the advantages and limitations of the currently used methodologies to deliver IFN-gamma in such a fashion is presented...