Colin R McHenry

Summary

Affiliation: University of Newcastle
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. ncbi Bottom-feeding plesiosaurs
    Colin R McHenry
    School of Environmental and Life Sciences Geology University of Newcastle, New South Wales 2308, Australia
    Science 310:75. 2005
  2. ncbi Biomechanics of the rostrum in crocodilians: a comparative analysis using finite-element modeling
    Colin R McHenry
    School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
    Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 288:827-49. 2006
  3. ncbi Supermodeled sabercat, predatory behavior in Smilodon fatalis revealed by high-resolution 3D computer simulation
    Colin R McHenry
    School of Engineering, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:16010-5. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications3

  1. ncbi Bottom-feeding plesiosaurs
    Colin R McHenry
    School of Environmental and Life Sciences Geology University of Newcastle, New South Wales 2308, Australia
    Science 310:75. 2005
    ..These finds point to a wider niche than has previously been supposed for these seemingly specialized predators and may also influence long-running controversy over the question of gastrolith function in plesiosaurs...
  2. ncbi Biomechanics of the rostrum in crocodilians: a comparative analysis using finite-element modeling
    Colin R McHenry
    School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
    Anat Rec A Discov Mol Cell Evol Biol 288:827-49. 2006
    ..This observation has important implications for our understanding of biomechanics in crocodilians and other aquatic reptiles...
  3. ncbi Supermodeled sabercat, predatory behavior in Smilodon fatalis revealed by high-resolution 3D computer simulation
    Colin R McHenry
    School of Engineering, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:16010-5. 2007
    ..leo may be required for extended, asphyxiating bites and that the relatively low bite forces in S. fatalis might reflect its ability to kill large prey more quickly, avoiding the need for prolonged bites...