Matthew J Hornsey

Summary

Affiliation: University of Queensland
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Criticizing groups from the inside and the outside: an identity perspective on the intergroup sensitivity effect
    Matthew J Hornsey
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 30:365-83. 2004
  2. ncbi request reprint The effects of status on subgroup relations
    Matthew J Hornsey
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Australia
    Br J Soc Psychol 41:203-18. 2002
  3. doi request reprint Group processes and outcomes in group psychotherapy: is it time to let go of "cohesiveness"?
    Matthew J Hornsey
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia 4072, Queensland, Australia
    Int J Group Psychother 59:267-78. 2009
  4. ncbi request reprint Group-directed criticisms and recommendations for change: why newcomers arouse more resistance than old-timers
    Matthew J Hornsey
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 33:1036-48. 2007
  5. ncbi request reprint The individual within the group: balancing the need to belong with the need to be different
    Matthew J Hornsey
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia
    Pers Soc Psychol Rev 8:248-64. 2004
  6. ncbi request reprint Relations between high and low power groups: the importance of legitimacy
    Matthew J Hornsey
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Australia
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 29:216-27. 2003
  7. ncbi request reprint Linking superiority bias in the interpersonal and intergroup domains
    Matthew J Hornsey
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia
    J Soc Psychol 143:479-91. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint On being loud and proud: non-conformity and counter-conformity to group norms
    Matthew J Hornsey
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Australia
    Br J Soc Psychol 42:319-35. 2003
  9. doi request reprint The David and Goliath principle: cultural, ideological, and attitudinal underpinnings of the normative protection of low-status groups from criticism
    Carla H Jeffries
    School of Psychology, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland, Australia
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 38:1053-65. 2012
  10. doi request reprint What happens when groups say sorry: the effect of intergroup apologies on their recipients
    Catherine R Philpot
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 34:474-87. 2008

Detail Information

Publications25

  1. ncbi request reprint Criticizing groups from the inside and the outside: an identity perspective on the intergroup sensitivity effect
    Matthew J Hornsey
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 30:365-83. 2004
    ..Finally, Experiment 3 indicated that although experience does not help outgroup critics, a lack of experience can hurt ingroup critics. Recommendations are provided as to how people can reduce defensiveness when making group criticisms...
  2. ncbi request reprint The effects of status on subgroup relations
    Matthew J Hornsey
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Australia
    Br J Soc Psychol 41:203-18. 2002
    ..The results were interpreted in terms of participants' needs for identity enhancement and identity distinctiveness...
  3. doi request reprint Group processes and outcomes in group psychotherapy: is it time to let go of "cohesiveness"?
    Matthew J Hornsey
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia 4072, Queensland, Australia
    Int J Group Psychother 59:267-78. 2009
    ..To the extent that the need for harmony is prioritized over the need for personal expression, dissent, and challenge, then it could be that cohesiveness might have negative as well as positive implications for members of group therapy...
  4. ncbi request reprint Group-directed criticisms and recommendations for change: why newcomers arouse more resistance than old-timers
    Matthew J Hornsey
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 33:1036-48. 2007
    ..Experiment 3 also showed that newcomers could reduce resistance to their criticisms by distancing themselves from a group of which they were previously members. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed...
  5. ncbi request reprint The individual within the group: balancing the need to belong with the need to be different
    Matthew J Hornsey
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia
    Pers Soc Psychol Rev 8:248-64. 2004
    ..These strategies are discussed and integrated with reference to recent empirical research and to the social identity perspective...
  6. ncbi request reprint Relations between high and low power groups: the importance of legitimacy
    Matthew J Hornsey
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Australia
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 29:216-27. 2003
    ..The results are discussed in terms of their implications for group relations...
  7. ncbi request reprint Linking superiority bias in the interpersonal and intergroup domains
    Matthew J Hornsey
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia
    J Soc Psychol 143:479-91. 2003
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint On being loud and proud: non-conformity and counter-conformity to group norms
    Matthew J Hornsey
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Australia
    Br J Soc Psychol 42:319-35. 2003
    ..Incidences of non-conformity and counter-conformity are discussed with reference to theory and research on normative influence...
  9. doi request reprint The David and Goliath principle: cultural, ideological, and attitudinal underpinnings of the normative protection of low-status groups from criticism
    Carla H Jeffries
    School of Psychology, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland, Australia
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 38:1053-65. 2012
    ..Specifically, those low in SDO were more likely to attribute traits of warmth and incompetence to David versus Goliath groups, a pattern of stereotypes that was related to the protection of David groups from criticism...
  10. doi request reprint What happens when groups say sorry: the effect of intergroup apologies on their recipients
    Catherine R Philpot
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 34:474-87. 2008
    ..In contrast, individuals who apologized for intergroup atrocities were personally forgiven more than those who did not apologize (Experiment 4). Theoretical and applied implications are discussed...
  11. doi request reprint Rejection as a call to arms: inter-racial hostility and support for political action as outcomes of race-based rejection in majority and minority groups
    Fiona Kate Barlow
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia
    Br J Soc Psychol 51:167-77. 2012
    ..This finding supports collective-action models of social change in historically disadvantaged minority groups...
  12. ncbi request reprint Does time reduce resistance to out-group critics? An investigation of the persistence of the intergroup sensitivity effect over time
    Danika N Hiew
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia
    Br J Soc Psychol 49:569-81. 2010
    ..However, the heightened intergroup bias found immediately after the out-group criticism did dissipate with time. Implications of these results for those who wish to initiate social change as outsiders are discussed...
  13. ncbi request reprint Social isolation schema responds to positive social experiences: Longitudinal evidence from vulnerable populations
    Tegan Cruwys
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia
    Br J Clin Psychol 53:265-80. 2014
    ..We propose that because maladaptive schemas are formed through social experiences (typically abusive or neglectful ones), they might best be corrected through positive social experiences that directly challenge the schema...
  14. doi request reprint Collective futures: how projections about the future of society are related to actions and attitudes supporting social change
    Paul G Bain
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 39:523-39. 2013
    ..Implications for social change theories, political communication, and policy design are discussed...
  15. doi request reprint Withholding negative feedback: is it about protecting the self or protecting others?
    Carla H Jeffries
    School of Psychology, The University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Australia
    Br J Soc Psychol 51:772-80. 2012
    ..The self-esteem of the essay writer had no effect on evaluations. The data lend support for a self-protection motive and modest support for an other-protection motive...
  16. ncbi request reprint Strategic defensiveness: public and private responses to group criticism
    Matthew J Hornsey
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Australia
    Br J Soc Psychol 46:697-716. 2007
    ..Theoretical and practical implications for intergroup and intragroup communication are discussed...
  17. ncbi request reprint Willingness to speak out about gay laws reform: some cause for optimism
    Matthew J Hornsey
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Austrailia
    J Homosex 47:47-61. 2004
    ..This suggests that anti-gay law reform attitudes are softer and more easily influenced than are pro-gay law reform attitudes. The implications of these results for activists are discussed...
  18. ncbi request reprint Feeling connected again: interventions that increase social identification reduce depression symptoms in community and clinical settings
    Tegan Cruwys
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia Electronic address
    J Affect Disord 159:139-46. 2014
    ..In particular, no research has investigated whether social identification (the sense of being part of a group) moderates the impact of social interventions...
  19. doi request reprint Shooting the messenger: outsiders critical of your group are rejected regardless of argument quality
    Sarah R Esposo
    The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia
    Br J Soc Psychol 52:386-95. 2013
    ....
  20. doi request reprint The effects of exclusion and reintegration on the evaluation of deviant opinion holders
    Marc K H Chan
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 35:1619-31. 2009
    ..Reintegration into the group can have ironic costs in a person's ability to communicate a deviant opinion successfully...
  21. pmc The wallpaper effect: the contact hypothesis fails for minority group members who live in areas with a high proportion of majority group members
    Fiona Kate Barlow
    School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    PLoS ONE 8:e82228. 2013
    ....
  22. doi request reprint Deviance and dissent in groups
    Jolanda Jetten
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia Email
    Annu Rev Psychol 65:461-85. 2014
    ..In doing so we aim for a balanced and complete account of deviance and dissent, highlighting when such behaviors will be encouraged as well as when they will be punished. ..
  23. pmc Loss of control increases belief in precognition and belief in precognition increases control
    Katharine H Greenaway
    The University of Queensland, School of Psychology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    PLoS ONE 8:e71327. 2013
    ..Prediction therefore acts as a compensatory mechanism in times of low control. The present research provides new insights into the psychological functions of seemingly irrational beliefs, like belief in psychic abilities...
  24. doi request reprint Feeling bad about being sad: the role of social expectancies in amplifying negative mood
    Brock Bastian
    School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD4072, Australia
    Emotion 12:69-80. 2012
    ..In short, when people perceive that others think they should feel happy, and not sad, this leads them to feel sad more frequently and intensely...
  25. ncbi request reprint When group members admit to being conformist: the role of relative intragroup status in conformity self-reports
    Jolanda Jetten
    School of Psychology, University of Exeter, UK
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 32:162-73. 2006
    ..The discussion focuses on the strategic processes underlying low-status group members' self-reports of group influence and the functional role of conformity in groups...