D A Ratkowsky

Summary

Affiliation: University of Tasmania
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Some examples of, and some problems with, the use of nonlinear logistic regression in predictive food microbiology
    D A Ratkowsky
    School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 73:119-25. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint Unifying temperature effects on the growth rate of bacteria and the stability of globular proteins
    David A Ratkowsky
    School of Agricultural Science and Australian Food Safety Centre of Excellence, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 54, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia
    J Theor Biol 233:351-62. 2005
  3. pmc Modelling the growth rate of Escherichia coli as a function of pH and lactic acid concentration
    K A Presser
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Appl Environ Microbiol 63:2355-60. 1997
  4. pmc Quantitative microbiology: a basis for food safety
    T A McMeekin
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Emerg Infect Dis 3:541-9. 1997
  5. ncbi request reprint Modelling the effects of temperature, water activity, pH and lactic acid concentration on the growth rate of Escherichia coli
    T Ross
    Centre for Food Safety and Quality, School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252 54, Hobart 7001, Tasmania, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 82:33-43. 2003
  6. pmc Modelling the growth limits (growth/no growth interface) of Escherichia coli as a function of temperature, pH, lactic acid concentration, and water activity
    K A Presser
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Appl Environ Microbiol 64:1773-9. 1998
  7. ncbi request reprint Milk composition and growth in wild and captive Tasmanian bettongs, Bettongia gaimardi (Marsupialia)
    R W Rose
    School of Zoology, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252 05, 7001 Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
    J Comp Physiol B 173:125-33. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint Predictive microbiology: towards the interface and beyond
    T A McMeekin
    School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 73:395-407. 2002

Detail Information

Publications8

  1. ncbi request reprint Some examples of, and some problems with, the use of nonlinear logistic regression in predictive food microbiology
    D A Ratkowsky
    School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 73:119-25. 2002
    ..As may be expected with a new statistical technique, some problems were encountered with the implementation of the modelling approach and these are discussed...
  2. ncbi request reprint Unifying temperature effects on the growth rate of bacteria and the stability of globular proteins
    David A Ratkowsky
    School of Agricultural Science and Australian Food Safety Centre of Excellence, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 54, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia
    J Theor Biol 233:351-62. 2005
    ..As these results mirror those obtained by biophysicists for globular proteins, it appears that the same or a similar mechanism applies to bacteria as applies to proteins...
  3. pmc Modelling the growth rate of Escherichia coli as a function of pH and lactic acid concentration
    K A Presser
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Appl Environ Microbiol 63:2355-60. 1997
    ..However, for 0 to 100 mM lactic acid, the model described well the qualitative and quantitative features of the response...
  4. pmc Quantitative microbiology: a basis for food safety
    T A McMeekin
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Emerg Infect Dis 3:541-9. 1997
    ..Advances in controlling foodborne pathogens depend on understanding the pathogens' physiologic responses to growth constraints, including constraints conferring increased survival capacity...
  5. ncbi request reprint Modelling the effects of temperature, water activity, pH and lactic acid concentration on the growth rate of Escherichia coli
    T Ross
    Centre for Food Safety and Quality, School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252 54, Hobart 7001, Tasmania, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 82:33-43. 2003
    ..coli data set because of the difficulty of generating data in the super-optimal water activity range (i.e. >0.998). All data used to generate the model are presented. The model provides an excellent description of the experimental data...
  6. pmc Modelling the growth limits (growth/no growth interface) of Escherichia coli as a function of temperature, pH, lactic acid concentration, and water activity
    K A Presser
    Department of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Appl Environ Microbiol 64:1773-9. 1998
    ..The inhibitory effect of combinations of water activity and pH varied with temperature. Predictions of the model for the growth/no growth interface were consistent with 95% of the experimental data set...
  7. ncbi request reprint Milk composition and growth in wild and captive Tasmanian bettongs, Bettongia gaimardi (Marsupialia)
    R W Rose
    School of Zoology, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252 05, 7001 Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
    J Comp Physiol B 173:125-33. 2003
    ..Thus differences in milk composition resulting from different planes of nutrition can lead to differences in growth rates of marsupial young...
  8. ncbi request reprint Predictive microbiology: towards the interface and beyond
    T A McMeekin
    School of Agricultural Science, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
    Int J Food Microbiol 73:395-407. 2002
    ..Attention is also drawn to the interfaces of predictive microbiology with microbial physiology, information technology and food safety initiatives such as HACCP and risk assessment...