Michael E R Nicholls

Summary

Affiliation: University of Melbourne
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Which cheek to turn? The effect of gender and emotional expressivity on posing behavior
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC, Australia
    Brain Cogn 48:480-4. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint The effect of body and environment-centred coordinates on free-viewing perceptual asymmetries for vertical and horizontal stimuli
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia
    Cortex 42:336-46. 2006
  3. doi request reprint Pseudoneglect for the bisection of mental number lines
    Andrea M Loftus
    School of Behavioural Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
    Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 62:925-45. 2009
  4. doi request reprint Prism adaptation overcomes pseudoneglect for the greyscales task
    Andrea M Loftus
    School of Behavioural Science, University of Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Cortex 45:537-43. 2009
  5. doi request reprint Somatosensory prior entry assessed with temporal order judgments and simultaneity judgments
    Mark J Yates
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
    Atten Percept Psychophys 73:1586-603. 2011
  6. doi request reprint Rightward collisions and their association with pseudoneglect
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Swanston Street, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
    Brain Cogn 68:166-70. 2008
  7. ncbi request reprint The effect of strategy on pseudoneglect for luminance judgements
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
    Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 25:71-7. 2005
  8. ncbi request reprint An investigation of the relationship between free-viewing perceptual asymmetries for vertical and horizontal stimuli
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Swanston St, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
    Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 19:289-301. 2004
  9. ncbi request reprint Hemispheric asymmetries for temporal information processing: transient detection versus sustained monitoring
    Matia Okubo
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
    Brain Cogn 66:168-75. 2008
  10. ncbi request reprint A stimulus-dependent dissociation between the cerebral hemispheres under free-viewing conditions
    Matia Okubo
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
    Exp Brain Res 172:49-56. 2006

Detail Information

Publications44

  1. ncbi request reprint Which cheek to turn? The effect of gender and emotional expressivity on posing behavior
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC, Australia
    Brain Cogn 48:480-4. 2002
    ..These results support the proposition that the leftward bias in painted portraits is related to a desire to capture the emotive qualities of the left side of the face...
  2. ncbi request reprint The effect of body and environment-centred coordinates on free-viewing perceptual asymmetries for vertical and horizontal stimuli
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia
    Cortex 42:336-46. 2006
    ..The possibility that the neural basis for the biases lies in the inter-modal centres of the intraparietal region of the right hemisphere is discussed...
  3. doi request reprint Pseudoneglect for the bisection of mental number lines
    Andrea M Loftus
    School of Behavioural Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
    Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 62:925-45. 2009
    ..The bias mirrors pseudoneglect for physical lines and most likely reflects an expansion of the space occupied by lower numbers on the left side of the line and a contraction of space for higher numbers located on the right...
  4. doi request reprint Prism adaptation overcomes pseudoneglect for the greyscales task
    Andrea M Loftus
    School of Behavioural Science, University of Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Cortex 45:537-43. 2009
    ..The findings demonstrate that a simple visuomotor task can alter the distribution of spatial attention for the greyscales task in normal participants...
  5. doi request reprint Somatosensory prior entry assessed with temporal order judgments and simultaneity judgments
    Mark J Yates
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
    Atten Percept Psychophys 73:1586-603. 2011
    ..Additional experiments (TOJ and SJ) using visual cues established that the earlier perception of cued tactile targets does not result from intramodal sensory interactions between tactile cues and targets...
  6. doi request reprint Rightward collisions and their association with pseudoneglect
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Swanston Street, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
    Brain Cogn 68:166-70. 2008
    ..Finally, this study showed an association for the first time between biases in observable bumping and line bisection performance-suggesting that unilateral bumping is related to pseudoneglect...
  7. ncbi request reprint The effect of strategy on pseudoneglect for luminance judgements
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
    Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 25:71-7. 2005
    ..The results demonstrate that both strategies contribute to pseudoneglect--though the global strategy may produce stronger pseudoneglect...
  8. ncbi request reprint An investigation of the relationship between free-viewing perceptual asymmetries for vertical and horizontal stimuli
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Swanston St, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
    Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 19:289-301. 2004
    ..Potential applications of these findings to the remediation of spatial neglect are discussed...
  9. ncbi request reprint Hemispheric asymmetries for temporal information processing: transient detection versus sustained monitoring
    Matia Okubo
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
    Brain Cogn 66:168-75. 2008
    ..e. noise trials) or was placed toward the end of the presentation. The RH may therefore be more efficient in the sustained monitoring of visual temporal information whereas the LH is more efficient for transient detection...
  10. ncbi request reprint A stimulus-dependent dissociation between the cerebral hemispheres under free-viewing conditions
    Matia Okubo
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
    Exp Brain Res 172:49-56. 2006
    ..However, the fact that the rightward bias was: (a) weaker than the leftward bias and, (b) reduced by increases in length, demonstrates that RH spatial attention mechanisms are also important...
  11. doi request reprint Somatosensory prior entry
    Mark J Yates
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Atten Percept Psychophys 71:847-59. 2009
    ..The present study, which extends this result to somatosensory perception, indicates that the phenomenon may represent a more global feature of the perceptual system, which is possibly mediated by a common modality-independent mechanism...
  12. ncbi request reprint Attentional deployment in visual half-field tasks: the effect of cue position on word naming latency
    Annukka K Lindell
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
    Brain Cogn 53:273-7. 2003
    ..These findings suggest that differences in attentional deployment contribute to hemispheric asymmetries for word recognition...
  13. ncbi request reprint Asymmetries for the visual expression and perception of speech
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
    Brain Lang 97:322-31. 2006
    ..The asymmetries are most likely driven by left hemisphere specialization for language, which causes a rightward motoric bias...
  14. ncbi request reprint Satisfaction guaranteed: the effect of spatial biases on responses to likert scales
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
    Psychol Sci 17:1027-8. 2006
  15. ncbi request reprint Sequential processing in hemispheric word recognition: the impact of initial letter discriminability on the OUP naming effect
    Annukka K Lindell
    University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
    Brain Lang 93:160-72. 2005
    ..These findings confirm the presence of sequential processes in both left and right hemisphere word recognition, casting doubt on parallel models of word processing...
  16. ncbi request reprint Are object- and space-based attentional biases both important to free-viewing perceptual asymmetries?
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, 3010, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
    Exp Brain Res 154:513-20. 2004
    ..The results can be explained by a combination of space- and object-based biases or by space-based biases alone and are discussed with reference to a variety of models, which describe the distribution of attention across space...
  17. doi request reprint Pseudoneglect for mental alphabet lines is affected by prismatic adaptation
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic, 3010, Australia
    Exp Brain Res 191:109-15. 2008
    ..The results replicate an effect observed for mental number lines and demonstrate that low-level sensory-motor shifts can correct attentional biases associated with high-level representations, such as letters...
  18. doi request reprint The highs and lows of the interaction between word meaning and space
    Therese Thornton
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 39:964-73. 2013
    ..Consequently, the results of the four experiments in the current study point to a dominant role of response-selection processes in the genesis of space-object word interactions...
  19. ncbi request reprint Left to right: representational biases for numbers and the effect of visuomotor adaptation
    Andrea M Loftus
    School of Behavioural Science, University of Melbourne, VIC 3056, Australia
    Cognition 107:1048-58. 2008
    ..The findings demonstrate that a simple visuomotor task alters the representation of space on the mental number line in normal participants...
  20. ncbi request reprint Things that go bump in the right: the effect of unimanual activity on rightward collisions
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
    Neuropsychologia 45:1122-6. 2007
    ..Biases in bumping, however, were not related to biases in line bisection. The effect of hand-movement demonstrates that bumping is brought about by an imbalance of activation between the hemispheres...
  21. doi request reprint Spatial cues affect mental number line bisections
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic, Australia
    Exp Psychol 57:315-9. 2010
    ..The effect of cueing may reflect common activation of overlapping neural circuits that are thought to underlie attention in physical and representational space...
  22. ncbi request reprint Left of centre: asymmetries for the horizontal vertical line illusion
    Elisha K Josev
    Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
    Psychol Res 75:435-43. 2011
    ..The HVI is affected by asymmetries in length judgements and susceptibility to illusions and may provide interesting insights into attentional disorders in clinical populations, such as neglect...
  23. doi request reprint Lucky numbers: spatial neglect affects physical, but not representational, choices in a lotto task
    Tobias Loetscher
    School of Behavioural Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia
    Cortex 46:685-90. 2010
    ..These results demonstrate that the magnetic attraction towards the right side of mental representations is rather weak and that representational forms of neglect only occasionally co-exist with neglect in physical space...
  24. ncbi request reprint The greyscales task: a perceptual measure of attentional bias following unilateral hemispheric damage
    Jason B Mattingley
    Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia
    Neuropsychologia 42:387-94. 2004
    ....
  25. ncbi request reprint The effect of orthographic uniqueness and deviation points on lexical decisions: evidence from unilateral and bilateral-redundant presentations
    Annukka K Lindell
    Department of Psychology, School of Behavioural Science, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Q J Exp Psychol A 56:287-307. 2003
    ..Overall, the results were interpreted as being consistent with predictions of a cohort model of word recognition, and they highlighted the effect of stimulus orientation on left and right hemisphere word recognition...
  26. ncbi request reprint The relationship between hand preference, hand performance, and general cognitive ability
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
    J Int Neuropsychol Soc 16:585-92. 2010
    ..Although this study demonstrates that handedness is related to cognitive ability, the effects are subtle and might only be identified in large-scale studies with sensitive measures of hand performance...
  27. ncbi request reprint Pseudoneglect and neglect for mental alphabet lines
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
    Brain Res 1152:130-8. 2007
    ..The data demonstrate that letters have a left-to-right mental representation and that the left side of this representation is overrepresented in a manner similar to the overestimation associated with pseudoneglect for physical stimuli...
  28. ncbi request reprint Trunk- and head-centred spatial coordinates do not affect free-viewing perceptual asymmetries
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic, Australia
    Brain Cogn 53:247-52. 2003
    ..No effect of rotation was observed. It was concluded that the leftward bias for the greyscales task could be based on an object-centred attentional bias or left-to-right eye scanning habits...
  29. ncbi request reprint Read my lips: asymmetries in the visual expression and perception of speech revealed through the McGurk effect
    Michael E R Nicholls
    University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
    Psychol Sci 15:138-41. 2004
    ..Thus, observers attend more to what they think is the right side of the speaker's mouth. Asymmetries in mouth movements may reflect the gestural origins of language, which are also right lateralized...
  30. ncbi request reprint Look, no hands: a perceptual task shows that number magnitude induces shifts of attention
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
    Psychon Bull Rev 15:413-8. 2008
    ..Understanding the time course of number-space effects may, therefore, be important to the debate associated with response selection...
  31. ncbi request reprint The nature and contribution of space- and object-based attentional biases to free-viewing perceptual asymmetries
    Catherine A Orr
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, 3010, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
    Exp Brain Res 162:384-93. 2005
    ..The results are discussed with reference to a variety of models of the distribution of attention across space...
  32. ncbi request reprint Hemispheric asymmetries for visual and auditory temporal processing: an evoked potential study
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia
    Int J Psychophysiol 44:37-55. 2002
    ..These results confirm the importance of the left hemisphere for temporal processing and demonstrate that it is not the result of a hemispatial attentional bias or a peripheral sensory asymmetry...
  33. ncbi request reprint Hemispheric asymmetry in temporal resolution: contribution of the magnocellular pathway
    Matia Okubo
    Sophia University, Tokyo, Japan
    Psychon Bull Rev 12:755-9. 2005
    ..Because the red background attenuates functions of the magnocellular pathway, these results suggest that the magnocellular pathway contributes to the LH advantage for fine temporal resolution...
  34. ncbi request reprint A new means of measuring index/ring finger (2D:4D) ratio and its association with gender and hand preference
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Australia
    Laterality 13:71-91. 2008
    ..We conclude that the tubes technique provides an effective and easy-to-use means of measuring finger length, which can be administered in a classroom setting...
  35. ncbi request reprint Magical ideation and its relation to lateral preference
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Laterality 10:503-15. 2005
    ..The results support research linking schizotypal personality to ambidextrality and weak cerebral dominance and demonstrate that the association extends to modalities other than hand preference...
  36. ncbi request reprint Can free-viewing perceptual asymmetries be explained by scanning, pre-motor or attentional biases?
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia
    Cortex 38:113-36. 2002
    ..Whether or not unilateral hemispheric activation provides an adequate account of this attentional bias is discussed...
  37. ncbi request reprint Flexible contrast gain control in the right hemisphere
    Matia Okubo
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Australia
    Brain Cogn 59:269-76. 2005
    ..The results therefore suggest that the right hemisphere is able to process spatial frequency information across a wider range of contrast levels than is the left hemisphere...
  38. ncbi request reprint Cortical representation of the fovea: implications for visual half-field research
    Annukka K Lindell
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Cortex 39:111-7; discussion 118-20. 2003
  39. pmc Detecting hemifacial asymmetries in emotional expression with three-dimensional computerized image analysis
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 271:663-8. 2004
    ..The fact that the effect of valence was not captured by the movement analysis demonstrates that subtle movements can have a strong effect on the expression of emotion...
  40. ncbi request reprint The effect of word length on hemispheric word recognition: evidence from unilateral and bilateral-redundant presentations
    Annukka K Lindell
    Department of Psychology, School of Behavioral Science, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
    Brain Cogn 48:447-52. 2002
    ..Overall, the pattern of results supports the notion that the left hemisphere's superior linguistic capacity results from a more parallel processing strategy, while the right hemisphere is reliant upon a more sequential mechanism...
  41. ncbi request reprint The effect of left and right poses on the expression of facial emotion
    Michael E R Nicholls
    Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic, Australia
    Neuropsychologia 40:1662-5. 2002
    ..The relevance of these findings to painted portraits, which feature the left hemiface more than the right, is discussed...
  42. doi request reprint Numerical processing overcomes left neglect for the greyscales task
    Andrea M Loftus
    School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia
    Neuroreport 19:835-8. 2008
    ..The results demonstrate that the spatial architecture of numbers induces shifts of attention, which can overcome left neglect...
  43. ncbi request reprint Enhanced P1-N1 auditory evoked potential in patients with musicians' cramp
    Vanessa K Lim
    Department of Psychology, Unviersity of Auckland, New Zealand
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1060:349-59. 2005
    ..Thus, this study provides further evidence that patients with focal dystonia have alterations of the central nervous system that are not limited to their symptomatic sensory domain...
  44. ncbi request reprint Perceptual differences in sequential stimuli across patients with musician's and writer's cramp
    Vanessa K Lim
    University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
    Mov Disord 18:1286-93. 2003
    ..This timing problem is likely to be a consequence of the dystonic symptoms rather than the cause...