Lesley J Rogers

Summary

Affiliation: University of New England
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. pmc Clever strategists: Australian Magpies vary mobbing strategies, not intensity, relative to different species of predator
    A Koboroff
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Australia
    Peerj 1:e56. 2013
  2. pmc A right antenna for social behaviour in honeybees
    Lesley J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2450, Australia
    Sci Rep 3:2045. 2013
  3. ncbi request reprint Light experience and the development of behavioural lateralization in chicks III. Learning to distinguish pebbles from grains
    L J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Behav Brain Res 177:61-9. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Corticosterone treatment of the chick embryo affects light-stimulated development of the thalamofugal visual pathway
    L J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Behav Brain Res 159:63-71. 2005
  5. pmc Advantages of having a lateralized brain
    Lesley J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 271:S420-2. 2004
  6. ncbi request reprint Factors influencing development of lateralization
    Lesley J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, Australia
    Cortex 42:107-9. 2006
  7. ncbi request reprint Lateralized response of chicks to magnetic cues
    Lesley J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Behav Brain Res 186:66-71. 2008
  8. doi request reprint Development and function of lateralization in the avian brain
    Lesley J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Brain Res Bull 76:235-44. 2008
  9. pmc From antenna to antenna: lateral shift of olfactory memory recall by honeybees
    Lesley J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, Australia
    PLoS ONE 3:e2340. 2008
  10. ncbi request reprint Sexing the brain: the science and pseudoscience of sex differences
    Lesley J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
    Kaohsiung J Med Sci 26:S4-9. 2010

Detail Information

Publications56

  1. pmc Clever strategists: Australian Magpies vary mobbing strategies, not intensity, relative to different species of predator
    A Koboroff
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Australia
    Peerj 1:e56. 2013
    ..Our results show that, in contrast to findings in other species, magpies vary mobbing strategy depending on the predator rather than varying mobbing intensity...
  2. pmc A right antenna for social behaviour in honeybees
    Lesley J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2450, Australia
    Sci Rep 3:2045. 2013
    ..Hence, RA controls social behaviour appropriate to context. Therefore, in invertebrates, as well as vertebrates, lateral biases in behaviour appear to be associated with requirements of social life. ..
  3. ncbi request reprint Light experience and the development of behavioural lateralization in chicks III. Learning to distinguish pebbles from grains
    L J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Behav Brain Res 177:61-9. 2007
    ..Changes confined to the RE system, therefore, affect behaviour independently of lateralization of the ability to inhibit inappropriate response...
  4. ncbi request reprint Corticosterone treatment of the chick embryo affects light-stimulated development of the thalamofugal visual pathway
    L J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Behav Brain Res 159:63-71. 2005
    ..The results are considered with respect to maternal deposits of the hormone in the yolk and pre-hatching stress of the embryo...
  5. pmc Advantages of having a lateralized brain
    Lesley J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 271:S420-2. 2004
    ..This finding suggests that cerebral lateralization enhances brain efficiency in cognitive tasks that demand the simultaneous but different use of both hemispheres...
  6. ncbi request reprint Factors influencing development of lateralization
    Lesley J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, Australia
    Cortex 42:107-9. 2006
  7. ncbi request reprint Lateralized response of chicks to magnetic cues
    Lesley J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Behav Brain Res 186:66-71. 2008
    ..The different behaviour of the chicks using their left eye might not be a matter of a right eye-left hemisphere specialization for detecting magnetic directions, but of hemispheric specialization for attending to specific types of cues...
  8. doi request reprint Development and function of lateralization in the avian brain
    Lesley J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Brain Res Bull 76:235-44. 2008
    ..Differences between lateralization in the chick and pigeon are discussed...
  9. pmc From antenna to antenna: lateral shift of olfactory memory recall by honeybees
    Lesley J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, Australia
    PLoS ONE 3:e2340. 2008
    ..These findings therefore seem to call for remarkable parallel evolution and suggest that the proper functioning of memory formation in a bilateral animal, either vertebrate or invertebrate, requires lateralization of processing...
  10. ncbi request reprint Sexing the brain: the science and pseudoscience of sex differences
    Lesley J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
    Kaohsiung J Med Sci 26:S4-9. 2010
    ..The biology and behavior of humans is dynamic and flexible and need not restrict women to inferior positions in society...
  11. pmc Hand and paw preferences in relation to the lateralized brain
    Lesley J Rogers
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales 2351, Australia
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 364:943-54. 2009
    ..Recent findings of differences in brain structure between left- and right-handed primates (e.g. somatosensory cortex in marmosets) have been discussed and related to potential evolutionary advances...
  12. ncbi request reprint Light experience and the development of behavioural lateralisation in chicks. II. Choice of familiar versus unfamiliar model social partner
    Richard J Andrew
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, School of Biological, Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Building W28, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Behav Brain Res 155:67-76. 2004
    ..The effects of exposure are discussed as an example of the generation of a range of behavioural phenotypes, which are sustained within a single population by varying or frequency-dependent selection...
  13. ncbi request reprint Hemispheric specialization and dual processing in strongly versus weakly lateralized chicks
    M Dharmaretnam
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, Building W28, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Behav Brain Res 162:62-70. 2005
    ..We have shown that superior performance on the dual task results from the ability to allocate food searching to one hemisphere (left) and predator vigilance to the other (right) hemisphere, achieved only by Li chicks...
  14. ncbi request reprint Different responses in two strains of chickens (Gallus gallus) in a magnetic orientation test
    Rafael Freire
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, 2351, Australia
    Anim Cogn 11:547-52. 2008
    ..It therefore appears possible that the selection of the broiler strain has led to the elimination of the specific ability to respond to magnetic cues in the test situation...
  15. ncbi request reprint Differences in social and vocal behavior between left- and right-handed common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)
    Dianne J Gordon
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behavior, School of Science and Technology, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2350, Australia
    J Comp Psychol 124:402-11. 2010
    ..Hence, hand preference is associated with differences in exploratory and social behavior, the latter including vocal communication...
  16. doi request reprint Hemispheric specialization in Australian magpies (Gymnorhina tibicen) shown as eye preferences during response to a predator
    Adam Koboroff
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, School of Science and Technology, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Brain Res Bull 76:304-6. 2008
    ..Alert inspection involves detailed examination of the predator and likely high levels of fear, known to be right hemisphere function...
  17. ncbi request reprint Glutamate affects the development of the thalamofugal visual projection of the chick
    M D Khyentse
    Department of Physiology, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
    Neurosci Lett 230:65-8. 1997
    ..Glutamate prevented the development of the structural asymmetry which is present in control chicks. The resultant symmetry of the thalamofugal projections in glutamate-treated chicks may cause deficits in visual discrimination...
  18. ncbi request reprint Chicks prefer to peck at insect-like elongated stimuli moving in a direction orthogonal to their longer axis
    Elena Clara
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Anim Cogn 12:755-65. 2009
    ..Sideways movement may constitute a crucial signal attracting chicks' attention and enhancing predatory responses possibly because of stronger stimulation of motion detectors...
  19. ncbi request reprint Complementary and lateralized forms of processing in Bufo marinus for novel and familiar prey
    Andrew Robins
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, School of Biological, Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Neurobiol Learn Mem 86:214-27. 2006
    ..We present a hypothesis explaining differences in hemispheric processing in toads responding to 'novel' and 'familiar' prey types, utilizing a range of long-term memories found to be lateralized in other vertebrates...
  20. doi request reprint Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri): a missing link in the evolution of complementary side biases for predator avoidance and prey capture
    G Lippolis
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, N S W, Australia
    Brain Behav Evol 73:295-303. 2009
    ..Hence, we conclude that it is a homologous pattern of lateralization that evolved in early aquatic vertebrates and was retained as they made the transition to land-dwelling tetrapods...
  21. ncbi request reprint Visuospatial reaching preferences of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus): an assessment of individual biases across a variety of tasks
    Michelle A Hook
    Centre of Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
    J Comp Psychol 122:41-51. 2008
    ..Given the apparent absence of a selective advantage for handedness, the authors suggest that hand preferences may reflect hemispheric dominance of other cognitive domains (i.e., temperament)...
  22. ncbi request reprint Prehatching visual experience and lateralization in the visual Wulst of the chick
    Chao Deng
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, School of Biological, Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, University of New England, Physiology Building, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Behav Brain Res 134:375-85. 2002
    ..Without this lateralized stimulation of light both the left and right Wulst regions are largely but not exactly equivalent...
  23. ncbi request reprint Sensitivity to testosterone varies with strain, sex, and site of action in chickens
    K Astiningsih
    Department of Physiology, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
    Physiol Behav 59:1085-91. 1996
    ..Alternatively, there may be strain, as well as sex, differences in the metabolism of testosterone...
  24. ncbi request reprint Light experience and lateralization of the two visual pathways in the chick
    L J Rogers
    Division of Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, School of Biological Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
    Behav Brain Res 98:277-87. 1999
    ..The slight asymmetry in the tectofugal projections may be determined by exposing the embryo to light just before hatching, as known to be the case for thalamofugal projections...
  25. ncbi request reprint Relationship between paw preference strength and noise phobia in Canis familiaris
    N J Branson
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behavior, School of Biological, Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    J Comp Psychol 120:176-83. 2006
    ..The authors note the similarity between their finding and the weaker hand preferences shown in humans suffering extreme levels of anxiety and suggest neural mechanisms that may be involved...
  26. ncbi request reprint Organization of intratelencephalic projections to the visual Wulst of the chick
    C Deng
    Division of Zoology, School of Biological Sciences, Physiology Building, University of New England, Armidale, Australia
    Brain Res 856:152-62. 2000
    ..The possible roles of these connections in regulating behaviour are discussed...
  27. ncbi request reprint Similarity of the song nuclei of male and female Australian magpies (Gymnorhina tibicen)
    C Deng
    Division of Zoology, School of Biological Sciences, University of New England, Physiology Building, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Behav Brain Res 123:89-102. 2001
    ..The HVC to RA projections were labelled anterogradely by DiI and DiA. However, no HVC to Area X projections were labeled by DiI or DiA, suggesting a possible difference from songbirds studied previously...
  28. ncbi request reprint Light exposure of the embryo and development of behavioural lateralisation in chicks, I: olfactory responses
    L J Rogers
    Division of Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, School of Biological Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
    Behav Brain Res 97:195-200. 1998
    ..When the clove oil odour was presented together with a less attractive, red bead, no significant lateralisation emerged. Light or dark experience prior to hatching had no effect on the lateralised performance of the blue-bead test...
  29. doi request reprint Contact calls of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus): influence of age of caller on antiphonal calling and other vocal responses
    H C Chen
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Am J Primatol 71:165-70. 2009
    ..This age-dependent effect was independent of kinship relations. This is the first evidence that marmosets distinguish age by vocal parameters alone and make social decisions based on age...
  30. ncbi request reprint Bilaterally projecting neurons in the two visual pathways of chicks
    C Deng
    Division of Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, School of Biological Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Brain Res 794:281-90. 1998
    ..The differences in the structural organization of the two visual pathways are discussed with reference to the transmission of information to higher centers on both sides of the brain...
  31. ncbi request reprint Pre- and post-hatching effects of corticosterone treatment on behavior of the domestic chick
    R Freire
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Australia
    Horm Behav 49:157-65. 2006
    ..This further supports the hypothesis that brain lateralization provides an advantage in performing more than one task simultaneously...
  32. ncbi request reprint Organisation of the tectorotundal and SP/IPS-rotundal projections in the chick
    C Deng
    Division of Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, School of Biological Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
    J Comp Neurol 394:171-85. 1998
    ..Thus, Rt and T receive topographically both tecto- (excitatory) and SP/IPS- (inhibitory) projections. The possible functional implications for parallel information processing in these projections are discussed...
  33. ncbi request reprint Differential contributions of the two visual pathways to functional lateralization in chicks
    C Deng
    Department of Physiology, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
    Behav Brain Res 87:173-82. 1997
    ..The forebrain region which receives input from the tectofugal visual system is involved in the control of attack responses only...
  34. ncbi request reprint Exposure to different wavelengths of light and the development of structural and functional asymmetries in the chicken
    L J Rogers
    Department of Physiology, University of New England, Armidale, N S W Australia
    Behav Brain Res 80:65-73. 1996
    ..Exposure of the embryos to red and green light alternating at 30 min intervals is as effective as "white' light for establishing both the structural and functional asymmetry...
  35. ncbi request reprint Evolution of hemispheric specialization: advantages and disadvantages
    L J Rogers
    Division of Zoology, University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia
    Brain Lang 73:236-53. 2000
    ..Nonlateralized chicks appear to perform these dual tasks less efficiently than lateralized ones. Reference is made to other species in discussing these results...
  36. ncbi request reprint Social mobbing calls in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus): effects of experience and associated cortisol levels
    Elena Clara
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, 2351, Australia
    Anim Cogn 11:349-58. 2008
    ....
  37. ncbi request reprint Asymmetry of flight and escape turning responses in horses
    N P Austin
    University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
    Laterality 12:464-74. 2007
    ..No population bias existed for the direction of escape turning, but horses that turned to the right when approached from the front were found to exhibit longer flight distances than those that turned to the left...
  38. ncbi request reprint NMDA receptor antagonists extend the sensitive period for imprinting
    C H Parsons
    Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, School of Biological Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
    Physiol Behav 68:749-53. 2000
    ..Chicks treated with MK-801 were also able to imprint on day 8. Thus, we have evidence that the NMDA receptor system is involved in the mechanisms that control the sensitive period for imprinting...
  39. ncbi request reprint Lateralisation of escape responses in the stripe-faced dunnart, Sminthopsis macroura (Dasyuridae: Marsupialia)
    Giuseppe Lippolis
    University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
    Laterality 10:457-70. 2005
    ..These results are consistent with the right hemisphere's known specialisation for controlling fear and escape responses. Our results suggest that marsupials are lateralised in a way similar to other vertebrates...
  40. ncbi request reprint Head-cocking as a form of exploration in the common marmoset and its development
    Gisela Kaplan
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Dev Psychobiol 48:551-60. 2006
    ..Head-cocking occurred at higher levels in marmosets receiving more anogenital licking. As this was associated positively with increased exploration, head-cocking may be regarded as an exploratory behavior...
  41. doi request reprint Perception of biological motion in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus): by females only
    J Brown
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, School of Science and Technology, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Anim Cogn 13:555-64. 2010
    ..Considered together with the findings of previous studies on chicks and humans, the results of the present study support the notion of a common mechanism across species for the detection of BM...
  42. ncbi request reprint Development of hand preferences in marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) and effects of aging
    M A Hook
    Department of Physiology, University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia
    J Comp Psychol 114:263-71. 2000
    ..These results are discussed in terms of motor development and hemispheric specialization...
  43. ncbi request reprint Light exposure of chick embryo influences lateralized recall of imprinting memory
    A N Johnston
    School of Biological Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia
    Behav Neurosci 113:1267-73. 1999
    ..The hemisphere used in recall of imprinting memory received indirect visual inputs and was determined by environmental stimulation (asymmetrical light input)...
  44. ncbi request reprint Pharmacological extension of the sensitive period for imprinting in Gallus domesticus
    C H Parsons
    Department of Physiology, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
    Physiol Behav 62:1303-10. 1997
    ..Chicks treated with KX at 20 or 40 h posthatching or on Day 4 or 7 as well as controls treated with pyrogen-free saline were unable to imprint on Day 8...
  45. ncbi request reprint Relative importance of odour and taste in the one-trial passive avoidance learning bead task
    T H Burne
    Department of Physiology, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
    Physiol Behav 62:1299-302. 1997
    ..There was no significant difference between the discrimination ratio of chicks trained with the odour, taste, or taste and odour of MeA. These results demonstrate that chicks can perform PAL using taste and/or odour cues...
  46. ncbi request reprint Exposure to light prior to hatching induces asymmetry of receptor binding in specific regions of the chick forebrain
    A N Johnston
    Department of Physiology, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
    Brain Res Dev Brain Res 103:83-90. 1997
    ..Thus, the presence and pattern of experience-dependent neurochemical asymmetries in the chick forebrain are specific to both region and receptor type...
  47. ncbi request reprint Limb use and preferences in wild orang-utans during feeding and locomotor behavior
    Helga H Peters
    School of Biological, Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia
    Am J Primatol 70:261-70. 2008
    ..Although not present for all tasks, the results indicate that orang-utans do show evidence of hemispheric specialization, but the use of the hands is not under a strong lateralized hemispheric control and is adaptable...
  48. ncbi request reprint Diurnal cycle in salivary cortisol levels in common marmosets
    Nicola Cross
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, School of Biological, Biomedical and Molecular Sciences University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
    Dev Psychobiol 45:134-9. 2004
    ..We found no effect of sex on cortisol levels across the cycle...
  49. ncbi request reprint Saliva sampling to assess cortisol levels in unrestrained common marmosets and the effect of behavioral stress
    N Cross
    Centre for Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, School of Biological, Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
    Am J Primatol 62:107-14. 2004
    ..Hence, this method of saliva sampling is a convenient, noninvasive means of assessing cortisol levels in marmosets...
  50. ncbi request reprint Light-dependent development of asymmetry in the ipsilateral and contralateral thalamofugal visual projections of the chick
    Mamiko Koshiba
    Division of Biochemistry and Cellular Biology, National Institute of Neuroscience, NCNP, Tokyo 187 8502, Japan
    Neurosci Lett 336:81-4. 2003
    ..We also show that the light stimulation causes lateralised expression of c-fos and receptors for neurotransmitters...
  51. ncbi request reprint Effects of light stimulation of embryos on the use of position-specific and object-specific cues in binocular and monocular domestic chicks (Gallus gallus)
    Cinzia Chiandetti
    Department of Psychology and B R A I N Centre for Neuroscience, University of Trieste, Via S Anastasio 12, 34123 Trieste, Italy
    Behav Brain Res 163:10-7. 2005
    ..These results suggest that light exposure of the embryo makes neural mechanisms that do not receive direct visual input (i.e., those of the occluded side) more available to be used in assessment of novelty...
  52. ncbi request reprint Chemosensory input and lateralization of brain function in the domestic chick
    Thomas H J Burne
    Centre of Neuroscience and Animal Behaviour, School of Biological, Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, The University of New England, Armidale 2351, Australia
    Behav Brain Res 133:293-300. 2002
    ..We suggest that differences in lateralized olfactory responses to different odours are affected by the relative involvement of intranasal olfactory and trigeminal chemoreceptors...
  53. ncbi request reprint Survival with an asymmetrical brain: advantages and disadvantages of cerebral lateralization
    Giorgio Vallortigara
    Department of Psychology and B R A I N Centre for Neuroscience, University of Trieste, 34123 Trieste, Italy
    Behav Brain Sci 28:575-89; discussion 589-633. 2005
    ....
  54. ncbi request reprint Chickens orient using a magnetic compass
    Rafael Freire
    Curr Biol 15:R620-1. 2005
  55. pmc Hemispheric specialization in dogs for processing different acoustic stimuli
    Marcello Siniscalchi
    Department of Animal Production, University of Bari, Bari, Italy
    PLoS ONE 3:e3349. 2008
    ..These findings suggest that the specialisation of the left hemisphere for intraspecific communication is more ancient that previously thought, and so is specialisation of the right hemisphere for intense emotions...