Hamish McCallum

Summary

Affiliation: University of Tasmania
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease: lessons for conservation biology
    Hamish McCallum
    School of Zoology, The University of Tasmania, Private Bag 5, Hobart 7000, Australia
    Trends Ecol Evol 23:631-7. 2008
  2. doi request reprint Six degrees of Apodemus separation
    Hamish McCallum
    School of Zoology, University of Tasmania, TAS, Australia
    J Anim Ecol 78:891-3. 2009
  3. ncbi request reprint Transmission dynamics of Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease may lead to disease-induced extinction
    Hamish McCallum
    School of Zoology, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 5, Hobart 7001 Tasmania, Australia
    Ecology 90:3379-92. 2009
  4. doi request reprint Reduced effect of Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease at the disease front
    Rodrigo Hamede
    School of Zoology, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 5, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia
    Conserv Biol 26:124-34. 2012
  5. pmc Life-history change in disease-ravaged Tasmanian devil populations
    Menna E Jones
    School of Zoology, University of Tasmania, Hobart TAS 7001, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:10023-7. 2008
  6. doi request reprint Biting injuries and transmission of Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease
    Rodrigo K Hamede
    School of Zoology, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 5, Hobart, TAS, 7001, Australia
    J Anim Ecol 82:182-90. 2013
  7. doi request reprint Contact networks in a wild Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) population: using social network analysis to reveal seasonal variability in social behaviour and its implications for transmission of devil facial tumour disease
    Rodrigo K Hamede
    School of Zoology, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia
    Ecol Lett 12:1147-57. 2009

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. doi request reprint Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease: lessons for conservation biology
    Hamish McCallum
    School of Zoology, The University of Tasmania, Private Bag 5, Hobart 7000, Australia
    Trends Ecol Evol 23:631-7. 2008
    ....
  2. doi request reprint Six degrees of Apodemus separation
    Hamish McCallum
    School of Zoology, University of Tasmania, TAS, Australia
    J Anim Ecol 78:891-3. 2009
    ..They found that the method producing the most informative data depended on population density. However, all networks had aggregated contact distributions, which is important for understanding disease transmission...
  3. ncbi request reprint Transmission dynamics of Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease may lead to disease-induced extinction
    Hamish McCallum
    School of Zoology, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 5, Hobart 7001 Tasmania, Australia
    Ecology 90:3379-92. 2009
    ....
  4. doi request reprint Reduced effect of Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease at the disease front
    Rodrigo Hamede
    School of Zoology, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 5, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia
    Conserv Biol 26:124-34. 2012
    ..Such assisted selection has rarely been attempted for the management of wildlife diseases, but it may be widely applicable...
  5. pmc Life-history change in disease-ravaged Tasmanian devil populations
    Menna E Jones
    School of Zoology, University of Tasmania, Hobart TAS 7001, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:10023-7. 2008
    ..The persistence of both this disease and the associated life-history changes pose questions about longer-term evolutionary responses and conservation prospects for this iconic species...
  6. doi request reprint Biting injuries and transmission of Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease
    Rodrigo K Hamede
    School of Zoology, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 5, Hobart, TAS, 7001, Australia
    J Anim Ecol 82:182-90. 2013
    ..Our study emphasizes the importance of longitudinal studies of individually marked animals for understanding the ecology and transmission dynamics of infectious diseases and parasites in wild populations...
  7. doi request reprint Contact networks in a wild Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) population: using social network analysis to reveal seasonal variability in social behaviour and its implications for transmission of devil facial tumour disease
    Rodrigo K Hamede
    School of Zoology, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia
    Ecol Lett 12:1147-57. 2009
    ..Our results suggest that there is limited potential to control the disease by targeting highly connected age or sex classes...