Boris Worm

Summary

Affiliation: Dalhousie University
Country: Canada

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Impacts of biodiversity loss on ocean ecosystem services
    Boris Worm
    Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4J1
    Science 314:787-90. 2006
  2. pmc Global diversity hotspots and conservation priorities for sharks
    Luis O Lucifora
    Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Centro de Investigaciones Ecológicas Subtropicales, Centro de Investigaciones del Bosque Atlántico, Puerto Iguazú, Misiones, Argentina
    PLoS ONE 6:e19356. 2011
  3. ncbi request reprint The future of fish
    Boris Worm
    Biology Department, PO Box 15000, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, B3H 4R2, Canada
    Trends Ecol Evol 27:594-9. 2012
  4. ncbi request reprint Rebuilding global fisheries
    Boris Worm
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4J1, Canada
    Science 325:578-85. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint Global patterns of predator diversity in the open oceans
    Boris Worm
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4J1
    Science 309:1365-9. 2005
  6. pmc Range contraction in large pelagic predators
    Boris Worm
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4R2
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:11942-7. 2011
  7. ncbi request reprint Rapid worldwide depletion of predatory fish communities
    Ransom A Myers
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4J1
    Nature 423:280-3. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint Global phytoplankton decline over the past century
    Daniel G Boyce
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, B3H 4J1
    Nature 466:591-6. 2010
  9. doi request reprint Patterns and ecosystem consequences of shark declines in the ocean
    Francesco Ferretti
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, 1355 Oxford Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H4J1, Canada
    Ecol Lett 13:1055-71. 2010
  10. pmc Predator diversity hotspots in the blue ocean
    Boris Worm
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4J1
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:9884-8. 2003

Detail Information

Publications28

  1. ncbi request reprint Impacts of biodiversity loss on ocean ecosystem services
    Boris Worm
    Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4J1
    Science 314:787-90. 2006
    ..Yet available data suggest that at this point, these trends are still reversible...
  2. pmc Global diversity hotspots and conservation priorities for sharks
    Luis O Lucifora
    Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Centro de Investigaciones Ecológicas Subtropicales, Centro de Investigaciones del Bosque Atlántico, Puerto Iguazú, Misiones, Argentina
    PLoS ONE 6:e19356. 2011
    ..However, similar to terrestrial ecosystems, protected areas based on hotspots of diversity and endemism alone would provide insufficient means for safeguarding the diverse functional roles that sharks play in marine ecosystems...
  3. ncbi request reprint The future of fish
    Boris Worm
    Biology Department, PO Box 15000, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, B3H 4R2, Canada
    Trends Ecol Evol 27:594-9. 2012
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Rebuilding global fisheries
    Boris Worm
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4J1, Canada
    Science 325:578-85. 2009
    ..Impacts of international fleets and the lack of alternatives to fishing complicate prospects for rebuilding fisheries in many poorer regions, highlighting the need for a global perspective on rebuilding marine resources...
  5. ncbi request reprint Global patterns of predator diversity in the open oceans
    Boris Worm
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4J1
    Science 309:1365-9. 2005
    ..We conclude that predator diversity shows a predictable yet eroding pattern signaling ecosystem-wide changes linked to climate and fishing...
  6. pmc Range contraction in large pelagic predators
    Boris Worm
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4R2
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:11942-7. 2011
    ..These results mirror patterns described for many land predators, despite considerable differences in habitat, mobility, and dispersal, and imply ecological extirpation of heavily exploited species across parts of their range...
  7. ncbi request reprint Rapid worldwide depletion of predatory fish communities
    Ransom A Myers
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4J1
    Nature 423:280-3. 2003
    ..Our analysis suggests that management based on recent data alone may be misleading, and provides minimum estimates for unexploited communities, which could serve as the 'missing baseline' needed for future restoration efforts...
  8. ncbi request reprint Global phytoplankton decline over the past century
    Daniel G Boyce
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, B3H 4J1
    Nature 466:591-6. 2010
    ..We conclude that global phytoplankton concentration has declined over the past century; this decline will need to be considered in future studies of marine ecosystems, geochemical cycling, ocean circulation and fisheries...
  9. doi request reprint Patterns and ecosystem consequences of shark declines in the ocean
    Francesco Ferretti
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, 1355 Oxford Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H4J1, Canada
    Ecol Lett 13:1055-71. 2010
    ..Yet more empirical evidence is needed to test the generality of these effects throughout the ocean...
  10. pmc Predator diversity hotspots in the blue ocean
    Boris Worm
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4J1
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:9884-8. 2003
    ..We conclude that the seemingly monotonous landscape of the open ocean shows rich structure in species diversity and that these features should be used to focus future conservation efforts...
  11. pmc Extinction, survival or recovery of large predatory fishes
    Ransom A Myers
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4J1, Canada
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 360:13-20. 2005
    ..This requires reductions in fishing effort, reduction in bycatch mortality and protection of key areas to initiate recovery of severely depleted communities...
  12. ncbi request reprint Human impacts on the species-area relationship in reef fish assemblages
    Derek P Tittensor
    Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada
    Ecol Lett 10:760-72. 2007
    ..We propose that species-area curves can be sensitive indicators of community-level changes in biodiversity, and may be useful in quantifying the human imprint on reef biodiversity, and potentially elsewhere...
  13. pmc Global population trends and human use patterns of Manta and Mobula rays
    Christine A Ward-Paige
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    PLoS ONE 8:e74835. 2013
    ..Our analyses support previous studies in showing the need for improved conservation and monitoring efforts, and suggest that international and enforceable management policies are required to prevent further population decline. ..
  14. ncbi request reprint Collapse and conservation of shark populations in the Northwest Atlantic
    Julia K Baum
    Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4J1
    Science 299:389-92. 2003
    ..Closed-area models highlight priority areas for shark conservation, and the need to consider effort reallocation and site selection if marine reserves are to benefit multiple threatened species...
  15. doi request reprint Global patterns and predictors of marine biodiversity across taxa
    Derek P Tittensor
    Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, 1355 Oxford Street, Halifax B3H 4J1, Canada
    Nature 466:1098-101. 2010
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Consumer versus resource control of species diversity and ecosystem functioning
    Boris Worm
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 4J1, Canada
    Nature 417:848-51. 2002
    ..This suggests that human impacts on nutrient supply and food-web structure have strong and interdependent effects on species diversity and ecosystem functioning, and must therefore be managed together...
  17. pmc How many species are there on Earth and in the ocean?
    Camilo Mora
    Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    PLoS Biol 9:e1001127. 2011
    ..Renewed interest in further exploration and taxonomy is required if this significant gap in our knowledge of life on Earth is to be closed...
  18. ncbi request reprint Cascading top-down effects of changing oceanic predator abundances
    Julia K Baum
    Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada
    J Anim Ecol 78:699-714. 2009
    ....
  19. doi request reprint Diversity of deep-water cetaceans in relation to temperature: implications for ocean warming
    Hal Whitehead
    Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, 1355 Oxford St, Halifax, NS, Canada
    Ecol Lett 11:1198-207. 2008
    ..This suggests that deep-water oceanic communities that dominate > 60% of the planet's surface may reorganize in response to ocean warming, with low-latitude losses of diversity and resilience...
  20. ncbi request reprint Interactions between small pelagic fish and young cod across the north Atlantic
    Cóilín Minto
    Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4Jl, Canada
    Ecology 93:2139-54. 2012
    ..The methods introduced here are applicable in the investigation of species interactions from time series data collected across different study systems...
  21. pmc Management effectiveness of the world's marine fisheries
    Camilo Mora
    Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 7:e1000131. 2009
    ..Our results illustrate the great vulnerability of the world's fisheries and the urgent need to meet well-identified guidelines for sustainable management; they also provide a baseline against which future changes can be quantified...
  22. doi request reprint Historical baselines for large marine animals
    Heike K Lotze
    Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4J1, Canada
    Trends Ecol Evol 24:254-62. 2009
    ..These emerging historical patterns offer new insights into past ecosystems, and provide important context for contemporary ocean management...
  23. ncbi request reprint Boyce et al. reply
    Daniel G Boyce
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, B3H 4J1
    Nature 472:E8-9. 2011
    ..5-1.5% less of the variance in surface Chl than precision measurements of water-leaving radiance (remotely sensed ocean colour)...
  24. pmc Ecosystem recovery after climatic extremes enhanced by genotypic diversity
    Thorsten B H Reusch
    Max Planck Institut für Limnologie, August Thienemann Strasse 2, 24306 Plön, Germany
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:2826-31. 2005
    ..Our results highlight the importance of maintaining genetic as well as species diversity to enhance ecosystem resilience in a world of increasing uncertainty...
  25. ncbi request reprint Managing fisheries in a changing climate
    Boris Worm
    Nature 429:15. 2004
  26. doi request reprint Predicting ecological consequences of marine top predator declines
    Michael R Heithaus
    Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, North Miami, FL 33181, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 23:202-10. 2008
    ..We conclude that marine predators should be managed for the maintenance of both density- and risk-driven ecological processes, and not demographic persistence alone...
  27. ncbi request reprint Saving endangered whales at no cost
    Ransom A Myers
    Curr Biol 17:R10-1. 2007
  28. ncbi request reprint Adaptive management of the Great Barrier Reef and the Grand Canyon world heritage areas
    Terence P Hughes
    Australian Research Council, Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia
    Ambio 36:586-92. 2007
    ....