A G Poore

Summary

Affiliation: University of New South Wales
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Major consequences of minor damage: impacts of small grazers on fast-growing kelps
    Alistair G B Poore
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, 2052, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Oecologia 174:789-801. 2014
  2. doi request reprint Direct and indirect effects of ocean acidification and warming on a marine plant-herbivore interaction
    Alistair G B Poore
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia
    Oecologia 173:1113-24. 2013
  3. doi request reprint Global patterns in the impact of marine herbivores on benthic primary producers
    Alistair G B Poore
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Ecol Lett 15:912-22. 2012
  4. ncbi request reprint Phylogenetic and geographic variation in host breadth and composition by herbivorous amphipods in the family Ampithoidae
    Alistair G B Poore
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre and School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Evolution 62:21-38. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint Host-plant adaptation in an herbivorous marine amphipod: genetic potential not realized in field populations
    A G Poore
    School of Biological Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
    Evolution 55:68-80. 2001
  6. ncbi request reprint Spatial associations among algae affect host use in a herbivorous marine amphipod
    Alistair G B Poore
    School of Biological Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, NSW, Sydney, Australia
    Oecologia 140:104-12. 2004
  7. ncbi request reprint Selection in modular organisms: is intraclonal variation in macroalgae evolutionarily important?
    Keyne Monro
    School of Biological, Earth, and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, New South Wales, Australia
    Am Nat 163:564-78. 2004
  8. doi request reprint Genetic variability in tolerance to copper contamination in a herbivorous marine invertebrate
    Ceiwen J Pease
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Aquat Toxicol 99:10-6. 2010
  9. doi request reprint Contamination of marine biogenic habitats and effects upon associated epifauna
    David A Roberts
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre and School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Mar Pollut Bull 56:1057-65. 2008
  10. doi request reprint Biomonitors and the assessment of ecological impacts: distribution of herbivorous epifauna in contaminated macroalgal beds
    David A Roberts
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Environ Pollut 156:489-503. 2008

Detail Information

Publications15

  1. doi request reprint Major consequences of minor damage: impacts of small grazers on fast-growing kelps
    Alistair G B Poore
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, 2052, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Oecologia 174:789-801. 2014
    ..The impacts of small herbivores on plant performance are thus not easily predicted from consumption rates or abundance in the field, and vary with plant species due to variation in their ability to compensate for damage. ..
  2. doi request reprint Direct and indirect effects of ocean acidification and warming on a marine plant-herbivore interaction
    Alistair G B Poore
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia
    Oecologia 173:1113-24. 2013
    ..These results indicate that, in addition to the direct effects on herbivore abundance, climatic stressors will affect the strength of plant-herbivore interactions by changes to the susceptibility of plant tissues to herbivory. ..
  3. doi request reprint Global patterns in the impact of marine herbivores on benthic primary producers
    Alistair G B Poore
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Ecol Lett 15:912-22. 2012
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Phylogenetic and geographic variation in host breadth and composition by herbivorous amphipods in the family Ampithoidae
    Alistair G B Poore
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre and School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Evolution 62:21-38. 2008
    ..This result suggests that an evolutionary advantage to metabolite tolerance in marine amphipods may be that it increases the availability of appropriate algal hosts (i.e., enlarges the resource base)...
  5. ncbi request reprint Host-plant adaptation in an herbivorous marine amphipod: genetic potential not realized in field populations
    A G Poore
    School of Biological Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
    Evolution 55:68-80. 2001
    ..Ecological factors that may explain the persistence of P. parmerong on P. crassa and the possibility of phylogenetic constraints on host use by P. parmerong are discussed...
  6. ncbi request reprint Spatial associations among algae affect host use in a herbivorous marine amphipod
    Alistair G B Poore
    School of Biological Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, NSW, Sydney, Australia
    Oecologia 140:104-12. 2004
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Selection in modular organisms: is intraclonal variation in macroalgae evolutionarily important?
    Keyne Monro
    School of Biological, Earth, and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, New South Wales, Australia
    Am Nat 163:564-78. 2004
    ....
  8. doi request reprint Genetic variability in tolerance to copper contamination in a herbivorous marine invertebrate
    Ceiwen J Pease
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Aquat Toxicol 99:10-6. 2010
    ..This study provides strong evidence for the potential of a marine invertebrate to evolve tolerance to contaminants found in their diet...
  9. doi request reprint Contamination of marine biogenic habitats and effects upon associated epifauna
    David A Roberts
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre and School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Mar Pollut Bull 56:1057-65. 2008
    ..When combined with manipulative field experiments such an approach would greatly assist in our understanding of indirect effects of contaminants in these important benthic habitats...
  10. doi request reprint Biomonitors and the assessment of ecological impacts: distribution of herbivorous epifauna in contaminated macroalgal beds
    David A Roberts
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Environ Pollut 156:489-503. 2008
    ..acts as a refuge from contaminants for epifauna. The contamination of macroalgae may pose threats to epifauna in harbours around the world...
  11. ncbi request reprint Field and laboratory simulations of storm water pulses: behavioural avoidance by marine epifauna
    David A Roberts
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
    Environ Pollut 152:153-62. 2008
    ..Results demonstrate the importance of examining the effects of pulsed contaminants under realistic exposure conditions and the need to consider ecologically relevant endpoints...
  12. ncbi request reprint MBACI sampling of an episodic disturbance: stormwater effects on algal epifauna
    David A Roberts
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
    Mar Environ Res 64:514-23. 2007
    ..Instead, effects were harbour-wide (i.e. at control and impact sites), probably in response to the physical disturbance of heavy seas associated with large rain events...
  13. ncbi request reprint Ecological consequences of copper contamination in macroalgae: effects on epifauna and associated herbivores
    David A Roberts
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia
    Environ Toxicol Chem 25:2470-9. 2006
    ..Heavy metal contamination of macroalgae is a widespread phenomenon that has the potential for substantial negative consequences for associated invertebrate fauna. This issue warrants further investigation by marine ecotoxicologists...
  14. doi request reprint The evolvability of growth form in a clonal seaweed
    Keyne Monro
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre and School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia
    Evolution 63:3147-57. 2009
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Spatial interactions within modular organisms: genetic heterogeneity and organism fitness
    Mario Pineda-Krch
    Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, 6270 University Boulevard, Vancouver BC, Canada V6J IV9
    Theor Popul Biol 66:25-36. 2004
    ..We conclude by discussing potential extension of the present framework to a general dynamic model of spatially structured organism development...