T Ross

Summary

Affiliation: University of Tasmania
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. ncbi Indices for performance evaluation of predictive models in food microbiology
    T Ross
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    J Appl Bacteriol 81:501-8. 1996
  2. ncbi Effect of relative inoculum concentration on Listeria monocytogenes growth in co-culture
    L A Mellefont
    Australian Food Safety Centre of Excellence, School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 54, Hobart 7001, Tasmania, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 121:157-68. 2008
  3. ncbi Validation of a model describing the effects of temperature and water activity on the growth of psychrotrophic pseudomonads
    K Neumeyer
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 38:55-63. 1997
  4. ncbi Performance evaluation of a model describing the effects of temperature, water activity, pH and lactic acid concentration on the growth of Escherichia coli
    L A Mellefont
    Centre for Food Safety and Quality, School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252 54, Hobart 7001, Tasmania, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 82:45-58. 2003
  5. ncbi Viable count estimates of lag time responses for Salmonella typhimurium M48 subjected to abrupt osmotic shifts
    L A Mellefont
    Australian Food Safety Centre of Excellence, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 54, Hobart 7001, Tasmania, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 105:399-410. 2005
  6. ncbi Predictive modelling of the growth and survival of Listeria in fishery products
    T Ross
    School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 62:231-45. 2000
  7. ncbi Development of a predictive model to describe the effects of temperature and water activity on the growth of spoilage pseudomonads
    K Neumeyer
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 38:45-54. 1997
  8. pmc Modelling the growth rate of Escherichia coli as a function of pH and lactic acid concentration
    K A Presser
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Appl Environ Microbiol 63:2355-60. 1997
  9. ncbi Effect of potassium lactate and a potassium lactate-sodium diacetate blend on Listeria monocytogenes growth in modified atmosphere packaged sliced ham
    L A Mellefont
    Australian Food Safety Centre of Excellence, Tasmanian Institute of Agricultural Research, School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 54, Hobart 7001, Tasmania, Australia
    J Food Prot 70:2297-305. 2007
  10. pmc Physicochemical parameters for growth of the sea ice bacteria Glaciecola punicea ACAM 611(T) and Gelidibacter sp. strain IC158
    D S Nichols
    School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia
    Appl Environ Microbiol 65:3757-60. 1999

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications35

  1. ncbi Indices for performance evaluation of predictive models in food microbiology
    T Ross
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    J Appl Bacteriol 81:501-8. 1996
    ....
  2. ncbi Effect of relative inoculum concentration on Listeria monocytogenes growth in co-culture
    L A Mellefont
    Australian Food Safety Centre of Excellence, School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 54, Hobart 7001, Tasmania, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 121:157-68. 2008
    ....
  3. ncbi Validation of a model describing the effects of temperature and water activity on the growth of psychrotrophic pseudomonads
    K Neumeyer
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 38:55-63. 1997
    ..The psychrotrophic pseudomonad model was shown to predict accurately the growth of pseudomonads in the products tested. In some instances knowledge of the lag phase duration was required to maximise the performance of the model...
  4. ncbi Performance evaluation of a model describing the effects of temperature, water activity, pH and lactic acid concentration on the growth of Escherichia coli
    L A Mellefont
    Centre for Food Safety and Quality, School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252 54, Hobart 7001, Tasmania, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 82:45-58. 2003
    ....
  5. ncbi Viable count estimates of lag time responses for Salmonella typhimurium M48 subjected to abrupt osmotic shifts
    L A Mellefont
    Australian Food Safety Centre of Excellence, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 54, Hobart 7001, Tasmania, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 105:399-410. 2005
    ....
  6. ncbi Predictive modelling of the growth and survival of Listeria in fishery products
    T Ross
    School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 62:231-45. 2000
    ..All of these issues are the subject of ongoing research...
  7. ncbi Development of a predictive model to describe the effects of temperature and water activity on the growth of spoilage pseudomonads
    K Neumeyer
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 38:45-54. 1997
    ....
  8. pmc Modelling the growth rate of Escherichia coli as a function of pH and lactic acid concentration
    K A Presser
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Appl Environ Microbiol 63:2355-60. 1997
    ..However, for 0 to 100 mM lactic acid, the model described well the qualitative and quantitative features of the response...
  9. ncbi Effect of potassium lactate and a potassium lactate-sodium diacetate blend on Listeria monocytogenes growth in modified atmosphere packaged sliced ham
    L A Mellefont
    Australian Food Safety Centre of Excellence, Tasmanian Institute of Agricultural Research, School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 54, Hobart 7001, Tasmania, Australia
    J Food Prot 70:2297-305. 2007
    ..e., aerobic microflora and lactic acid bacteria. The influence of these compounds on the risk of listeriosis in relation to product shelf life is discussed...
  10. pmc Physicochemical parameters for growth of the sea ice bacteria Glaciecola punicea ACAM 611(T) and Gelidibacter sp. strain IC158
    D S Nichols
    School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia
    Appl Environ Microbiol 65:3757-60. 1999
    ..No such extension was observed for Gelidibacter sp. strain IC158 (a psychrotolerant bacterium) at analogous temperatures. Salinity and pH may be primary physicochemical parameters controlling bacterial community development in sea ice...
  11. ncbi Differentiation of the effects of lethal pH and water activity: food safety implications
    C Shadbolt
    School of Agricultural Science and Tasmanian Institute of Agricultural Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
    Lett Appl Microbiol 32:99-102. 2001
    ..90. It is hypothesized that pH stress constitutes a large energy drain on the cell and subsequently sensitizes it to other environmental constraints requiring expenditure of metabolic energy...
  12. ncbi The effect of abrupt osmotic shifts on the lag phase duration of physiologically distinct populations of Salmonella typhimurium
    L A Mellefont
    Centre for Food Safety and Quality, School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252 54, Hobart 7001, Tasmania, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 92:111-20. 2004
    ..However, the data indicate that turbidimetry may not accurately describe the lag phase response of exponential phase cells subjected to large osmotic shifts. Viable count data is required to investigate this hypothesis further...
  13. ncbi The effect of abrupt osmotic shifts on the lag phase duration of foodborne bacteria
    L A Mellefont
    Centre for Food Safety and Quality, School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252 54, Hobart 7001, Tasmania, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 83:281-93. 2003
    ....
  14. pmc Quantitative microbiology: a basis for food safety
    T A McMeekin
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Emerg Infect Dis 3:541-9. 1997
    ..Advances in controlling foodborne pathogens depend on understanding the pathogens' physiologic responses to growth constraints, including constraints conferring increased survival capacity...
  15. pmc Modelling the growth limits (growth/no growth interface) of Escherichia coli as a function of temperature, pH, lactic acid concentration, and water activity
    K A Presser
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Appl Environ Microbiol 64:1773-9. 1998
    ..The inhibitory effect of combinations of water activity and pH varied with temperature. Predictions of the model for the growth/no growth interface were consistent with 95% of the experimental data set...
  16. ncbi Information systems in food safety management
    T A McMeekin
    Australian Food Safety Centre of Excellence, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 112:181-94. 2006
    ..Provision of high quality, online educational packages to food industry personnel otherwise precluded from access to such courses...
  17. doi Use of bacteriophages as biocontrol agents to control Salmonella associated with seed sprouts
    C Kocharunchitt
    Tasmanian Institute of Agricultural Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart TAS 7001, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 128:453-9. 2009
    ..These factors may complicate the use of phages for biocontrol...
  18. ncbi The effect of abrupt shifts in temperature on the lag phase duration of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella oxytoca
    L A Mellefont
    Centre for Food Safety and Quality, School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252 54, Hobart 7001, Tasmania, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 83:295-305. 2003
    ..Deviation of the reported proportionality between lag time and generation time was observed when late-exponential phase cells were subjected to abrupt temperature shifts from beyond the normal physiological range...
  19. ncbi Shelf life prediction: status and future possibilities
    T A McMeekin
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 33:65-83. 1996
    ..Bioindicators' are identified as potential monitors of spoilage and suggestions made for their development based on the concept of 'upper limiting bacterial growth' rates, for which preliminary evidence is presented...
  20. doi Evaluation of thermal inactivation of Escherichia coli using microelectrode ion flux measurements with osmotic stress
    S Koseki
    Tasmanian Institute of Agricultural Research, School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Tasmania, Australia
    Lett Appl Microbiol 54:203-8. 2012
    ..To elucidate the potential use of microelectrode ion flux measurements to evaluate bacterial responses to heat treatment...
  21. doi Molecular analysis of the bacterial communities in the live Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and the influence of postharvest temperature on its structure
    J Fernandez-Piquer
    Australian Seafood Cooperative Research Centre and the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia
    J Appl Microbiol 112:1134-43. 2012
    ..To evaluate the effect of postharvest temperature on bacterial communities in live Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) using nonculture-based methods...
  22. ncbi Development and evaluation of a predictive model for the effect of temperature and water activity on the growth rate of Vibrio parahaemolyticus
    D W Miles
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 38:133-42. 1997
    ..The model was shown to give realistic growth estimates, with a bias value of 1.01, and an accuracy factor of 1.38...
  23. ncbi Nonthermal death of Escherichia coli
    C T Shadbolt
    School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 49:129-38. 1999
    ..Addition of chloramphenicol to the suspending medium reduced the tailing effect and suggested that tailing was caused by de novo protein synthesis...
  24. ncbi Effect of suspension media on nonthermal inactivation of Escherichia coli
    O J McQuestin
    Australian Food Safety Centre of Excellence, School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
    Lett Appl Microbiol 43:523-7. 2006
    ..To investigate the influence of suspension media on the survival of Escherichia coli M23 exposed to nonthermal, lethal stresses...
  25. ncbi Acid habituation of Escherichia coli and the potential role of cyclopropane fatty acids in low pH tolerance
    J L Brown
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Australia brown
    Int J Food Microbiol 37:163-73. 1997
    ..The results presented illustrate the remarkable capacity of E. coli to adapt to environmental challenges, and have significant implications for the survival of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria, and hence for food safety...
  26. ncbi Ecophysiology of food-borne pathogens: Essential knowledge to improve food safety
    T A McMeekin
    Food Safety Centre, Tasmanian Institute of Agricultural Research, School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 139:S64-78. 2010
    ..Decision-support technologies reporting in real-time appear to have potential to make objective food safety decisions thereby reducing the impact of human indifference to the application of simple, but effective, food hygiene rules...
  27. ncbi Measurements of net fluxes and extracellular changes of H+, Ca2+, K+, and NH4+ in Escherichia coli using ion-selective microelectrodes
    L Shabala
    School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252 54, TAS 7001, Hobart, Australia
    J Microbiol Methods 46:119-29. 2001
    ..Applications of the non-invasive ion-selective microelectrode technique in microbiology are discussed...
  28. ncbi Modelling the effects of temperature, water activity, pH and lactic acid concentration on the growth rate of Escherichia coli
    T Ross
    Centre for Food Safety and Quality, School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252 54, Hobart 7001, Tasmania, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 82:33-43. 2003
    ..e. >0.998). All data used to generate the model are presented. The model provides an excellent description of the experimental data...
  29. ncbi Predictive microbiology: providing a knowledge-based framework for change management
    T A McMeekin
    Centre for Food Safety and Quality, School of Agricultural Science and Tasmanian Institute of Agricultural Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 78:133-53. 2002
    ....
  30. ncbi A process risk model for the shelf life of Atlantic salmon fillets
    S K J Rasmussen
    School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 73:47-60. 2002
    ..31 log10 cfu/cm2 on the fish surface and 3.23 log10 cfu/cm2 on the observed. The average predicted shelf life is 6.5 days, compared to an observed value of 6.2 days at 4 degrees C...
  31. pmc Salt, alone or in combination with sucrose, can improve the survival of Escherichia coli O157 (SERL 2) in model acidic sauces
    B Chapman
    Australian Food Safety Centre of Excellence, Food Science Australia, New South Wales, Australia
    Appl Environ Microbiol 72:5165-72. 2006
    ....
  32. ncbi Predictive microbiology: towards the interface and beyond
    T A McMeekin
    School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 73:395-407. 2002
    ..Attention is also drawn to the interfaces of predictive microbiology with microbial physiology, information technology and food safety initiatives such as HACCP and risk assessment...
  33. ncbi [Assessment and treatment of sexual offenders]
    Friedemann Pfafflin
    Universitat, Ulm, BRD
    Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz 50:44-51. 2007
    ..and more general psychotherapy modules (anger management, substance abuse, social skills training, etc.). Advantages and disadvantages of these programs are named and discussed...
  34. ncbi Genotypic diversity of Escherichia coli isolated from cecal content and mucosa of one- to six-week-old broilers
    R D Joerger
    Department of Animal and Food Sciences, University of Delaware, Townsend Hall, Newark, Delaware 19716 1303, USA
    Poult Sci 84:1902-7. 2005
    ..Evidence for the preferential localization of specific E. coli within the cecal mucosa was not found, and therefore a range of E. coli must be able to associate tightly with the cecal mucosa...
  35. ncbi Interactions between metabolic status, pre-breeding protein supplementation, uterine pH, and embrionic mortality in ewes: preliminary observations
    C A Meza-Herrera
    Unidad Regional Universitaria de Zonas Aridas, Universidad Autonoma Chapingo, Mexico
    Trop Anim Health Prod 38:407-13. 2006
    ..Neither BC nor PL affected CLN, CL weight or P4 release (p > 0.10). While the lowest UpH (p = 0.04) was observed in the HP-supplemented ewes, this group also showed the lowest fertility and the highest embryonic mortality...