Katherine Belov

Summary

Affiliation: University of Sydney
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. pmc Reconstructing an ancestral mammalian immune supercomplex from a marsupial major histocompatibility complex
    Katherine Belov
    Centre for Advanced Technologies in Animal Genetics and Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, Camden, Australia
    PLoS Biol 4:e46. 2006
  2. pmc Characterization of the opossum immune genome provides insights into the evolution of the mammalian immune system
    Katherine Belov
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Genome Res 17:982-91. 2007
  3. doi request reprint High levels of genetic variation at MHC class II DBB loci in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)
    Yuanyuan Cheng
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, RMC Gunn B19, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    Immunogenetics 61:111-8. 2009
  4. doi request reprint Identification of natural killer cell receptor clusters in the platypus genome reveals an expansion of C-type lectin genes
    Emily S W Wong
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, B19 RMC Gunn, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia
    Immunogenetics 61:565-79. 2009
  5. pmc The tammar wallaby major histocompatibility complex shows evidence of past genomic instability
    Hannah V Siddle
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    BMC Genomics 12:421. 2011
  6. pmc MHC gene copy number variation in Tasmanian devils: implications for the spread of a contagious cancer
    Hannah V Siddle
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 277:2001-6. 2010
  7. pmc Novel venom gene discovery in the platypus
    Camilla M Whittington
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, Regimental Crescent, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia
    Genome Biol 11:R95. 2010
  8. doi request reprint Understanding and utilising mammalian venom via a platypus venom transcriptome
    Camilla M Whittington
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    J Proteomics 72:155-64. 2009
  9. pmc Low major histocompatibility complex diversity in the Tasmanian devil predates European settlement and may explain susceptibility to disease epidemics
    Katrina Morris
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Biol Lett 9:20120900. 2013
  10. pmc Proteomics and deep sequencing comparison of seasonally active venom glands in the platypus reveals novel venom peptides and distinct expression profiles
    Emily S W Wong
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia
    Mol Cell Proteomics 11:1354-64. 2012

Detail Information

Publications39

  1. pmc Reconstructing an ancestral mammalian immune supercomplex from a marsupial major histocompatibility complex
    Katherine Belov
    Centre for Advanced Technologies in Animal Genetics and Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, Camden, Australia
    PLoS Biol 4:e46. 2006
    ..The opossum genome, together with other extant genomes, reveals the existence of an ancestral "immune supercomplex" that contained genes of both types of natural killer receptors together with antigen processing genes and MHC genes...
  2. pmc Characterization of the opossum immune genome provides insights into the evolution of the mammalian immune system
    Katherine Belov
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Genome Res 17:982-91. 2007
    ..Given the similarities in the genomic architecture of the marsupial and eutherian immune systems, we propose that marsupials are ideal model organisms for the study of developmental immunology...
  3. doi request reprint High levels of genetic variation at MHC class II DBB loci in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)
    Yuanyuan Cheng
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, RMC Gunn B19, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    Immunogenetics 61:111-8. 2009
    ....
  4. doi request reprint Identification of natural killer cell receptor clusters in the platypus genome reveals an expansion of C-type lectin genes
    Emily S W Wong
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, B19 RMC Gunn, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia
    Immunogenetics 61:565-79. 2009
    ..We have used this new data from platypus to trace the possible evolutionary history of the NK receptor clusters...
  5. pmc The tammar wallaby major histocompatibility complex shows evidence of past genomic instability
    Hannah V Siddle
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    BMC Genomics 12:421. 2011
    ..The tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), an Australian marsupial, provides a unique model for understanding MHC gene evolution, as many of its antigen presenting genes are not linked to the MHC, but are scattered around the genome...
  6. pmc MHC gene copy number variation in Tasmanian devils: implications for the spread of a contagious cancer
    Hannah V Siddle
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 277:2001-6. 2010
    ..The implication of these results for management of DFTD and this endangered species are discussed...
  7. pmc Novel venom gene discovery in the platypus
    Camilla M Whittington
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, Regimental Crescent, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia
    Genome Biol 11:R95. 2010
    ..We have constructed and sequenced a cDNA library from an active platypus venom gland to identify the remaining components...
  8. doi request reprint Understanding and utilising mammalian venom via a platypus venom transcriptome
    Camilla M Whittington
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    J Proteomics 72:155-64. 2009
    ..It is therefore hoped that this basic research to identify the constituents of platypus venom will eventually yield novel drugs and new targets for painkillers...
  9. pmc Low major histocompatibility complex diversity in the Tasmanian devil predates European settlement and may explain susceptibility to disease epidemics
    Katrina Morris
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Biol Lett 9:20120900. 2013
    ..We conclude that low MHC diversity has been a feature of devil populations since at least the Mid-Holocene and could explain their tumultuous history of population crashes...
  10. pmc Proteomics and deep sequencing comparison of seasonally active venom glands in the platypus reveals novel venom peptides and distinct expression profiles
    Emily S W Wong
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia
    Mol Cell Proteomics 11:1354-64. 2012
    ..These novel venom proteins have potential biomedical and therapeutic applications and provide insights into venom evolution...
  11. pmc A limited role for gene duplications in the evolution of platypus venom
    Emily S W Wong
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Mol Biol Evol 29:167-77. 2012
    ..However, gene duplications alone do not explain the "venome" of the platypus. Other mechanisms, such as alternative splicing and mutation, may be important in venom innovation...
  12. doi request reprint Identification of natural killer cell receptor genes in the genome of the marsupial Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii)
    Lauren E van der Kraan
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, B19 RMC Gunn, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Immunogenetics 65:25-35. 2013
    ..Understanding the functional role of these genes is also important for the development of therapeutic agents against Devil Facial Tumour Disease, a contagious cancer that threatens the Tasmanian devil with extinction...
  13. doi request reprint Expression patterns of platypus defensin and related venom genes across a range of tissue types reveal the possibility of broader functions for OvDLPs than previously suspected
    Camilla M Whittington
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, RMC Gunn B19, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Toxicon 52:559-65. 2008
    ....
  14. pmc MHC-linked and un-linked class I genes in the wallaby
    Hannah V Siddle
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    BMC Genomics 10:310. 2009
    ..We investigated this hypothesis by characterizing the class I genes of the tammar wallaby, a model marsupial that has a novel MHC organization, with class I genes located within the MHC and 10 other chromosomal locations...
  15. pmc New insights into the role of MHC diversity in devil facial tumour disease
    Amanda Lane
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    PLoS ONE 7:e36955. 2012
    ..Here we test the hypothesis that animals that remain healthy and tumour free show predictable differences at MHC loci compared to animals that develop the disease...
  16. pmc Antigen-presenting genes and genomic copy number variations in the Tasmanian devil MHC
    Yuanyuan Cheng
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    BMC Genomics 13:87. 2012
    ..DFTD is caused by a clonal tumour cell line that is transmitted between unrelated individuals as an allograft without triggering immune rejection due to low levels of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) diversity in Tasmanian devils...
  17. doi request reprint Low MHC class II diversity in the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii)
    Yuanyuan Cheng
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, RMC Gunn B19, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Immunogenetics 64:525-33. 2012
    ..These findings further support the view that this species has a compromised capacity to respond to pathogen evolution, emerging infectious diseases and environmental changes...
  18. doi request reprint Contagious cancer: lessons from the devil and the dog
    Katherine Belov
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    Bioessays 34:285-92. 2012
    ..A greater understanding of these contagious cancers will provide unique insights into the role of the immune system in shaping tumour evolution and may uncover novel approaches for treating human cancer...
  19. ncbi request reprint Characterization of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes from the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii)
    Hannah V Siddle
    Centre for Advanced Technologies in Animal Genetics and Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, RMC Gunn B19, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia
    Immunogenetics 59:753-60. 2007
    ..The MHC genes described here are most likely involved in antigen presentation and are an important first step for studying MHC diversity and immune response in the devil...
  20. doi request reprint Diversity at the major histocompatibility complex Class II in the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus
    Mette Lillie
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    J Hered 103:467-78. 2012
    ..Loss of MHC diversity on King Island is of concern, as the population may have compromised immunological fitness and reduced ability to resist changing environmental conditions...
  21. doi request reprint Characterisation of four major histocompatibility complex class II genes of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)
    Quintin Lau
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Immunogenetics 65:37-46. 2013
    ..We detected greater variation in the β1 than in the α1 domains as well as evidence of positive selection in DAB. The present study provides a springboard to future investigation of the role of MHC in disease susceptibility in koalas...
  22. doi request reprint The role of the Major Histocompatibility Complex in the spread of contagious cancers
    Katherine Belov
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, RMC Gunn B19, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Mamm Genome 22:83-90. 2011
    ..Transmissible cancers are rare but they can provide unique insights into the genetics and immunology of tumours and organ transplants...
  23. pmc Transmission of a fatal clonal tumor by biting occurs due to depleted MHC diversity in a threatened carnivorous marsupial
    Hannah V Siddle
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:16221-6. 2007
    ..The neoplastic clone continues to spread although the population, and, without active disease control by removal of affected animals and the isolation of disease-free animals, the Tasmanian devil faces extinction...
  24. doi request reprint Evolution of viviparity and uterine angiogenesis: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in oviparous and viviparous skinks
    Bridget F Murphy
    Integrative Physiology Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    J Exp Zool B Mol Dev Evol 314:148-56. 2010
    ..The presence of VEGF(111) in S. equalis may be an opportunity to investigate the function of this unique transcript in a whole animal system...
  25. ncbi request reprint Isolation of major histocompatibility complex Class I genes from the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)
    Hannah V Siddle
    Centre for Advanced Technologies in Animal Genetics and Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    Immunogenetics 58:487-93. 2006
    ..Phylogenetic analysis of tammar wallaby Class I sequences and other mammalian Class I sequences suggests that some tammar wallaby and red-necked wallaby loci evolved from common ancestral genes...
  26. pmc Defensins and the convergent evolution of platypus and reptile venom genes
    Camilla M Whittington
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
    Genome Res 18:986-94. 2008
    ..Convergent evolution has repeatedly selected genes coding for proteins containing specific structural motifs as templates for venom molecules...
  27. doi request reprint Does the devil facial tumour produce immunosuppressive cytokines as an immune evasion strategy?
    Katrina Morris
    Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, RMC Gunn, B19, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
    Vet Immunol Immunopathol 153:159-64. 2013
    ..We therefore conclude that these cytokines do not play a role in the spread of DFTD. Further work will be needed to elucidate how DFTD cells avoid immune rejection...
  28. ncbi request reprint Evolution of the major histocompatibility complex: Isolation of class II beta cDNAs from two monotremes, the platypus and the short-beaked echidna
    Katherine Belov
    Evolutionary Biology Unit, Australian Museum, 6 College St, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia
    Immunogenetics 55:402-11. 2003
    ..However, within the mammalian clade, monophyletic clades are not robust, and elucidation of the order of gene duplication that gave rise to the present-day gene clusters is not yet possible...
  29. ncbi request reprint Unusually similar patterns of antibody V segment diversity in distantly related marsupials
    Michelle L Baker
    Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    J Immunol 174:5665-71. 2005
    ..All marsupial V(H) sequences isolated so far form a common clade of closely related sequences, and in contrast to the V(L) genes, the V(H) likely underwent a major loss of diversity early in marsupial evolution...
  30. ncbi request reprint Characterization of MHC class II genes from an ancient reptile lineage, Sphenodon (tuatara)
    Hilary C Miller
    Allan Wilson Centre for Molecular Ecology and Evolution, School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
    Immunogenetics 57:883-91. 2005
    ..The tuatara sequences do not strongly group with other reptile sequences on a phylogenetic tree, reflecting the antiquity of the Sphenodon lineage and the lack of closely related sequences for comparison...
  31. ncbi request reprint Proceedings of the SMBE Tri-National Young Investigators' Workshop 2005. MHC Class I genes in the Tuatara (Sphenodon spp.): evolution of the MHC in an ancient reptilian order
    Hilary C Miller
    Allan Wilson Centre for Molecular Ecology and Evolution, School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
    Mol Biol Evol 23:949-56. 2006
    ..However, the evolutionary relationships among sequences from different reptilian orders cannot be resolved, reflecting the antiquity of the major reptile lineages...
  32. pmc Evolution and comparative analysis of the MHC Class III inflammatory region
    Janine E Deakin
    ARC Centre for Kangaroo Genomics, Research School of Biological Sciences, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    BMC Genomics 7:281. 2006
    ..We also discuss the extent of sequence conservation across the entire region and identify elements conserved in evolution...
  33. pmc Genome analysis of the platypus reveals unique signatures of evolution
    Wesley C Warren
    Genome Sequencing Center, Washington University School of Medicine, Campus Box 8501, 4444 Forest Park Avenue, St Louis, Missouri 63108, USA
    Nature 453:175-83. 2008
    ..Sequencing of this genome now provides a valuable resource for deep mammalian comparative analyses, as well as for monotreme biology and conservation...
  34. ncbi request reprint Genome of the marsupial Monodelphis domestica reveals innovation in non-coding sequences
    Tarjei S Mikkelsen
    Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA
    Nature 447:167-77. 2007
    ..A substantial proportion of these eutherian-specific CNEs arose from sequence inserted by transposable elements, pointing to transposons as a major creative force in the evolution of mammalian gene regulation...
  35. ncbi request reprint Isolation of monotreme T-cell receptor alpha and beta chains
    Katherine Belov
    Evolutionary Biology Unit, Australian Museum, 6 College St, 2010, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Immunogenetics 56:164-9. 2004
    ..Southern blot analysis indicates that, like in other mammalian species, there is only one TCRA constant region copy in the echidna genome, but at least two TCRB constant regions...
  36. ncbi request reprint Immunoglobulin genetics of Ornithorhynchus anatinus (platypus) and Tachyglossus aculeatus (short-beaked echidna)
    Katherine Belov
    Evolutionary Biology Unit, Australian Museum, 6 College Street, Sydney 2010, Australia
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 136:811-9. 2003
    ..The constant region of IgM has proven to be a useful marker for estimating the time of divergence of mammalian lineages...
  37. ncbi request reprint Echidna IgA supports mammalian unity and traditional Therian relationship
    Katherine Belov
    Evolutionary Biology Unit, Australian Museum, 6 College St, Sydney, Australia 2010
    Mamm Genome 13:656-63. 2002
    ....
  38. ncbi request reprint Characterisation of echidna IgM provides insights into the time of divergence of extant mammals
    Katherine Belov
    Evolutionary Biology Unit, Australian Museum, 6 College Street, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia
    Dev Comp Immunol 26:831-9. 2002
    ..Cmu sequences suggest that monotremes and therians separated approximately 170 million years ago (mya), marsupials and eutherians separated approximately 130mya, and Australian and American marsupials separated approximately 65mya...
  39. ncbi request reprint Characterization of immunoglobulin gamma 1 from a monotreme, Tachyglossus aculeatus
    Katherine Belov
    Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    Immunogenetics 53:1065-71. 2002
    ..Phylogenetic analyses using the immunoglobulin sequence data strongly support the 'Theria' hypothesis, with the monotreme lineage diverging prior to the separation of the marsupial and eutherian lineages...