Rhoda Sheryl Kagan

Summary

Affiliation: McGill University
Country: Canada

Publications

  1. pmc Food allergy: an overview
    Rhoda Sheryl Kagan
    Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Montreal Children s Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Environ Health Perspect 111:223-5. 2003
  2. ncbi request reprint The predictive value of a positive prick skin test to peanut in atopic, peanut-naïve children
    Rhoda Kagan
    Division of Allergy Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Montreal Children s Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 90:640-5. 2003
  3. ncbi request reprint Accidental ingestions in children with peanut allergy
    Joyce W Yu
    Division of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology, McGill University Health Centre, 1650 Cedar Avenue L10 413, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 118:466-72. 2006
  4. doi request reprint Role of food labels in accidental exposures in food-allergic individuals in Canada
    Shashank S Sheth
    Division of Clinical Immunology Allergy, Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 104:60-5. 2010
  5. doi request reprint Availability of the epinephrine autoinjector at school in children with peanut allergy
    Moshe Ben-Shoshan
    Division of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 100:570-5. 2008

Collaborators

  • A Clarke
  • Moshe Ben-Shoshan
  • Shashank S Sheth
  • Lawrence Joseph
  • Yvan St Pierre
  • Joyce W Yu
  • Susan Elliot
  • Mary Allen
  • Claire Dufresne
  • Laurie Harada
  • Marilyn Allen
  • Rebecca Wickett
  • Marie Noel Primeau
  • Samuel Benrejeb Godefroy
  • Susan Waserman
  • Reza Alizadehfar
  • Nina Verreault
  • Nathalie Nicolas

Detail Information

Publications5

  1. pmc Food allergy: an overview
    Rhoda Sheryl Kagan
    Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Montreal Children s Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Environ Health Perspect 111:223-5. 2003
    ..Presently, the only available treatment of food allergies is dietary vigilance and administration of self-injectable epinephrine...
  2. ncbi request reprint The predictive value of a positive prick skin test to peanut in atopic, peanut-naïve children
    Rhoda Kagan
    Division of Allergy Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Montreal Children s Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 90:640-5. 2003
    ..Children with positive PSTs are generally advised to avoid peanuts either indefinitely or until a definitive diagnosis is made through challenge...
  3. ncbi request reprint Accidental ingestions in children with peanut allergy
    Joyce W Yu
    Division of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology, McGill University Health Centre, 1650 Cedar Avenue L10 413, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    J Allergy Clin Immunol 118:466-72. 2006
    ..Accidental exposure to peanut has been reported to occur frequently. Total avoidance of peanut is difficult because of its widespread use, manufacturing and labeling errors, utensil contamination, and label misinterpretation...
  4. doi request reprint Role of food labels in accidental exposures in food-allergic individuals in Canada
    Shashank S Sheth
    Division of Clinical Immunology Allergy, Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 104:60-5. 2010
    ..Little is known about the impact of food labeling on the allergic consumer...
  5. doi request reprint Availability of the epinephrine autoinjector at school in children with peanut allergy
    Moshe Ben-Shoshan
    Division of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 100:570-5. 2008
    ..Delayed administration of epinephrine and the allergic individual's failure to personally carry epinephrine contribute to fatal outcomes...