Richard Shine

Summary

Affiliation: University of Sydney
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Relationships between sexual dimorphism and niche partitioning within a clade of sea-snakes (Laticaudinae)
    R Shine
    Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia, Australia
    Oecologia 133:45-53. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint Windows of embryonic sexual lability in two lizard species with environmental sex determination
    Richard Shine
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Ecology 88:1781-8. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint Is increased maternal basking an adaptation or a pre-adaptation to viviparity in lizards?
    Richard Shine
    Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    J Exp Zool A Comp Exp Biol 305:524-35. 2006
  4. ncbi request reprint Do lizards and snakes really differ in their ability to take large prey? A study of relative prey mass and feeding tactics in lizards
    Richard Shine
    Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia
    Oecologia 144:492-8. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Do female garter snakes evade males to avoid harassment or to enhance mate quality?
    Richard Shine
    Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Am Nat 165:660-8. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Does large body size in males evolve to facilitate forcible insemination? A study on garter snakes
    Richard Shine
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Evolution 59:2426-32. 2005
  7. doi request reprint Tracking elusive timber rattlers with molecular genetics
    Richard Shine
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Mol Ecol 17:715-6. 2008
  8. pmc A seasnake's colour affects its susceptibility to algal fouling
    R Shine
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 277:2459-64. 2010
  9. pmc Adapting to the unpredictable: reproductive biology of vertebrates in the Australian wet-dry tropics
    Richard Shine
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 363:363-73. 2008
  10. ncbi request reprint Does viviparity evolve in cold climate reptiles because pregnant females maintain stable (not high) body temperatures?
    Richard Shine
    School of Biological Sciences, A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Evolution 58:1809-18. 2004

Detail Information

Publications102 found, 100 shown here

  1. doi request reprint Relationships between sexual dimorphism and niche partitioning within a clade of sea-snakes (Laticaudinae)
    R Shine
    Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia, Australia
    Oecologia 133:45-53. 2002
    ..Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that sex differences in the mean adult body sizes and relative head sizes of laticaudine snakes are linked to sex differences in feeding biology. ..
  2. ncbi request reprint Windows of embryonic sexual lability in two lizard species with environmental sex determination
    Richard Shine
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Ecology 88:1781-8. 2007
    ....
  3. ncbi request reprint Is increased maternal basking an adaptation or a pre-adaptation to viviparity in lizards?
    Richard Shine
    Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    J Exp Zool A Comp Exp Biol 305:524-35. 2006
    ..Thus, as for many other behavioural correlates of pregnancy in viviparous reptiles, maternal thermophily likely may have already been present in the ancestral oviparous taxa that gave rise to present-day viviparous forms...
  4. ncbi request reprint Do lizards and snakes really differ in their ability to take large prey? A study of relative prey mass and feeding tactics in lizards
    Richard Shine
    Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia
    Oecologia 144:492-8. 2005
    ..Thus, although lizards lack the impressive cranial kinesis or prey-subduction adaptations of snakes, at least some lizards are capable of overpowering and ingesting prey items as large as those consumed by snakes of similar body sizes...
  5. ncbi request reprint Do female garter snakes evade males to avoid harassment or to enhance mate quality?
    Richard Shine
    Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Am Nat 165:660-8. 2005
    ..In total, our data are most consistent with the hypothesis that female garter snakes at communal dens evade males to escape harassment rather than to enhance mate quality...
  6. ncbi request reprint Does large body size in males evolve to facilitate forcible insemination? A study on garter snakes
    Richard Shine
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Evolution 59:2426-32. 2005
    ..Experimental studies are needed to determine whether the same situation occurs in other organisms in which body-size advantages have been attributed to male-male rather than male-female interactions...
  7. doi request reprint Tracking elusive timber rattlers with molecular genetics
    Richard Shine
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Mol Ecol 17:715-6. 2008
    ..The study by Clark et al. in this issue builds upon our increasingly sophisticated understanding of snake behaviour, to interpret patterns of gene flow in the light of our emerging knowledge of snake behavioural ecology...
  8. pmc A seasnake's colour affects its susceptibility to algal fouling
    R Shine
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 277:2459-64. 2010
    ..Effects of algal cover on a snake's hydrodynamic efficiency and/or its rate of cutaneous gas exchange thus may impose selection on the colours of aquatic organisms...
  9. pmc Adapting to the unpredictable: reproductive biology of vertebrates in the Australian wet-dry tropics
    Richard Shine
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 363:363-73. 2008
    ..Such flexibility fine-tunes developmental rates and trajectories to conditions--especially, rainfall patterns--that are not predictable at the time of oviposition...
  10. ncbi request reprint Does viviparity evolve in cold climate reptiles because pregnant females maintain stable (not high) body temperatures?
    Richard Shine
    School of Biological Sciences, A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Evolution 58:1809-18. 2004
    ..More generally, variances as well as mean values of abiotic factors may constitute significant selective forces on life-history evolution...
  11. pmc Reproductive strategies in snakes
    Richard Shine
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 270:995-1004. 2003
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint Conflicts between courtship and thermoregulation: the thermal ecology of amorous male garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis, colubridae)
    R Shine
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, 2006, Australia
    Physiol Biochem Zool 73:508-16. 2000
    ..In the face of conflicting priorities, reptiles may often forgo precise thermoregulation because its benefits are too low, and its costs too high, compared with alternative behaviors...
  13. ncbi request reprint When to be born? Prolonged pregnancy or incubation enhances locomotor performance in neonatal lizards (Scincidae)
    R Shine
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    J Evol Biol 16:823-32. 2003
    ..We suggest that embryonic reptiles control their date of hatching or birth and thus, their stage of development at this critical life-history transition...
  14. ncbi request reprint Bumpus in the snake den: effects of sex, size, and body condition on mortality of red-sided garter snakes
    R Shine
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Evolution 55:598-604. 2001
    ..For example, sex biases in mortality reflect differences in postemergence behavior and locomotor capacity, the greater attractiveness of larger females to males, and the high energy costs of reproduction for females...
  15. ncbi request reprint Cryptic forcible insemination: male snakes exploit female physiology, anatomy, and behavior to obtain coercive matings
    Richard Shine
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales, 2006, Australia
    Am Nat 162:653-67. 2003
    ..Thus, superficially benign courtship behaviors may involve cryptic coercion even in species for which intuition dismisses any possibility of forcible insemination...
  16. ncbi request reprint Reproductive isolating mechanisms between two sympatric sibling species of sea snakes
    Richard Shine
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Evolution 56:1655-62. 2002
    ..colubrina), perhaps because a preference for courting larger females means that L. colubrina males would be unlikely to court L. frontalis-sized (i.e., small) females even in the absence of pheromonal barriers...
  17. ncbi request reprint Effects of pregnancy on locomotor performance: an experimental study on lizards
    Richard Shine
    Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Oecologia 136:450-6. 2003
    ..A lizard's sex, body size and shape had little effect on its running ability either before or after treatment, but faster lizards showed a greater performance decrement after burdening than did their slower conspecifics...
  18. doi request reprint Determinants of incubation period: do reptilian embryos hatch after a fixed total number of heart beats?
    Wei Guo Du
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW, 2006 Australia
    J Exp Biol 212:1302-6. 2009
    ....
  19. doi request reprint Host-parasite relationships during a biologic invasion: 75 years postinvasion, cane toads and sympatric Australian frogs retain separate lungworm faunas
    Ligia Pizzatto
    School of Biological Sciences, A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    J Wildl Dis 48:951-61. 2012
    ..are widely distributed geographically and across host taxa but are more common in some frog species (especially, large-bodied species) than they are in others...
  20. ncbi request reprint Maternal and environmental effects on offspring phenotypes in an oviparous lizard: do field data corroborate laboratory data?
    Daniel A Warner
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Oecologia 161:209-20. 2009
    ..Hence, although many results from this field study corroborate those from the laboratory, caution is needed when extrapolating laboratory-incubation results to field conditions...
  21. pmc Beyond size-number trade-offs: clutch size as a maternal effect
    Gregory P Brown
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 364:1097-106. 2009
    ..Our results also challenge conventional experimental methodologies such as split-clutch designs for laboratory incubation studies: by separating an egg from its siblings, we may directly affect offspring size and thus viability...
  22. ncbi request reprint Are the phenotypic traits of hatchling lizards affected by maternal allocation of steroid hormones to the egg?
    Rajkumar S Radder
    School of Biological Sciences A08, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Gen Comp Endocrinol 154:111-9. 2007
    ..Hence, our results do not support the hypothesis that reproducing female lizards manipulate the phenotypic traits of their offspring by differential allocation of steroid hormones...
  23. ncbi request reprint Developmental success, stability, and plasticity in closely related parthenogenetic and sexual lizards (Heteronotia, Gekkonidae)
    Michael Kearney
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Evolution 58:1560-72. 2004
    ..and clonal selection in generating these divergent embryonic responses...
  24. ncbi request reprint Reid's paradox revisited: the evolution of dispersal kernels during range expansion
    Benjamin L Phillips
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Am Nat 172:S34-48. 2008
    ..For accurate long-range forecasts of range advance, we need to take into account the potential for dispersal kernels to be evolutionarily dynamic...
  25. pmc Exploiting intraspecific competitive mechanisms to control invasive cane toads (Rhinella marina)
    Michael R Crossland
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 279:3436-42. 2012
    ..More generally, communication systems that have evolved for intraspecific conflict provide novel opportunities for invasive-species control...
  26. pmc Habitat selection in a rocky landscape: experimentally decoupling the influence of retreat site attributes from that of landscape features
    Benjamin M Croak
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    PLoS ONE 7:e37982. 2012
    ..Standardized retreat sites can provide robust experimental data on the effects of landscape-scale attributes on retreat site selection, revealing interspecific divergences among sympatric taxa that use similar habitats...
  27. pmc Embryonic exposure to conspecific chemicals suppresses cane toad growth and survival
    Michael R Crossland
    School of Biological Sciences, A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Biol Lett 8:226-9. 2012
    ..The waterborne cue responsible for these effects might provide a weapon to reduce toad recruitment within the species' invaded range...
  28. ncbi request reprint Rain, prey and predators: climatically driven shifts in frog abundance modify reproductive allometry in a tropical snake
    Gregory P Brown
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Oecologia 154:361-8. 2007
    ..Thus, the link between female body size and reproductive output varied among years, with climatic factors modifying the relative reproductive rates of larger (older) versus smaller (younger) animals within the keelback population...
  29. doi request reprint Impact of invasive cane toads on Australian birds
    Christa Beckmann
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 Australia
    Conserv Biol 23:1544-9. 2009
    ....
  30. doi request reprint Plio-pleistocene diversification and connectivity between mainland and Tasmanian populations of Australian snakes (Drysdalia, Elapidae, Serpentes)
    Sylvain Dubey
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 56:1119-25. 2010
    ..Two highly divergent genetic lineages within Drysdalia coronoides occur in Tasmania. Molecular dating suggests that these lineages were isolated from the mainland in the Pleistocene...
  31. doi request reprint Offspring sex in a lizard depends on egg size
    Rajkumar S Radder
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Curr Biol 19:1102-5. 2009
    ..Remarkably, then, offspring sex in this species is the end result of an interaction between three mechanisms: sex chromosomes, nest temperatures, and yolk allocation...
  32. pmc Thermally induced torpor in fullterm lizard embryos synchronizes hatching with ambient conditions
    Rajkumar Radder
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Biol Lett 2:415-6. 2006
    ....
  33. ncbi request reprint Infection dynamics of the lungworm Rhabdias pseudosphaerocephala in its natural host, the cane toad (Bufo marinus), and in novel hosts (native Australian frogs)
    Ligia Pizzatto
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    J Wildl Dis 46:1152-64. 2010
    ..Evolution has resulted in an enhanced ability of the lungworm to locate the target organ (the lungs) of the toad, and an increase in rates of parasite survival within this host...
  34. ncbi request reprint The influence of hydric environments during egg incubation on embryonic heart rates and offspring phenotypes in a scincid lizard (Lampropholis guichenoti)
    Wei Guo Du
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 Australia
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 151:102-7. 2008
    ..Thus, as in many other squamate species, hatchling phenotypes and embryonic developmental rates of L. guichenoti are less sensitive to hydric conditions in the nest than to thermal regimes...
  35. pmc Fatal attraction: adaptations to prey on native frogs imperil snakes after invasion of toxic toads
    Mattias Hagman
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 276:2813-8. 2009
    ..Together, these results illustrate the dissonance in behavioural adaptations that can arise following the arrival of invasive species, and reveal the strong selection that occurs when mutually naive species first interact...
  36. pmc Transgenerational sex determination: the embryonic environment experienced by a male affects offspring sex ratio
    Daniel A Warner
    1 Department of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, USA 2 School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Sci Rep 3:2709. 2013
    ..This transgenerational effect on sex ratio may reflect an epigenetic influence on paternally-inherited DNA. Clearly, sex determination in reptiles is far more complex than is currently envisaged. ..
  37. pmc Can reptile embryos influence their own rates of heating and cooling?
    Wei Guo Du
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    PLoS ONE 8:e67095. 2013
    ..Our data challenge the view of reptile eggs as thermally passive, and suggest that embryos of reptile species with large eggs can influence their own rates of heating and cooling. ..
  38. pmc Movements and habitat use of an endangered snake, Hoplocephalus bungaroides (Elapidae): implications for conservation
    Benjamin M Croak
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia
    PLoS ONE 8:e61711. 2013
    ....
  39. pmc Cane toads on cowpats: commercial livestock production facilitates toad invasion in tropical australia
    Edna González-Bernal
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    PLoS ONE 7:e49351. 2012
    ..Livestock grazing is the primary form of land use over vast areas of Australia, and pastoral activities may have contributed substantially to the cane toad's successful invasion of that continent...
  40. doi request reprint Ontogenetic shifts in a prey's chemical defences influence feeding responses of a snake predator
    John Llewelyn
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Oecologia 169:965-73. 2012
    ..Our data are thus consistent with the hypothesis that ontogenetic changes in toxin content can affect individuals' vulnerability to predation...
  41. pmc Determinants of habitat selection by hatchling Australian freshwater crocodiles
    Ruchira Somaweera
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    PLoS ONE 6:e28533. 2011
    ..Thus, habitat selection of hatchling crocodiles in this system may be driven both by prey availability and by predation risk...
  42. doi request reprint Abiotic and biotic influences on the dispersal behavior of metamorph cane toads (Bufo marinus) in tropical Australia
    Travis Child
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    J Exp Zool A Ecol Genet Physiol 309:215-24. 2008
    ....
  43. pmc Invasion, stress, and spinal arthritis in cane toads
    Gregory P Brown
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:17698-700. 2007
    ....
  44. ncbi request reprint Estimating survival rates of uncatchable animals: the myth of high juvenile mortality in reptiles
    David A Pike
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Ecology 89:607-11. 2008
    ..Our analyses challenge the widely held belief that juvenile reptiles have low rates of annual survival and suggest instead that sampling problems and the elusive biology of juvenile reptiles have misled researchers in this respect...
  45. doi request reprint Corticosterone exposure during embryonic development affects offspring growth and sex ratios in opposing directions in two lizard species with environmental sex determination
    Daniel A Warner
    University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Physiol Biochem Zool 82:363-71. 2009
    ..These results demonstrate the complexity of proximate mechanisms for sex determination among reptiles with TSD and illustrate the potential role of corticosterone in sex-determining systems...
  46. ncbi request reprint Locomotor performance in an invasive species: cane toads from the invasion front have greater endurance, but not speed, compared to conspecifics from a long-colonised area
    John Llewelyn
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia
    Oecologia 162:343-8. 2010
    ..Nonetheless, shifts in endurance between frontal and core populations of this invasive species point to the complex panoply of traits affected by selection for increased dispersal ability on expanding population fronts...
  47. ncbi request reprint Fitness of juvenile lizards depends on seasonal timing of hatching, not offspring body size
    Daniel A Warner
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia
    Oecologia 154:65-73. 2007
    ..Growth rates and survival were strongly enhanced by early-season hatching, but were not affected by hatchling body size...
  48. doi request reprint Facultative cardiac responses to regional hypoxia in lizard embryos
    Wei Guo Du
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 156:491-4. 2010
    ....
  49. ncbi request reprint The adaptive significance of temperature-dependent sex determination: experimental tests with a short-lived lizard
    Daniel A Warner
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Evolution 59:2209-21. 2005
    ..Thus, the timing of hatching is likely to influence reproductive success in this short-lived, early maturing species; and this effect may well differ between the sexes...
  50. pmc Maternal nutrition affects reproductive output and sex allocation in a lizard with environmental sex determination
    Daniel A Warner
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 274:883-90. 2007
    ..Overall, our results show that sex determination in these animals is more complex, and responsive to a wider range of environmental cues, than that suggested by the classification of 'environmental sex determination'...
  51. ncbi request reprint The ecological impact of invasive cane toads on tropical snakes: field data do not support laboratory-based predictions
    Gregory P Brown
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Ecology 92:422-31. 2011
    ..Our study casts doubt on the ability of a priori desktop studies, or short-term field surveys, to predict or document the ecological impact of invasive species...
  52. doi request reprint Size and sex matter: infection dynamics of an invading parasite (the pentastome Raillietiella frenatus) in an invading host (the cane toad Rhinella marina)
    Crystal Kelehear
    School of Biological Sciences, A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Parasitology 139:1596-604. 2012
    ..Although experimental studies are required to identify the causal bases of such patterns, our data confirm that infection status within a population can be strongly linked to host phenotypic traits...
  53. doi request reprint Interacting impacts of invasive plants and invasive toads on native lizards
    Samantha J Price-Rees
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Am Nat 179:413-22. 2012
    ..As a result, populations of lizards from areas previously exposed to these alien plants may be preadapted to deal with the toxins of the more recent anuran invader...
  54. ncbi request reprint Modeling the consequences of thermal trait variation for the cane toad invasion of Australia
    Jason J Kolbe
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Ecol Appl 20:2273-85. 2010
    ..Low-temperature tolerance of the adult phase may constrain the southern range limit of the cane toad in Australia, and plasticity in this trait may have facilitated the southward range expansion...
  55. doi request reprint Establishment success of introduced amphibians increases in the presence of congeneric species
    Reid Tingley
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Am Nat 177:382-8. 2011
    ....
  56. doi request reprint Influence of lung parasites on the growth rates of free-ranging and captive adult cane toads
    Crystal Kelehear
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Oecologia 165:585-92. 2011
    ..Rhabdias pseudosphaerocephala may be a valuable component of a biological control strategy for cane toads in Australia...
  57. ncbi request reprint Climate-induced reaction norms for life-history traits in pythons
    Beata Ujvari
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Ecology 92:1858-64. 2011
    ..Thus, the reaction norms recorded over 16 years of mal" (albeit highly variable) climatic conditions gave little insight into the population's response to a more extreme nutritional crisis...
  58. ncbi request reprint Parasites and pathogens lag behind their host during periods of host range advance
    Ben L Phillips
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Ecology 91:872-81. 2010
    ....
  59. pmc Turgid female toads give males the slip: a new mechanism of female mate choice in the Anura
    Bas Bruning
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Biol Lett 6:322-4. 2010
    ..This overlooked mechanism of anuran mate choice may reflect a common evolutionary pattern, whereby females co-opt defensive traits for use in sexual selection...
  60. ncbi request reprint Why do female lizards lay their eggs in communal nests?
    Rajkumar S Radder
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    J Anim Ecol 76:881-7. 2007
    ..5. Hydric modifications of incubation conditions within a cluster of tightly packed eggs thus may provide a direct fitness benefit to communal oviposition...
  61. ncbi request reprint Do changing moisture levels during incubation influence phenotypic traits of hatchling snakes (Tropidonophis mairii, Colubridae)?
    Gregory P Brown
    Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Physiol Biochem Zool 78:524-30. 2005
    ....
  62. ncbi request reprint Competing for crevices: interspecific conflict influences retreat-site selection in montane lizards
    Tracy Langkilde
    University of Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia
    Oecologia 140:684-91. 2004
    ..We conclude that direct agonistic encounters between individuals of different species strongly influence habitat use by lizards within this assemblage...
  63. ncbi request reprint Different optimal offspring sizes for sons versus daughters may favor the evolution of temperature-dependent sex determination in viviparous lizards
    Tracy Langkilde
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Evolution 59:2275-80. 2005
    ..Hence, opposing fitness determinants of sons and daughters may have favored evolutionary transitions from genetic sex determination to TSD in both oviparous turtles and viviparous lizards...
  64. pmc Rapid shifts in dispersal behavior on an expanding range edge
    Tom Lindström
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:13452-6. 2013
    ..This, in turn, will cause us to underpredict the rates at which invasive organisms move into new territory and at which native taxa can expand into newly available habitat under climate change. ..
  65. pmc Using combined morphological, allometric and molecular approaches to identify species of the genus Raillietiella (Pentastomida)
    Crystal Kelehear
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia
    PLoS ONE 6:e24936. 2011
    ..To facilitate valid descriptions of new species of pentastomes, future taxonomic work should include both morphological measurements (incorporating quantitative measures of body size and hook bluntness) and molecular data...
  66. pmc Interactions among thermal parameters determine offspring sex under temperature-dependent sex determination
    Daniel A Warner
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 278:256-65. 2011
    ....
  67. ncbi request reprint Offspring sex is not related to maternal allocation of yolk steroids in the lizard Bassiana duperreyi (Scincidae)
    Rajkumar Radder
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Physiol Biochem Zool 80:220-7. 2007
    ..Further, yolk steroid concentrations were not significantly related to egg size. Thus, yolk steroid hormones do not appear to play a critical role in sex determination for B. duperreyi...
  68. doi request reprint The effects of experimentally infecting Australian tree frogs with lungworms (Rhabdias pseudosphaerocephala) from invasive cane toads
    Ligia Pizzatto
    School of Biological Sciences A08, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Int J Parasitol 41:943-9. 2011
    ....
  69. ncbi request reprint Invasion and the evolution of speed in toads
    Benjamin L Phillips
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Nature 439:803. 2006
    ....
  70. pmc Smart moves: effects of relative brain size on establishment success of invasive amphibians and reptiles
    Joshua J Amiel
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    PLoS ONE 6:e18277. 2011
    ....
  71. ncbi request reprint Paternal alleles enhance female reproductive success in tropical pythons
    Thomas Madsen
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
    Mol Ecol 14:1783-7. 2005
    ..As microsatellite loci are unlikely to be direct targets of selection, we suggest that variability at these loci may cosegregate with other polymorphic genes directly linked to fitness...
  72. pmc Adapting to an invasive species: toxic cane toads induce morphological change in Australian snakes
    Ben L Phillips
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:17150-5. 2004
    ..These results provide strong evidence of adaptive changes in native predators as a result of the invasion of toxic prey...
  73. ncbi request reprint Nesting lizards (Bassiana duperreyi) compensate partly, but not completely, for climate change
    Rory S Telemeco
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Ecology 90:17-22. 2009
    ..As a result, mean incubation temperatures in natural nests now have crossed the thermal threshold at which incubation temperature directly affects offspring sex in this population...
  74. doi request reprint Lizards combine stored energy and recently acquired nutrients flexibly to fuel reproduction
    Daniel A Warner
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    J Anim Ecol 77:1242-9. 2008
    ....
  75. doi request reprint Impact of the invasive cane toad (Bufo marinus) on an Australian frog (Opisthodon ornatus) depends on minor variation in reproductive timing
    Michael R Crossland
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia
    Oecologia 158:625-32. 2009
    ..Minor interspecific differences in the seasonal timing of oviposition thus have the potential to massively alter the impact of invasive cane toads on native anurans...
  76. pmc Genetic evidence for co-occurrence of chromosomal and thermal sex-determining systems in a lizard
    Rajkumar S Radder
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Biol Lett 4:176-8. 2008
    ....
  77. ncbi request reprint Evaluating thermoregulation in reptiles: the fallacy of the inappropriately applied method
    Frank Seebacher
    School of Biological Sciences, Heydon Laurence Building A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Physiol Biochem Zool 77:688-95. 2004
    ..We derive correction factors specific for body mass and rate of movement that can be used to estimate body temperature null distributions of larger reptiles, thereby overcoming this methodological problem...
  78. pmc Evolutionary diversification of the lizard genus Bassiana (Scincidae) across Southern Australia
    Sylvain Dubey
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    PLoS ONE 5:e12982. 2010
    ..The lizard genus Bassiana (Squamata, Scincidae) contains three species that occur across a wide area of southern Australia (including Tasmania), rendering them ideally-suited to studies on the impact of past climatic fluctuations...
  79. pmc Maternal basking behaviour determines offspring sex in a viviparous reptile
    Erik Wapstra
    Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 271:S230-2. 2004
    ..Changes in thermoregulatory behaviour thus allow pregnant female lizards to modify the sex of their offspring...
  80. ncbi request reprint Sexual dimorphism in lizard body shape: the roles of sexual selection and fecundity selection
    Mats Olsson
    The University of Sydney, School of Biological Sciences, New South Wales, Australia
    Evolution 56:1538-42. 2002
    ..Thus, fecundity selection and sexual selection work in concert to drive the evolution of sexual dimorphism in trunk length in snow skinks...
  81. ncbi request reprint The adaptive significance of reptilian viviparity in the tropics: testing the maternal manipulation hypothesis
    Jonathan K Webb
    School of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Charles Darwin University, Northern Territory, Australia
    Evolution 60:115-22. 2006
    ....
  82. pmc Reproducing lizards modify sex allocation in response to operational sex ratios
    Daniel A Warner
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Biol Lett 3:47-50. 2007
    ..e. overproduced the more abundant sex). This response may enhance fitness if local OSRs predict survival probabilities of offspring of each sex, rather than the intensity of sexual competition...
  83. doi request reprint Early experience influences both habitat choice and locomotor performance in tiger snakes
    Fabien Aubret
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Am Nat 171:524-31. 2008
    ..imposed by that habitat type. The end result may be to create ecomorphs, whereby different individuals within a population become specialized for different types of habitats even in the absence of genetic differentiation...
  84. ncbi request reprint Compensating for a bad start: catch-up growth in juvenile lizards (Amphibolurus muricatus, Agamidae)
    Rajkumar S Radder
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia
    J Exp Zool A Ecol Genet Physiol 307:500-8. 2007
    ..Thus, the two groups were indistinguishable in body size at 6 months of age. Intriguingly, the compensatory growth occurred in winter, a period that is generally unsuitable for rapid growth in ectotherms...
  85. doi request reprint When dinner is dangerous: toxic frogs elicit species-specific responses from a generalist snake predator
    Ben Phillips
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Am Nat 170:936-42. 2007
    ..Adders deal with these prey types in different and highly stereotyped ways: they consume nontoxic frogs directly but envenomate and release the other taxa, waiting until the chemical defense loses its potency before consuming the prey...
  86. doi request reprint Origin of the parasites of an invading species, the Australian cane toad (Bufo marinus): are the lungworms Australian or American?
    Sylvain Dubey
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Mol Ecol 17:4418-24. 2008
    ..We did not find this lungworm species in any Australian frogs sympatric with cane toads, suggesting that the parasite does not attack Australian frogs and hence may offer potential as a biocontrol agent of the toad...
  87. pmc An invasive species induces rapid adaptive change in a native predator: cane toads and black snakes in Australia
    Ben L Phillips
    University of Sydney School of Biological Sciences A08 NSW 2006, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 273:1545-50. 2006
    ..Toads were brought to Australia in 1935, so these evolved responses have occurred in fewer than 23 snake generations...
  88. pmc Geographic variation in the age of temperate-zone reptile and amphibian species: Southern Hemisphere species are older
    Sylvain Dubey
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Biol Lett 7:96-7. 2011
    ..Because a species' age may influence its vulnerability to anthropogenic threats, geographical variation in species ages should be incorporated into conservation planning...
  89. pmc Like mother, like daughter: inheritance of nest-site location in snakes
    Gregory P Brown
    Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Biol Lett 3:131-3. 2007
    ....
  90. ncbi request reprint The ecological impact of invasive cane toads (Bufo marinus) in Australia
    Richard Shine
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Q Rev Biol 85:253-91. 2010
    ....
  91. pmc Kleptothermy: an additional category of thermoregulation, and a possible example in sea kraits (Laticauda laticaudata, Serpentes)
    François Brischoux
    Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Biol Lett 5:729-31. 2009
    ..Thermal monitoring on a small tropical island documents a possible example of kleptothermy, based on high stable temperatures of a sea snake (Laticauda laticaudata) inside a burrow occupied by seabirds...
  92. ncbi request reprint Energetic costs of tail loss in a montane scincid lizard
    Paul Doughty
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 135:215-9. 2003
    ..We also found that the width of the tail was a reliable non-invasive index of energy reserves in this species...
  93. ncbi request reprint The adaptive significance of sexually dimorphic scale rugosity in sea snakes
    Carla Avolio
    Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Am Nat 167:728-38. 2006
    ..Flow tank tests show that rugosities reduce the thickness of the boundary layer by almost 50% and create turbulent flow that should massively enhance rates of cutaneous oxygen uptake and hence prolong maximal courtship duration by males...
  94. doi request reprint A toad more traveled: the heterogeneous invasion dynamics of cane toads in Australia
    Mark C Urban
    National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, Santa Barbara, California 93101, USA
    Am Nat 171:E134-48. 2008
    ..As an invasive species spreads, it is likely to encounter conditions that influence dispersal rates via one or both of these mechanisms...
  95. ncbi request reprint Evolutionary biology: adaptive developmental plasticity in snakes
    Fabien Aubret
    CEBC CNRS, 79360 Villiers en Bois, France
    Nature 431:261-2. 2004
    ....
  96. pmc The cane toad's (Chaunus [Bufo] marinus) increasing ability to invade Australia is revealed by a dynamically updated range model
    Mark C Urban
    School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 274:1413-9. 2007
    ....
  97. pmc Does body volume constrain reproductive output in lizards?
    Weiguo Du
    Environmental Sciences, School of Life Sciences, Hangzhou Normal College, 310036 Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People s Republic of China
    Biol Lett 1:98-100. 2005
    ..Our surgical manipulations show that the amount of space available to hold eggs within a female's abdomen influences her total reproductive allocation, enabling her to flexibly modify her reproductive output as she grows larger...
  98. ncbi request reprint Life-history adaptations to arboreality in snakes
    Ligia Pizzatto
    Pós graduação em Ecologia, Depto de Zoologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP6109, 13083 970, Campinas, SP, Brazil
    Ecology 88:359-66. 2007
    ..This modification of ovarian morphology in arboreal snakes presumably reduces the degree of bodily distension during vitellogenesis and pregnancy, thus enhancing climbing ability and camouflage among the branches...
  99. ncbi request reprint Fat is sexy for females but not males: the influence of body reserves on reproduction in snakes (Vipera aspis)
    Fabien Aubret
    Centre d Etudes Biologiques de Chizé CNRS, 79360 Villiers en Bois, France
    Horm Behav 42:135-47. 2002
    ..e., no step function) with body condition in males, but high estradiol levels and sexual receptivity were seen only in females with body reserves above a critical threshold...
  100. ncbi request reprint Growth to death in lizards
    Mats Olsson
    The University of Sydney, School of Biological Sciences, New South Wales, Australia
    Evolution 56:1867-70. 2002
    ..When later released into the wild, the individuals that grew more rapidly as neonates experienced much higher mortality than did slower-growing conspecifics, regardless of the elevation at which they had been kept...
  101. ncbi request reprint How much stress do researchers inflict on their study animals? A case study using a scincid lizard, Eulamprus heatwolei
    Tracy Langkilde
    Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    J Exp Biol 209:1035-43. 2006
    ..More generally, we urge researchers to seek objective information on the effects of their activities on research subjects, rather than relying upon subjectivity and anthropomorphism in making these evaluations...