M D Rutherford

Summary

Affiliation: McMaster University
Country: Canada

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Cognitive underpinnings of pretend play in autism
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado, USA
    J Autism Dev Disord 33:289-302. 2003
  2. doi request reprint IQ predicts biological motion perception in autism spectrum disorders
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada
    J Autism Dev Disord 42:557-65. 2012
  3. doi request reprint Fathers show modifications of infant-directed action similar to that of mothers
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience, and Behavior, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4K1
    J Exp Child Psychol 111:367-78. 2012
  4. doi request reprint Evidence of a divided-attention advantage in autism
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    Cogn Neuropsychol 24:505-15. 2007
  5. doi request reprint Eye direction, not movement direction, predicts attention shifts in those with autism spectrum disorders
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1
    J Autism Dev Disord 38:1958-65. 2008
  6. doi request reprint Scan path differences and similarities during emotion perception in those with and without autism spectrum disorders
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, Canada, L8S 4K1
    J Autism Dev Disord 38:1371-81. 2008
  7. doi request reprint The use of aftereffects in the study of relationships among emotion categories
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 34:27-40. 2008
  8. ncbi request reprint Differences in discrimination of eye and mouth displacement in autism spectrum disorders
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1
    Vision Res 47:2099-110. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint A longitudinal study of pretend play in autism
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, Canada, L8S 4K1
    J Autism Dev Disord 37:1024-39. 2007
  10. doi request reprint Visual afterimages of emotional faces in high functioning autism
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    J Autism Dev Disord 42:221-9. 2012

Detail Information

Publications26

  1. ncbi request reprint Cognitive underpinnings of pretend play in autism
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado, USA
    J Autism Dev Disord 33:289-302. 2003
    ..They also had significant deficits in our ToM measure, but not our EF measures. Regression analyses suggested a role for our measure of generativity, one of the EF measures...
  2. doi request reprint IQ predicts biological motion perception in autism spectrum disorders
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada
    J Autism Dev Disord 42:557-65. 2012
    ..There were no group differences in sensitivity to biological motion or the ability to identify the direction of motion. Possible explanations are discussed, including the possible use of compensatory strategies in high IQ ASD...
  3. doi request reprint Fathers show modifications of infant-directed action similar to that of mothers
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience, and Behavior, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4K1
    J Exp Child Psychol 111:367-78. 2012
    ..These results provide evidence that fathers show modifications in their infant-directed action that is similar to that of mothers...
  4. doi request reprint Evidence of a divided-attention advantage in autism
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    Cogn Neuropsychol 24:505-15. 2007
    ..These results stand in stark contrast to the predictions of some prevalent theories of visual and cognitive processing in autism...
  5. doi request reprint Eye direction, not movement direction, predicts attention shifts in those with autism spectrum disorders
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1
    J Autism Dev Disord 38:1958-65. 2008
    ..Reflexive attention shifts in both groups followed terminal eye direction, rather than direction of movement...
  6. doi request reprint Scan path differences and similarities during emotion perception in those with and without autism spectrum disorders
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, Canada, L8S 4K1
    J Autism Dev Disord 38:1371-81. 2008
    ..However, those with ASD looked at the eyes less than the control group when viewing complex emotions...
  7. doi request reprint The use of aftereffects in the study of relationships among emotion categories
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 34:27-40. 2008
    ..This suggests an asymmetric relationship among categories. Experiments 4-7 explored the mechanism driving this effect. The evolutionary and functional explanations for the category asymmetry are discussed...
  8. ncbi request reprint Differences in discrimination of eye and mouth displacement in autism spectrum disorders
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1
    Vision Res 47:2099-110. 2007
    ..These results suggests that typical individuals are better able to make use of information in the eyes than some individuals with ASD, but that there is no clear autism "advantage" in the use of information in the mouth region...
  9. ncbi request reprint A longitudinal study of pretend play in autism
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, Canada, L8S 4K1
    J Autism Dev Disord 37:1024-39. 2007
    ..1 months). Children with autism were profoundly delayed given both competence (prompted) measures as well as performance (spontaneous) measures. Joint attention at time 1 strongly and uniquely predicted pretend play development...
  10. doi request reprint Visual afterimages of emotional faces in high functioning autism
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    J Autism Dev Disord 42:221-9. 2012
    ..This study was the first to provide evidence of visual aftereffects in ASD and suggests a different psychological organization among emotions in those with ASD...
  11. ncbi request reprint The effect of social role on theory of mind reasoning
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Br J Psychol 95:91-103. 2004
    ..That performance on theory of mind tasks can vary independently of performance on matched control tasks is consistent with the idea that ToM reasoning can change as a result of a change in social status...
  12. ncbi request reprint A retrospective journal-based case study of an infant with autism and his twin
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, McMasterUniversity, Hamilton, ON, Canada
    Neurocase 11:129-37. 2005
    ..This rare opportunity to view early autistic development gives direction to developmental theories of autism and clinically useful cues to early signs of autism...
  13. ncbi request reprint Rules versus prototype matching: strategies of perception of emotional facial expressions in the autism spectrum
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Psychology, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street, West Hamilton, ON L8S 4L8, USA
    J Autism Dev Disord 37:187-96. 2007
    ..People with ASD appear to rely more heavily on a rule-based strategy than a template-based strategy in perceiving emotional facial expressions...
  14. ncbi request reprint The perception of animacy in young children with autism
    M D Rutherford
    McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1, Canada
    J Autism Dev Disord 36:983-92. 2006
    ..These results are discussed in terms of the social orienting theory of autism, and the possibility that animacy perception might be preserved in autism, even if it is not used automatically...
  15. ncbi request reprint The 'Reading the Mind in the Voice' test-revised: a study of complex emotion recognition in adults with and without autism spectrum conditions
    Ofer Golan
    Department of Psychiatry, Autism Research Centre, Cambridge University, Douglas House, 18b Trumpington Road, CB2 2AH, Cambridge, UK
    J Autism Dev Disord 37:1096-106. 2007
    ..Verbal IQ was positively correlated with performance, and females performed worse than males in the AS/HFA group. Results are discussed with regard to multi modal empathizing deficits in autism spectrum conditions (ASC)...
  16. doi request reprint Categorical perception of emotional facial expressions in preschoolers
    Jenna L Cheal
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience, and Behavior, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4K1
    J Exp Child Psychol 110:434-43. 2011
    ..5-year-olds perceive happy and sad emotional facial expressions categorically as adults do. Categorizing emotional expressions is advantageous for children if it allows them to use social information faster and more efficiently...
  17. doi request reprint Individuals with autism can categorize facial expressions
    Michelle Homer
    Department of Psychology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    Child Neuropsychol 14:419-37. 2008
    ..As this result is inconsistent with findings from other studies of categorical perception in individuals with autism, possible explanations for these findings are discussed...
  18. doi request reprint A threat-detection advantage in those with autism spectrum disorders
    Kristen M Krysko
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, Canada
    Brain Cogn 69:472-80. 2009
    ..Participants with ASD showed similar reaction time, but decreased overall accuracy compared to controls. This provides evidence for less robust, but intact or learned implicit processing of basic emotions in ASD...
  19. ncbi request reprint Reading-related habitual eye movements produce a directional anisotropy in the perception of speed and animacy
    Paul A Szego
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada
    Perception 37:1609-11. 2008
    ..These results suggest that the highly practiced eye movements involved in reading are associated with the presence or absence of a directional anisotropy for speed and animacy...
  20. ncbi request reprint Reading the mind in the voice: a study with normal adults and adults with Asperger syndrome and high functioning autism
    M D Rutherford
    Department of Experimental Psychology, Autism Research Centre, University of Cambridge, UK
    J Autism Dev Disord 32:189-94. 2002
    ..These results are consistent with previous results suggesting that people with HFA and AS have difficulties drawing ToM inferences...
  21. ncbi request reprint Context-dependent categorical perception of surprise
    Jenna L Cheal
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada
    Perception 42:294-301. 2013
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Actual and illusory differences in constant speed influence the perception of animacy similarly
    Paul A Szego
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    J Vis 7:5.1-7. 2007
    ..Together, these results suggest that our perceptions of animacy are influenced by constant speed differences, and that the perceptual association of speed and animacy is influenced by actual and illusory speed differences similarly...
  23. ncbi request reprint Recognition of novel faces after single exposure is enhanced during pregnancy
    Marla V Anderson
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada
    Evol Psychol 9:47-60. 2011
    ..In human evolutionary history, and today, males present a significant threat to females. Thus, enhanced recognition of faces, and especially male faces, during pregnancy may serve a protective function...
  24. ncbi request reprint Mapping emotion category boundaries using a visual expectation paradigm
    Jenna L Cheal
    Department of Psychology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1, Canada
    Perception 39:1514-25. 2010
    ..Results from two experiments suggest that this implicit method can be used to determine category boundaries, and that the boundaries found with this method are similar to those found with the keypress response...
  25. doi request reprint Afterimage induced neural activity during emotional face perception
    Jenna L Cheal
    Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1
    Brain Res 1549:11-21. 2014
    ..The re-entry of emotional information from other brain regions may be driving the emotional aftereffects and the N170 latency differences. ..
  26. ncbi request reprint Emotional responsivity in children with autism, children with other developmental disabilities, and children with typical development
    D J Scambler
    Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA
    J Autism Dev Disord 37:553-63. 2007
    ..Children with autism demonstrated muted changes in affect, but these responses occurred much less frequently than in comparison groups. The findings suggest directions for early identification and early treatment of autism...