Stephen Wroe

Summary

Affiliation: University of New South Wales
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Bite forces and evolutionary adaptations to feeding ecology in carnivores
    Per Christiansen
    Zoological Museum, Universitetsparken 15, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark
    Ecology 88:347-58. 2007
  2. doi request reprint How to build a mammalian super-predator
    Stephen Wroe
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
    Zoology (Jena) 111:196-203. 2008
  3. ncbi request reprint Convergence and remarkably consistent constraint in the evolution of carnivore skull shape
    Stephen Wroe
    School of Biological, Earth, and Environmental Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
    Evolution 61:1251-60. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint High-resolution three-dimensional computer simulation of hominid cranial mechanics
    Stephen Wroe
    School of Biological Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, NSW, Australia
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 290:1248-55. 2007
  5. pmc The craniomandibular mechanics of being human
    Stephen Wroe
    Computational Biomechanics Research Group, Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 277:3579-86. 2010
  6. pmc Computer simulation of feeding behaviour in the thylacine and dingo as a novel test for convergence and niche overlap
    Stephen Wroe
    School of Biological Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 274:2819-28. 2007
  7. pmc Cranial performance in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) as revealed by high-resolution 3-D finite element analysis
    Karen Moreno
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Australia
    J Anat 212:736-46. 2008
  8. doi request reprint Allometry in the distribution of material properties and geometry of the felid skull: why larger species may need to change and how they may achieve it
    Uphar Chamoli
    Computational Biomechanics Research Group, Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Kensington Campus, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
    J Theor Biol 283:217-26. 2011
  9. pmc On the rarity of big fierce carnivores and primacy of isolation and area: tracking large mammalian carnivore diversity on two isolated continents
    Stephen Wroe
    School of Biological Sciences AO8, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 271:1203-11. 2004
  10. pmc Effects of gape and tooth position on bite force and skull stress in the dingo (Canis lupus dingo) using a 3-dimensional finite element approach
    Jason Bourke
    School of Biological Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    PLoS ONE 3:e2200. 2008

Detail Information

Publications21

  1. ncbi request reprint Bite forces and evolutionary adaptations to feeding ecology in carnivores
    Per Christiansen
    Zoological Museum, Universitetsparken 15, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark
    Ecology 88:347-58. 2007
    ..Our results suggest that the incorporation of bite force data may assist in the construction of more robust evolutionary and palaeontological analyses of feeding ecology...
  2. doi request reprint How to build a mammalian super-predator
    Stephen Wroe
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
    Zoology (Jena) 111:196-203. 2008
    ....
  3. ncbi request reprint Convergence and remarkably consistent constraint in the evolution of carnivore skull shape
    Stephen Wroe
    School of Biological, Earth, and Environmental Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
    Evolution 61:1251-60. 2007
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint High-resolution three-dimensional computer simulation of hominid cranial mechanics
    Stephen Wroe
    School of Biological Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, NSW, Australia
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 290:1248-55. 2007
    ..We hypothesize that, despite energetic costs, this system may lend adaptive advantage through enhancing the organism's ability to modify its behavior before reaching catastrophic failure in bony or dental structures...
  5. pmc The craniomandibular mechanics of being human
    Stephen Wroe
    Computational Biomechanics Research Group, Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 277:3579-86. 2010
    ..Our findings resolve apparently discordant lines of evidence, i.e. the presence of teeth well adapted to sustain high loads within a lightweight cranium and mandible...
  6. pmc Computer simulation of feeding behaviour in the thylacine and dingo as a novel test for convergence and niche overlap
    Stephen Wroe
    School of Biological Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 274:2819-28. 2007
    ..It is probable that there was considerable ecological overlap. As a large mammalian hypercarnivore adapted to taking small-medium sized prey, the thylacine may have been particularly vulnerable to disturbance...
  7. pmc Cranial performance in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) as revealed by high-resolution 3-D finite element analysis
    Karen Moreno
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Australia
    J Anat 212:736-46. 2008
    ..komodoensis shares various cranial and dental characteristics...
  8. doi request reprint Allometry in the distribution of material properties and geometry of the felid skull: why larger species may need to change and how they may achieve it
    Uphar Chamoli
    Computational Biomechanics Research Group, Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Kensington Campus, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
    J Theor Biol 283:217-26. 2011
    ..We further suggest that these trends and the explanations for them may be universal for vertebrates...
  9. pmc On the rarity of big fierce carnivores and primacy of isolation and area: tracking large mammalian carnivore diversity on two isolated continents
    Stephen Wroe
    School of Biological Sciences AO8, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 271:1203-11. 2004
    ..We conclude that isolation and landmass area, rather than productivity, are the primary constraints on large mammalian carnivore diversity. Our results quantify the rarity of large hypercarnivorous mammals worldwide...
  10. pmc Effects of gape and tooth position on bite force and skull stress in the dingo (Canis lupus dingo) using a 3-dimensional finite element approach
    Jason Bourke
    School of Biological Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    PLoS ONE 3:e2200. 2008
    ..Stress data, combined with bite force information, suggested that there is an optimal bite angle of between 25 degrees and 35 degrees in C. l. dingo. The function of these rather small bite angles remains unclear...
  11. pmc Human remains from the Pleistocene-Holocene transition of southwest China suggest a complex evolutionary history for East Asians
    Darren Curnoe
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    PLoS ONE 7:e31918. 2012
    ..We also undertook new excavations at Maludong (Yunnan Province) to clarify the stratigraphy and dating of a large sample of mostly undescribed human remains from the site...
  12. doi request reprint Ossification heterochrony in the therian postcranial skeleton and the marsupial-placental dichotomy
    Vera Weisbecker
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, UNSW NSW 2052, Australia
    Evolution 62:2027-41. 2008
    ..This suggests that ossification heterochrony in marsupials is not directly related to diversity constraints on the marsupial forelimb and shoulder girdle...
  13. pmc An experimentally validated micromechanical model of a rat vertebra under compressive loading
    Naomi Tsafnat
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, NSW, Sydney, Australia
    J Anat 218:40-6. 2011
    ..Experimentally validated micro-FE analyses are a powerful method in the study of materials with complex microstructures such as bone...
  14. pmc Climate change frames debate over the extinction of megafauna in Sahul (Pleistocene Australia-New Guinea)
    Stephen Wroe
    School of Biological, Earth, and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:8777-81. 2013
    ..Mounting evidence points to the loss of most species before the peopling of Sahul (circa 50-45 ka) and a significant role for climate change in the disappearance of the continent's megafauna...
  15. doi request reprint Finite element analysis of three patterns of internal fixation of fractures of the mandibular condyle
    Peter Aquilina
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia Computational Biomechanics Research Group, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Faciomaxillary Surgery, The Nepean Hospital, Sydney, Australia Electronic address
    Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg 51:326-31. 2013
    ..The use of two parallel titanium plates resulted in a superior biomechanical result as defined by mean element stresses and relative movement between the fractured fragments in these finite element models...
  16. pmc The size of the largest marsupial and why it matters
    Stephen Wroe
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 271:S34-6. 2004
    ..Our results contradict the conclusion that the maximum attainable body mass of an Australian marsupial has been constrained by low productivity...
  17. pmc Bite club: comparative bite force in big biting mammals and the prediction of predatory behaviour in fossil taxa
    Stephen Wroe
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia 2006
    Proc Biol Sci 272:619-25. 2005
    ..Extremely high BFQ in the marsupial lion, Thylacoleo carnifex, indicates that it filled a large-prey hunting niche...
  18. pmc Supermodeled sabercat, predatory behavior in Smilodon fatalis revealed by high-resolution 3D computer simulation
    Colin R McHenry
    School of Engineering, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:16010-5. 2007
    ..leo may be required for extended, asphyxiating bites and that the relatively low bite forces in S. fatalis might reflect its ability to kill large prey more quickly, avoiding the need for prolonged bites...
  19. ncbi request reprint Megafaunal extinction: climate, humans and assumptions
    Stephen Wroe
    Trends Ecol Evol 21:61-2; author reply 63-4. 2006
  20. ncbi request reprint Bottom-feeding plesiosaurs
    Colin R McHenry
    School of Environmental and Life Sciences Geology University of Newcastle, New South Wales 2308, Australia
    Science 310:75. 2005
    ..These finds point to a wider niche than has previously been supposed for these seemingly specialized predators and may also influence long-running controversy over the question of gastrolith function in plesiosaurs...
  21. pmc Prolonged coexistence of humans and megafauna in Pleistocene Australia
    Clive N G Trueman
    School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2UP, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:8381-5. 2005
    ..Here, we present geochemical evidence that demonstrates the coexistence of humans and now-extinct megafaunal species on the Australian continent for a minimum of 15 ka...