Bryan G Fry

Summary

Affiliation: University of Melbourne
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. ncbi Early evolution of the venom system in lizards and snakes
    Bryan G Fry
    Australian Venom Research Unit, Level 8, School of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
    Nature 439:584-8. 2006
  2. ncbi Denmotoxin, a three-finger toxin from the colubrid snake Boiga dendrophila (Mangrove Catsnake) with bird-specific activity
    Joanna Pawlak
    Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore
    J Biol Chem 281:29030-41. 2006
  3. ncbi Electrospray liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry fingerprinting of Acanthophis (death adder) venoms: taxonomic and toxinological implications
    Bryan G Fry
    Australian Venom Research Unit, Department of Pharmacology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 Australia
    Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom 16:600-8. 2002
  4. ncbi Evolution of an arsenal: structural and functional diversification of the venom system in the advanced snakes (Caenophidia)
    Bryan G Fry
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
    Mol Cell Proteomics 7:215-46. 2008
  5. doi Tentacles of venom: toxic protein convergence in the Kingdom Animalia
    B G Fry
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Venomics Research Laboratory, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic, 3010, Australia
    J Mol Evol 68:311-21. 2009
  6. pmc A central role for venom in predation by Varanus komodoensis (Komodo Dragon) and the extinct giant Varanus (Megalania) priscus
    Bryan G Fry
    Venomics Research Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:8969-74. 2009
  7. doi Evolution and diversification of the Toxicofera reptile venom system
    Bryan G Fry
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3010, Australia
    J Proteomics 72:127-36. 2009
  8. doi The toxicogenomic multiverse: convergent recruitment of proteins into animal venoms
    Bryan G Fry
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010 Australia
    Annu Rev Genomics Hum Genet 10:483-511. 2009
  9. doi Novel venom proteins produced by differential domain-expression strategies in beaded lizards and gila monsters (genus Heloderma)
    Bryan G Fry
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
    Mol Biol Evol 27:395-407. 2010
  10. pmc Functional and structural diversification of the Anguimorpha lizard venom system
    Bryan G Fry
    Venomics Research Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Mol Cell Proteomics 9:2369-90. 2010

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications35

  1. ncbi Early evolution of the venom system in lizards and snakes
    Bryan G Fry
    Australian Venom Research Unit, Level 8, School of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
    Nature 439:584-8. 2006
    ..These results provide new insights into the evolution of the venom system in squamate reptiles and open new avenues for biomedical research and drug design using hitherto unexplored venom proteins...
  2. ncbi Denmotoxin, a three-finger toxin from the colubrid snake Boiga dendrophila (Mangrove Catsnake) with bird-specific activity
    Joanna Pawlak
    Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore
    J Biol Chem 281:29030-41. 2006
    ..Denmotoxin illustrates the relationship between toxin specificity and the primary prey type that constitutes the snake's diet...
  3. ncbi Electrospray liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry fingerprinting of Acanthophis (death adder) venoms: taxonomic and toxinological implications
    Bryan G Fry
    Australian Venom Research Unit, Department of Pharmacology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 Australia
    Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom 16:600-8. 2002
    ..Mass profiling of Acanthophis venoms clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of this technique which underpins fundamental studies ranging from chemotaxonomy to drug design...
  4. ncbi Evolution of an arsenal: structural and functional diversification of the venom system in the advanced snakes (Caenophidia)
    Bryan G Fry
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
    Mol Cell Proteomics 7:215-46. 2008
    ....
  5. doi Tentacles of venom: toxic protein convergence in the Kingdom Animalia
    B G Fry
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Venomics Research Laboratory, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic, 3010, Australia
    J Mol Evol 68:311-21. 2009
    ....
  6. pmc A central role for venom in predation by Varanus komodoensis (Komodo Dragon) and the extinct giant Varanus (Megalania) priscus
    Bryan G Fry
    Venomics Research Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:8969-74. 2009
    ..Anatomical comparisons of V. komodoensis with V. (Megalania) priscus fossils suggest that the closely related extinct giant was the largest venomous animal to have ever lived...
  7. doi Evolution and diversification of the Toxicofera reptile venom system
    Bryan G Fry
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3010, Australia
    J Proteomics 72:127-36. 2009
    ....
  8. doi The toxicogenomic multiverse: convergent recruitment of proteins into animal venoms
    Bryan G Fry
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010 Australia
    Annu Rev Genomics Hum Genet 10:483-511. 2009
    ..Given the large number of striking similarities between the protein compositions of conventional venoms and hematophagous secretions, we argue that the latter should also fall under the same definition...
  9. doi Novel venom proteins produced by differential domain-expression strategies in beaded lizards and gila monsters (genus Heloderma)
    Bryan G Fry
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
    Mol Biol Evol 27:395-407. 2010
    ..These results highlight the importance of utilizing evolutionary-based search strategies for biodiscovery and the virtually unexplored potential of lizard venoms in drug design and discovery...
  10. pmc Functional and structural diversification of the Anguimorpha lizard venom system
    Bryan G Fry
    Venomics Research Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Mol Cell Proteomics 9:2369-90. 2010
    ..The results obtained highlight the importance of utilizing evolution-based search strategies for biodiscovery and emphasize the largely untapped drug design and development potential of lizard venoms...
  11. pmc From genome to "venome": molecular origin and evolution of the snake venom proteome inferred from phylogenetic analysis of toxin sequences and related body proteins
    Bryan G Fry
    Australian Venom Research Unit, Level 8, School of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 Australia
    Genome Res 15:403-20. 2005
    ..However, this study revealed that the toxin types, where the ancestral protein was extensively cysteine cross-linked, were the ones that flourished into functionally diverse, novel toxin multigene families...
  12. ncbi Isolation of a neurotoxin (alpha-colubritoxin) from a nonvenomous colubrid: evidence for early origin of venom in snakes
    Bryan G Fry
    Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, 119260 Singapore
    J Mol Evol 57:446-52. 2003
    ..These results support the role of venom as a key evolutionary innovation in the early diversification of advanced snakes and provide evidence that forces a fundamental rethink of the very concept of nonvenomous snake...
  13. ncbi Analysis of Colubroidea snake venoms by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry: evolutionary and toxinological implications
    Bryan G Fry
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
    Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom 17:2047-62. 2003
    ..The data will also be useful in biodiscovery...
  14. ncbi Molecular evolution and phylogeny of elapid snake venom three-finger toxins
    B G Fry
    Australian Venom Research Unit, Department of Pharmacology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
    J Mol Evol 57:110-29. 2003
    ..It is anticipated that this "three-finger toxin toolkit" will prove to be useful in providing a clearer picture of the diversity of investigational ligands or potential therapeutics available within this important family...
  15. ncbi The in vitro neurotoxic and myotoxic effects of the venom from the Suta genus (curl snakes) of elapid snakes
    Sanjaya Kuruppu
    Monash Venom Group, Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
    Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol 101:407-10. 2007
    ..This effect was not reversed by antivenom (5 units/ml). This study highlights the danger of underestimating the potential severe clinical effects posed by these small but highly venomous snakes...
  16. ncbi Isolation and characterization at cholinergic nicotinic receptors of a neurotoxin from the venom of the Acanthophis sp. Seram death adder
    Janith C Wickramaratna
    Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia
    Biochem Pharmacol 68:383-94. 2004
    ..While long-chain neurotoxin resistant [3H]-MLA binding in hippocampus homogenate requires further investigation, we have shown that a short-chain (Type I) neurotoxin is capable of fully inhibiting specific [3H]-MLA binding...
  17. ncbi In vitro neuromuscular activity of 'colubrid' venoms: clinical and evolutionary implications
    Natalie G Lumsden
    Monash Venom Group, Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800, Australia
    Toxicon 43:819-27. 2004
    ..dhara and P. mossambicus venoms. The results demonstrate a hitherto unsuspected diversity of pharmacological actions in all lineages which may have implications ranging from clinical management of envenomings to venom evolution...
  18. pmc Expression pattern of three-finger toxin and phospholipase A2 genes in the venom glands of two sea snakes, Lapemis curtus and Acalyptophis peronii: comparison of evolution of these toxins in land snakes, sea kraits and sea snakes
    Susanta Pahari
    Protein Science and Conservation Ecology Laboratories, Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, 117543, Singapore
    BMC Evol Biol 7:175. 2007
    ..It is therefore interesting to examine the evolution of toxins in sea snake venoms compared to that of land snakes...
  19. ncbi Pharmacological characterisation of a neurotoxin from the venom of Boiga dendrophila (mangrove catsnake)
    Natalie G Lumsden
    Monash Venom Group, Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, Clayton VIC 3800, Australia
    Toxicon 45:329-34. 2005
    ..This is the first report of such activity for a toxin isolated from snake venom and reinforces the largely untapped potential of colubrid venoms...
  20. ncbi The in vitro neuromuscular activity of Indo-Pacific sea-snake venoms: efficacy of two commercially available antivenoms
    Navinisha Chetty
    Monash Venom Group, Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, Wellington Rd, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
    Toxicon 44:193-200. 2004
    ..However, the effects of CSL tiger snake antivenom are more variable...
  21. ncbi Species-dependent variations in the in vitro myotoxicity of death adder (Acanthophis) venoms
    Janith C Wickramaratna
    Monash Venom Group, Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia
    Toxicol Sci 74:352-60. 2003
    ..praelongus, A. rugosus, and A. wellsi venoms (50 microg/ml; n=4-7). In conclusion, clinicians may need to be mindful of possible myotoxicity following envenomations by A. praelongus, A. rugosus, A. sp. Seram, and A. wellsi species...
  22. doi Toxinology of venoms from five Australian lesser known elapid snakes
    Kyle Pycroft
    Monash Venom Group, Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, Clayton, Vic, Australia
    Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol 111:268-74. 2012
    ..This study demonstrated that these understudied Australian elapids have varying pharmacological activity, with notable in vitro neurotoxicity for four of the venoms, and may produce mild to moderate effects following systemic envenoming...
  23. pmc Antimicrobial activity of omwaprin, a new member of the waprin family of snake venom proteins
    Dileep G Nair
    Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543
    Biochem J 402:93-104. 2007
    ....
  24. ncbi In vitro neurotoxic and myotoxic effects of the venom from the black whip snake (Demansia papuensis)
    S Kuruppu
    Monash Venom Group, Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, Victoria, Australia
    Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol 33:364-8. 2006
    ..This activity was confirmed by histological examination of the muscle. 4. Fractionation and characterization of venom components is required to further investigate the reasons for the weak neurotoxic activity of D. papuensis venom...
  25. doi Variations in the pharmacological profile of post-synaptic neurotoxins isolated from the venoms of the Papuan (Oxyuranus scutellatus canni) and coastal (Oxyuranus scutellatus scutellatus) taipans
    Rachelle Kornhauser
    Monash Venom Group, Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia
    Neurotoxicology 31:239-43. 2010
    ..The effect of alpha-oxytoxin 1 is atypical of most snake venom post-synaptic neurotoxins displaying a 'competitive' mode of action, whereas alpha-scutoxin 1 possesses pseudo-irreversible or non-competitive activity...
  26. ncbi Comparison of the in vitro neuromuscular activity of venom from three Australian snakes (Hoplocephalus stephensi, Austrelaps superbus and Notechis scutatus): efficacy of tiger snake antivenom
    Wayne C Hodgson
    Monash Venom Group, Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, Clayton, Australian Venom Research Unit, Department of Pharmacology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
    Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol 30:127-32. 2003
    ..All venoms (10-100 microg/mL) also displayed signs of in vitro myotoxicity. 4. The results of the present study indicate that all three venoms contain neurotoxic activity that is effectively attenuated by tiger snake antivenom...
  27. ncbi Neurotoxic effects of venoms from seven species of Australasian black snakes (Pseudechis): efficacy of black and tiger snake antivenoms
    Sharmaine Ramasamy
    Monash Venom Group, Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, Clayton, Australia
    Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol 32:7-12. 2005
    ..porphyriacus (20+/-7%) venoms. 5. We show, for the first time, the presence of neurotoxins in the venom of these related snake species and that this activity is differentially affected by either black snake or tiger snake antivenoms...
  28. pmc Isolation and pharmacological characterization of a phospholipase A2 myotoxin from the venom of the Irian Jayan death adder (Acanthophis rugosus)
    Janith C Wickramaratna
    Monash Venom Group, Department of Pharmacology, P O Box 13E, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia
    Br J Pharmacol 138:333-42. 2003
    ..1 Hz, 0.2 ms, supramaximal V) stimulated CBCNM preparation. 6. In conclusion, clinicians may need to be mindful of possible myotoxicity following death adder envenomation in Irian Jaya...
  29. ncbi Putting the brakes on snake venom evolution: the unique molecular evolutionary patterns of Aipysurus eydouxii (Marbled sea snake) phospholipase A2 toxins
    Min Li
    Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, Singapore
    Mol Biol Evol 22:934-41. 2005
    ..This is the first case of decelerated evolution of toxins in snake venom...
  30. ncbi Ohanin, a novel protein from king cobra venom: its cDNA and genomic organization
    Yuh Fen Pung
    Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, 117543 Singapore
    Gene 371:246-56. 2006
    ..Our results indicate that ohanin and vespryns may have evolved from the same ancestral gene as B30.2 domain...
  31. ncbi Eggs-only diet: its implications for the toxin profile changes and ecology of the marbled sea snake (Aipysurus eydouxii)
    Min Li
    Department of Biological Science, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119260
    J Mol Evol 60:81-9. 2005
    ..It is interesting to note that a potent venom was not maintained for use in defense, thus reinforcing that the primary use of snake venom is for prey capture...
  32. ncbi Assembling an arsenal: origin and evolution of the snake venom proteome inferred from phylogenetic analysis of toxin sequences
    B G Fry
    Australian Venom Research Unit, Department of Pharmacology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia
    Mol Biol Evol 21:870-83. 2004
    ..Moreover, they provide a first insight into the composition of the earliest ophidian venoms and point the way toward a research program that could elucidate the functional context of the evolution of the snake venom proteome...
  33. ncbi Presynaptic neuromuscular activity of venom from the brown-headed snake (Glyphodon tristis)
    S Kuruppu
    Monash Venom Group, Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia
    Toxicon 45:383-8. 2005
    ..The phospholipase A inhibitor 4-BPB (1.8 mM) significantly attenuated the inhibition of indirect and direct twitches of the CBCNM preparation, indicating the involvement of a PLA2 component in the toxic action of the venom...
  34. ncbi Novel natriuretic peptides from the venom of the inland taipan (Oxyuranus microlepidotus): isolation, chemical and biological characterisation
    Bryan G Fry
    Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia
    Biochem Biophys Res Commun 327:1011-5. 2005
    ..Thus, these naturally occurring isoforms provide a new platform for further investigation of structure-function relationships of natriuretic peptides...
  35. doi Evolutionary origin and development of snake fangs
    Freek J Vonk
    Institute of Biology, Leiden University, Kaiserstraat 63, PO Box 9516, 2300 RA, Leiden, The Netherlands
    Nature 454:630-3. 2008
    ..This developmental event could have facilitated the massive radiation of advanced snakes in the Cenozoic era, resulting in the spectacular diversity of snakes seen today...