David A Pike

Summary

Affiliation: University of Sydney
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint The benefits of nest relocation extend far beyond recruitment: a rejoinder to Mrosovsky
    David A Pike
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales, 2006, Australia
    Environ Manage 41:461-4. 2008
  2. ncbi request reprint Estimating survival rates of uncatchable animals: the myth of high juvenile mortality in reptiles
    David A Pike
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Ecology 89:607-11. 2008
  3. pmc Natural beaches confer fitness benefits to nesting marine turtles
    David A Pike
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006, Australia
    Biol Lett 4:704-6. 2008
  4. pmc Habitat selection in a rocky landscape: experimentally decoupling the influence of retreat site attributes from that of landscape features
    Benjamin M Croak
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    PLoS ONE 7:e37982. 2012
  5. doi request reprint Offspring sex in a lizard depends on egg size
    Rajkumar S Radder
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Curr Biol 19:1102-5. 2009
  6. ncbi request reprint Removing forest canopy cover restores a reptile assemblage
    David A Pike
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 Australia
    Ecol Appl 21:274-80. 2011
  7. ncbi request reprint Sea turtle species vary in their susceptibility to tropical cyclones
    David A Pike
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Oecologia 153:471-8. 2007

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. ncbi request reprint The benefits of nest relocation extend far beyond recruitment: a rejoinder to Mrosovsky
    David A Pike
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, New South Wales, 2006, Australia
    Environ Manage 41:461-4. 2008
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint Estimating survival rates of uncatchable animals: the myth of high juvenile mortality in reptiles
    David A Pike
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Ecology 89:607-11. 2008
    ..Our analyses challenge the widely held belief that juvenile reptiles have low rates of annual survival and suggest instead that sampling problems and the elusive biology of juvenile reptiles have misled researchers in this respect...
  3. pmc Natural beaches confer fitness benefits to nesting marine turtles
    David A Pike
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006, Australia
    Biol Lett 4:704-6. 2008
    ..Consequently, populations nesting on natural beaches may be able to recover more quickly from the historic population declines that have plagued marine turtles, and some species may recover more quickly than others...
  4. pmc Habitat selection in a rocky landscape: experimentally decoupling the influence of retreat site attributes from that of landscape features
    Benjamin M Croak
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    PLoS ONE 7:e37982. 2012
    ..Standardized retreat sites can provide robust experimental data on the effects of landscape-scale attributes on retreat site selection, revealing interspecific divergences among sympatric taxa that use similar habitats...
  5. doi request reprint Offspring sex in a lizard depends on egg size
    Rajkumar S Radder
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Curr Biol 19:1102-5. 2009
    ..Remarkably, then, offspring sex in this species is the end result of an interaction between three mechanisms: sex chromosomes, nest temperatures, and yolk allocation...
  6. ncbi request reprint Removing forest canopy cover restores a reptile assemblage
    David A Pike
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 Australia
    Ecol Appl 21:274-80. 2011
    ..One such species is Australia's most endangered snake, the broadheaded snake (Hoplocephalus bungaroides)...
  7. ncbi request reprint Sea turtle species vary in their susceptibility to tropical cyclones
    David A Pike
    School of Biological Sciences A08, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Oecologia 153:471-8. 2007
    ..Our data clearly indicate that sympatric species using the same resources are affected differently by tropical cyclones due to slight variations in the seasonal timing of nesting, a key life history process...