F Seebacher

Summary

Affiliation: University of Sydney
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. pmc Transition from ectothermy to endothermy: the development of metabolic capacity in a bird (Gallus gallus)
    Frank Seebacher
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 273:565-70. 2006
  2. doi request reprint Thermal acclimation and regulation of metabolism in a reptile (Crocodylus porosus): the importance of transcriptional mechanisms and membrane composition
    F Seebacher
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Physiol Biochem Zool 82:766-75. 2009
  3. pmc A falsification of the thermal specialization paradigm: compensation for elevated temperatures in Antarctic fishes
    Frank Seebacher
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Biol Lett 1:151-4. 2005
  4. ncbi request reprint A review of thermoregulation and physiological performance in reptiles: what is the role of phenotypic flexibility?
    Frank Seebacher
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Sciences A08, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    J Comp Physiol B 175:453-61. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Diving behaviour of a reptile (Crocodylus johnstoni) in the wild: interactions with heart rate and body temperature
    Frank Seebacher
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Physiol Biochem Zool 78:1-8. 2005
  6. pmc Individual recognition in crayfish (Cherax dispar): the roles of strength and experience in deciding aggressive encounters
    Frank Seebacher
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Biol Lett 3:471-4. 2007
  7. ncbi request reprint Evaluating thermoregulation in reptiles: the fallacy of the inappropriately applied method
    Frank Seebacher
    School of Biological Sciences, Heydon Laurence Building A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Physiol Biochem Zool 77:688-95. 2004
  8. ncbi request reprint Integration of autonomic and local mechanisms in regulating cardiovascular responses to heating and cooling in a reptile (Crocodylus porosus)
    Frank Seebacher
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Sciences A08, The University of Sydney, 2006 Sydney, NSW, Australia
    J Comp Physiol B 174:577-85. 2004
  9. ncbi request reprint Redistribution of blood within the body is important for thermoregulation in an ectothermic vertebrate (Crocodylus porosus)
    Frank Seebacher
    School of Biological Sciences A08, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Sydney, Australia
    J Comp Physiol B 177:841-8. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint Turtles (Chelodina longicollis) regulate muscle metabolic enzyme activity in response to seasonal variation in body temperature
    F Seebacher
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, 2006 New South Wales, Australia
    J Comp Physiol B 174:205-10. 2004

Detail Information

Publications40

  1. pmc Transition from ectothermy to endothermy: the development of metabolic capacity in a bird (Gallus gallus)
    Frank Seebacher
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 273:565-70. 2006
    ..We suggest that the phylogenetic occurrence of endothermy is restricted by its limited selective advantages rather than by evolutionary innovation...
  2. doi request reprint Thermal acclimation and regulation of metabolism in a reptile (Crocodylus porosus): the importance of transcriptional mechanisms and membrane composition
    F Seebacher
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Physiol Biochem Zool 82:766-75. 2009
    ..The importance of PGC-1alpha and PPARgamma in a reptile indicate that the mechanisms that regulate metabolism are conserved among vertebrates...
  3. pmc A falsification of the thermal specialization paradigm: compensation for elevated temperatures in Antarctic fishes
    Frank Seebacher
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Biol Lett 1:151-4. 2005
    ..Our falsification of the specialization paradigm indicates that the effect of climate change on species distribution and extinction may be overestimated by current models of global warming...
  4. ncbi request reprint A review of thermoregulation and physiological performance in reptiles: what is the role of phenotypic flexibility?
    Frank Seebacher
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Sciences A08, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    J Comp Physiol B 175:453-61. 2005
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Diving behaviour of a reptile (Crocodylus johnstoni) in the wild: interactions with heart rate and body temperature
    Frank Seebacher
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Physiol Biochem Zool 78:1-8. 2005
    ..4 m) dives. A bradycardia was observed during diving, although heart rate during submergence was only 12% lower than when animals were at the surface...
  6. pmc Individual recognition in crayfish (Cherax dispar): the roles of strength and experience in deciding aggressive encounters
    Frank Seebacher
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Biol Lett 3:471-4. 2007
    ..We suggest that this prolonged recognition of individuals and their relative fighting ability is a mechanism that can reduce the number of agonistic encounters experienced by individuals...
  7. ncbi request reprint Evaluating thermoregulation in reptiles: the fallacy of the inappropriately applied method
    Frank Seebacher
    School of Biological Sciences, Heydon Laurence Building A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Physiol Biochem Zool 77:688-95. 2004
    ..We derive correction factors specific for body mass and rate of movement that can be used to estimate body temperature null distributions of larger reptiles, thereby overcoming this methodological problem...
  8. ncbi request reprint Integration of autonomic and local mechanisms in regulating cardiovascular responses to heating and cooling in a reptile (Crocodylus porosus)
    Frank Seebacher
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Sciences A08, The University of Sydney, 2006 Sydney, NSW, Australia
    J Comp Physiol B 174:577-85. 2004
    ..porosus, although nitric oxide was important in buffering blood pressure against changes in heart rate during cooling, and inhibition caused a compensatory decrease in parasympathetic stimulation of the heart...
  9. ncbi request reprint Redistribution of blood within the body is important for thermoregulation in an ectothermic vertebrate (Crocodylus porosus)
    Frank Seebacher
    School of Biological Sciences A08, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Sydney, Australia
    J Comp Physiol B 177:841-8. 2007
    ..Hence, measures of heart rate alone are insufficient to assess physiological thermoregulation in reptiles...
  10. ncbi request reprint Turtles (Chelodina longicollis) regulate muscle metabolic enzyme activity in response to seasonal variation in body temperature
    F Seebacher
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, 2006 New South Wales, Australia
    J Comp Physiol B 174:205-10. 2004
    ..Ectothermic reptiles were often thought not to acclimatise biochemically, and our results show that behavioural attainment of a preferred body temperature is not mandatory for activity or physiological performance in turtles...
  11. doi request reprint Plasticity of muscle function in a thermoregulating ectotherm (Crocodylus porosus): biomechanics and metabolism
    Frank Seebacher
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 294:R1024-32. 2008
    ..We conclude that by combining thermoregulation with plasticity in biomechanical function, crocodiles maximize performance in environments with highly variable thermal properties...
  12. ncbi request reprint Body temperature null distributions in reptiles with nonzero heat capacity: seasonal thermoregulation in the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)
    Frank Seebacher
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Physiol Biochem Zool 76:348-59. 2003
    ..We concluded that alligators may not rely exclusively on regulation of body temperature but that they may also acclimatise biochemically to seasonally changing environmental conditions...
  13. ncbi request reprint Seasonal acclimatisation of muscle metabolic enzymes in a reptile (Alligator mississippiensis)
    Frank Seebacher
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    J Exp Biol 206:1193-200. 2003
    ..Our data indicate that biochemical acclimatisation is important in thermoregulation of reptiles and that it is not sufficient to base conclusions about their thermoregulatory ability entirely on behavioural patterns...
  14. pmc Transient receptor potential ion channels control thermoregulatory behaviour in reptiles
    Frank Seebacher
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    PLoS ONE 2:e281. 2007
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Control of heart rate during thermoregulation in the heliothermic lizard Pogona barbata: importance of cholinergic and adrenergic mechanisms
    F Seebacher
    School of Biological Sciences A08, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    J Exp Biol 204:4361-6. 2001
    ..The results showed that cholinergic and beta-adrenergic systems are not the only control mechanisms acting on the heart during heating and cooling, but they do have a significant effect on heart rate and on rates of heating and cooling...
  16. ncbi request reprint Changes in heart rate are important for thermoregulation in the varanid lizard Varanus varius
    F Seebacher
    Department of Zoology and Entomology, Australia
    J Comp Physiol B 171:395-400. 2001
    ..2-1.3 at body temperatures of 34-36 degrees C. There was a significant decrease in thermal time constants with increasing heart rate during heating and cooling confirming that changes in heart rate are linked to rates of heat exchange...
  17. doi request reprint Plasticity of oxidative metabolism in variable climates: molecular mechanisms
    Frank Seebacher
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Physiol Biochem Zool 83:721-32. 2010
    ....
  18. ncbi request reprint Physiological mechanisms of thermoregulation in reptiles: a review
    Frank Seebacher
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia
    J Comp Physiol B 175:533-41. 2005
    ..Future research on reptilian thermoregulation should focus on the pathways that connect peripheral sensing to central processing which will ultimately lead to the thermoregulatory response...
  19. ncbi request reprint Beneficial acclimation: sex specific thermal acclimation of metabolic capacity in the striped marsh frog (Limnodynastes peronii)
    Kris D Rogers
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Sciences A08, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    J Exp Biol 210:2932-8. 2007
    ....
  20. ncbi request reprint Compensation for environmental change by complementary shifts of thermal sensitivity and thermoregulatory behaviour in an ectotherm
    E J Glanville
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    J Exp Biol 209:4869-77. 2006
    ..The extraordinary shift in behaviour and locomotory and metabolic performance shows that within individuals, behaviour and physiology covary to maximise performance in different environments...
  21. doi request reprint Plasticity in body temperature and metabolic capacity sustains winter activity in a small endotherm (Rattus fuscipes)
    Elsa J Glanville
    School of Biological Sciences, Integrative Physiology Research Group, Heydon Laurence Building A08, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 155:383-91. 2010
    ..Mitochondrial function compensates for lower winter body temperatures, buffering metabolic heat production capacity...
  22. pmc Field test of a paradigm: hysteresis of heart rate in thermoregulation by a free-ranging lizard (Pogona barbata)
    G C Grigg
    Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 266:1291-7. 1999
    ..These results demonstrate that physiological control of thermoregulation in reptiles is more complex than has been previously recognized...
  23. doi request reprint Physiological and behavioural responses to seasonal changes in environmental temperature in the Australian spiny crayfish Euastacus sulcatus
    Katrin Lowe
    School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia
    J Comp Physiol B 180:653-60. 2010
    ..sulcatus. Thus, we found that the semi-terrestrial crayfish E. sulcatus used neither thermoregulatory behaviours nor physiological strategies to deal with seasonal changes in environmental temperature...
  24. doi request reprint Endothermy in birds: underlying molecular mechanisms
    Isabel Walter
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Sciences A08, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    J Exp Biol 212:2328-36. 2009
    ....
  25. ncbi request reprint The effect of heat transfer mode on heart rate responses and hysteresis during heating and cooling in the estuarine crocodile Crocodylus porosus
    Craig E Franklin
    Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia
    J Exp Biol 206:1143-51. 2003
    ....
  26. doi request reprint Can phenotypic plasticity facilitate the geographic expansion of the tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus?
    A K Schnell
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Science A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Physiol Biochem Zool 81:733-42. 2008
    ..The capacity for phenotypic plasticity in O. mossambicus means that the fish would not be limited by its locomotor performance or metabolic physiology to expand its range into cooler thermal environments from its current distribution...
  27. ncbi request reprint Biochemical acclimation of metabolic enzymes in response to lowered temperature in tadpoles of Limnodynastes peronii
    Kris D Rogers
    School of Biological Sciences A08, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 137:731-8. 2004
    ..01) when compared to the control group (1.6+/-0.15). The rate at which acclimation in this species occurs is appropriate for seasonal changes in temperature, and these animals may not be able to respond to a rapid drop in temperature...
  28. ncbi request reprint Physiological thermoregulation in a crustacean? Heart rate hysteresis in the freshwater crayfish Cherax destructor
    Jacqueline E Goudkamp
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 138:399-403. 2004
    ....
  29. doi request reprint Responses to temperature variation: integration of thermoregulation and metabolism in vertebrates
    Frank Seebacher
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    J Exp Biol 212:2885-91. 2009
    ..Hence, endothermic adaptive thermogenesis may result from the same regulatory pathways as ectothermic metabolic acclimation, and both could be considered as adaptive metabolic responses to temperature variation...
  30. ncbi request reprint Molecular mechanisms underlying the development of endothermy in birds (Gallus gallus): a new role of PGC-1 alpha?
    Isabel Walter
    Integrative Physiology, School of Biological Sciences A08, The Univ of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 293:R2315-22. 2007
    ..Our findings suggest that PGC-1 alpha might be important for establishing endothermic metabolic capacity during embryogenesis in birds...
  31. pmc Prostaglandins are important in thermoregulation of a reptile (Pogona vitticeps)
    Frank Seebacher
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 270:S50-3. 2003
    ..We speculate that heart-rate hysteresis evolved as a thermoregulatory mechanism that may ultimately be controlled by neurally induced stimulation of nitric oxide production, or maybe via photolytically induced production of vitamin D...
  32. doi request reprint AMP-activated protein kinase controls metabolism and heat production during embryonic development in birds
    Isabel Walter
    School of Biological Sciences A08, Integrative Physiology, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    J Exp Biol 213:3167-76. 2010
    ..We propose AMPK as a principal regulatory mechanism during the transition from ectothermy to endothermy in birds, and show that AMPK function in birds is similar to that observed in mammals...
  33. doi request reprint Increased aggression during pregnancy comes at a higher metabolic cost
    F Seebacher
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2005, Australia
    J Exp Biol 216:771-6. 2013
    ..This dependence on metabolic scope could render reproductive success sensitive to environmental changes...
  34. ncbi request reprint Heat transfer in a microvascular network: the effect of heart rate on heating and cooling in reptiles (Pogona barbata and Varanus varius)
    F Seebacher
    Department of Zoology and Entomology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, 4072, Australia
    J Theor Biol 203:97-109. 2000
    ..It was concluded that changes in heart rate in response to heating and cooling confer a selective advantage at least on reptiles of mass similar to that of the study animals (0. 21-5.6 kg)...
  35. pmc Novel reptilian uncoupling proteins: molecular evolution and gene expression during cold acclimation
    Tonia S Schwartz
    School of Biological Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 275:979-85. 2008
    ..In birds, UCP3 may have assumed a similar function as UCP1 in mammals, which has important ramifications for understanding endothermic heat production...
  36. ncbi request reprint Energetic cost of a meal in a frequent feeding lizard
    Sebastian Iglesias
    School of Biological Sciences A08 and Institute of Wildlife Research, University of Sydney, N S W 2006 Sydney, Australia
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 135:377-82. 2003
    ..This prolonged rise in metabolism resulting from frequent feeding does not result in a higher energetic cost of SDA compared with that resulting from infrequent single feeding...
  37. ncbi request reprint Dishonest signals of strength in male slender crayfish (Cherax dispar) during agonistic encounters
    Robbie S Wilson
    School of Integrative Biology, Ecology Centre, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia
    Am Nat 170:284-91. 2007
    ..From our studies of crayfish, we believe dishonest signaling could play a greater role in territorial disputes than previously imagined...
  38. ncbi request reprint Antarctic fish can compensate for rising temperatures: thermal acclimation of cardiac performance in Pagothenia borchgrevinki
    Craig E Franklin
    School of Integrative Biology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia
    J Exp Biol 210:3068-74. 2007
    ..borchgrevinki demonstrated the capacity to thermally acclimate cardiac function to elevated temperatures, thereby allowing the maintenance of factorial scope and the support of aerobic swimming at higher temperatures...
  39. ncbi request reprint Thermal sensitivity of heart rate and insensitivity of blood pressure in the Antarctic nototheniid fish Pagothenia borchgrevinki
    Cara J Lowe
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
    J Comp Physiol B 175:97-105. 2005
    ..With the return of the fish to environmental temperatures, the heart rate rapidly decreased back to control levels, while ventral aortic pressure increased and remained elevated for over an hour following a 6 degrees C exposure...
  40. ncbi request reprint Coadaptation: a unifying principle in evolutionary thermal biology
    Michael J Angilletta
    Department of Ecology and Organismal Biology, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, Indiana 47809, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 79:282-94. 2006
    ....