R J Croft

Summary

Affiliation: Swinburne University of Technology
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint The effect of mobile phone electromagnetic fields on the alpha rhythm of human electroencephalogram
    R J Croft
    Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Bioelectromagnetics 29:1-10. 2008
  2. ncbi request reprint Can the Q Link Ally, a form of Sympathetic Resonance Technology (SRT), attenuate acute mobile phone-related changes to neural function?
    Rodney J Croft
    Brain and Behaviour Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia
    J Altern Complement Med 8:427-35. 2002
  3. ncbi request reprint Acute mobile phone operation affects neural function in humans
    Rodney J Croft
    Brain and Behaviour Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Northfields Ave, Australia
    Clin Neurophysiol 113:1623-32. 2002
  4. ncbi request reprint Mobile phones and brain tumours: a review of epidemiological research
    R J Croft
    Australian Centre for Radiofrequency Bioeffects Research, Melbourne, Australia
    Australas Phys Eng Sci Med 31:255-67. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint Target-to-target interval versus probability effects on P300 in one- and two-tone tasks
    R J Croft
    Neuropsychopharmacology, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Psychophysiology 40:322-8. 2003
  6. ncbi request reprint The sensitivity of human event-related potentials and reaction time to mobile phone emitted electromagnetic fields
    D L Hamblin
    Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Bioelectromagnetics 27:265-73. 2006
  7. doi request reprint Effects of 2G and 3G mobile phones on performance and electrophysiology in adolescents, young adults and older adults
    S Leung
    Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Clin Neurophysiol 122:2203-16. 2011
  8. doi request reprint Effects of 2G and 3G mobile phones on human alpha rhythms: Resting EEG in adolescents, young adults, and the elderly
    R J Croft
    Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Bioelectromagnetics 31:434-44. 2010
  9. ncbi request reprint Comparison of the effects of continuous and pulsed mobile phone like RF exposure on the human EEG
    N Perentos
    School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia
    Australas Phys Eng Sci Med 30:274-80. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint The use of a 'phantom scalp' to assess the possible direct pickup of mobile phone handset emissions by electroencephalogram electrode leads
    A W Wood
    School of Biophysical Sciences and Electrical Engineering, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Med Biol Eng Comput 41:470-2. 2003

Detail Information

Publications58

  1. ncbi request reprint The effect of mobile phone electromagnetic fields on the alpha rhythm of human electroencephalogram
    R J Croft
    Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Bioelectromagnetics 29:1-10. 2008
    ..Employing a strong methodology, the current findings support previous research that has reported an effect of MP exposure on EEG alpha power...
  2. ncbi request reprint Can the Q Link Ally, a form of Sympathetic Resonance Technology (SRT), attenuate acute mobile phone-related changes to neural function?
    Rodney J Croft
    Brain and Behaviour Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia
    J Altern Complement Med 8:427-35. 2002
    ..The present pilot study was designed to determine whether there is any indication that QL does alter MP-related effects on the human EEG...
  3. ncbi request reprint Acute mobile phone operation affects neural function in humans
    Rodney J Croft
    Brain and Behaviour Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Northfields Ave, Australia
    Clin Neurophysiol 113:1623-32. 2002
    ..The present study suggests that this conflict may be due to methodological differences such as exposure durations, and tests whether exposure to an active MP affects EEG as a function of time...
  4. ncbi request reprint Mobile phones and brain tumours: a review of epidemiological research
    R J Croft
    Australian Centre for Radiofrequency Bioeffects Research, Melbourne, Australia
    Australas Phys Eng Sci Med 31:255-67. 2008
    ..The reported associations are in need of replication with methods designed to minimise such bias before they can be treated as more than suggestive...
  5. ncbi request reprint Target-to-target interval versus probability effects on P300 in one- and two-tone tasks
    R J Croft
    Neuropsychopharmacology, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Psychophysiology 40:322-8. 2003
    ..This suggests that ISI and probability per se do not independently affect P3 amplitude, and that TTI offers a strong explanation of the reported relations between P3 amplitude and both ISI and probability...
  6. ncbi request reprint The sensitivity of human event-related potentials and reaction time to mobile phone emitted electromagnetic fields
    D L Hamblin
    Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Bioelectromagnetics 27:265-73. 2006
    ..As previous positive findings were not replicated, it was concluded that there is currently no evidence that acute MP exposure affects these indices of brain activity...
  7. doi request reprint Effects of 2G and 3G mobile phones on performance and electrophysiology in adolescents, young adults and older adults
    S Leung
    Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Clin Neurophysiol 122:2203-16. 2011
    ..This study examined sensory and cognitive processing in adolescents, young adults and older adults, when exposed to 2nd (2G) and 3rd (3G) generation mobile phone signals...
  8. doi request reprint Effects of 2G and 3G mobile phones on human alpha rhythms: Resting EEG in adolescents, young adults, and the elderly
    R J Croft
    Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Bioelectromagnetics 31:434-44. 2010
    ..The results provide further support for an effect of 2G exposures on resting alpha activity in young adults, but fail to support a similar enhancement in adolescents or the elderly, or in any age group as a function of 3G exposure...
  9. ncbi request reprint Comparison of the effects of continuous and pulsed mobile phone like RF exposure on the human EEG
    N Perentos
    School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia
    Australas Phys Eng Sci Med 30:274-80. 2007
    ..Again, no effect was demonstrated for either modulated or unmodulated radiofrequency exposures...
  10. ncbi request reprint The use of a 'phantom scalp' to assess the possible direct pickup of mobile phone handset emissions by electroencephalogram electrode leads
    A W Wood
    School of Biophysical Sciences and Electrical Engineering, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Med Biol Eng Comput 41:470-2. 2003
    ..5-30 Hz. An anomalous difference was noted for one electrode in the range 30-45 Hz...
  11. doi request reprint Augmenting serotonin neurotransmission with citalopram modulates emotional expression decoding but not structural encoding of moderate intensity sad facial emotional stimuli: an event-related potential (ERP) investigation
    I Labuschagne
    School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
    J Psychopharmacol 24:1153-64. 2010
    ..The enhanced cortical response to perception of moderately intense sad facial expressions following citalopram administration may relate to the cognitive processing of the social relevance or significance of such ambiguous stimuli...
  12. ncbi request reprint Individualized alpha activity and frontal asymmetry in major depression
    R A Segrave
    Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, The Alfred and Monash University School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Clin EEG Neurosci 42:45-52. 2011
    ..The relevance of this finding is discussed in relation to the electrophysiological correlates of antidepressant medication use, lateralized differences in affective processing and treatment resistant MDD...
  13. doi request reprint The alpha band of the resting electroencephalogram under pulsed and continuous radio frequency exposures
    N Perentos
    Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001, Australia
    IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 60:1702-10. 2013
    ..The results support the view that alpha is altered by RF electromagnetic fields, but suggest that the pulsing nature of the fields is not essential for this effect to occur...
  14. ncbi request reprint The effects of dexamphetamine on simulated driving performance
    B Y Silber
    Drugs and Driving Research Unit, Centre for Neuropsychology, Swinburne University of Technology, P O Box 218, Hawthorn, Vic, 3122, Australia
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 179:536-43. 2005
    ..However, there remains uncertainty as to the extent that these drugs induce driving impairment, and whether any such impairments translate to an increase in road fatalities...
  15. ncbi request reprint Dosimetric evaluation and comparison of different RF exposure apparatuses used in human volunteer studies
    S P Loughran
    Australian Centre for Radiofrequency Bioeffects Research ACRBR, Melbourne, Australia
    Bioelectromagnetics 29:242-3. 2008
  16. ncbi request reprint Effects of rTMS on an auditory oddball task: a pilot study of cortical plasticity and the EEG
    N R Cooper
    Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, Department of Psychological Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
    Clin EEG Neurosci 39:139-43. 2008
    ..No changes were found to oddball-P300 amplitudes or latencies. In conclusion, the findings of less alpha desynchronization post-TMS are compatible with notions of slow rTMS causing a decrease in cortical excitation...
  17. ncbi request reprint Executive functions in obsessive-compulsive disorder: state or trait deficits?
    Shelley Bannon
    Brain and Behaviour Research Institute, School of Psychology, University of Wollongong, New South Wales, and Department of Psychological Medicine, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia
    Aust N Z J Psychiatry 40:1031-8. 2006
    ..The current research examines the executive functions in OCD in a comprehensive manner and, for the first time, assesses the stability of these deficits over the developmental course of the disorder...
  18. ncbi request reprint Pindolol does not augment central serotonin function increases to citalopram in humans: an auditory evoked potential investigation
    Rebecca Segrave
    Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Pharmacol Biochem Behav 85:82-90. 2006
    ..The findings may provide further support for why pindolol may not be an effective therapeutic strategy to augment serotonin function and antidepressant response...
  19. ncbi request reprint Acute serotonin and dopamine depletion improves attentional control: findings from the stroop task
    Kirsty E Scholes
    Behavioural Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Physiology, Monash Centre for Brain and Behavior, Monash University, Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Neuropsychopharmacology 32:1600-10. 2007
    ..These findings enhance our understanding of the neurochemical basis of attentional control and the possible cause of attentional control deficits in schizophrenia...
  20. ncbi request reprint Dopamine receptor stimulation does not modulate the loudness dependence of the auditory evoked potential in humans
    Barry V O'Neill
    Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 188:92-9. 2006
    ....
  21. ncbi request reprint EEG electrode caps can reduce SAR induced in the head by GSM900 mobile phones
    Denise L Hamblin
    Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, 400 Burwood Rd, Hawthorn, Vic 3122, Australia
    IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 54:914-20. 2007
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Acute dopamine D(1) and D(2) receptor stimulation does not modulate mismatch negativity (MMN) in healthy human subjects
    Sumie Leung
    Biological Psychiatry Research Unit, Brain Sciences Institute, Faculty of Life and Social Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 194:443-51. 2007
    ....
  23. ncbi request reprint High-dose glycine inhibits the loudness dependence of the auditory evoked potential (LDAEP) in healthy humans
    Barry V O'Neill
    Biological Psychiatry Research Unit, Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 195:85-93. 2007
    ..Despite considerable research, very little is known about the LDAEP's sensitivity to other neurotransmitter systems...
  24. ncbi request reprint Brain dynamics in the active vs. passive auditory oddball task: exploration of narrow-band EEG phase effects
    Robert J Barry
    Brain and Behaviour Research Institute and School of Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
    Clin Neurophysiol 118:2234-47. 2007
    ..passive auditory oddball tasks, using a novel conceptualisation of orthogonal phase effects...
  25. ncbi request reprint Differential effects of acute serotonin and dopamine depletion on prepulse inhibition and p50 suppression measures of sensorimotor and sensory gating in humans
    Collette Mann
    Behavioural Neuroscience Laboratory, School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Neuropsychopharmacology 33:1653-66. 2008
    ....
  26. ncbi request reprint The cognitive effects of modulating the glycine site of the NMDA receptor with high-dose glycine in healthy controls
    Colin Palmer
    Behavioural Neuroscience Laboratory, School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine, Monash University, Victoria, Australia
    Hum Psychopharmacol 23:151-9. 2008
    ....
  27. doi request reprint An examination of acute changes in serotonergic neurotransmission using the loudness dependence measure of auditory cortex evoked activity: effects of citalopram, escitalopram and sertraline
    Valérie Guille
    Biological Psychiatry Research Unit, Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Hum Psychopharmacol 23:231-41. 2008
    ..The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity of the LDAEP to acute augmentation in central serotonergic neurotransmission in humans...
  28. doi request reprint Effects of selective and combined serotonin and dopamine depletion on the loudness dependence of the auditory evoked potential (LDAEP) in humans
    Barry V O'Neill
    Biological Psychiatry Research Unit, Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Hum Psychopharmacol 23:301-12. 2008
    ..Accordingly we further examined the effects of selective serotonin, dopamine and simultaneous serotonin and dopamine depletion on the LDAEP in healthy subjects...
  29. doi request reprint The loudness dependence of the auditory evoked potential (LDAEP) as an in vivo biomarker of central serotonergic function in humans: rationale, evaluation and review of findings
    Barry V O'Neill
    Biological Psychiatry Research Unit, Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Hum Psychopharmacol 23:355-70. 2008
    ..Subsequently, this review was undertaken in an attempt to critically evaluate the potential role of the LDAEP as a marker of the central 5-HT function...
  30. ncbi request reprint Dynamics of narrow-band EEG phase effects in the passive auditory oddball task
    Robert J Barry
    Brain and Behaviour Research Institute and School of Psychology, University of Wollongong, Wollongong 2522, Australia
    Eur J Neurosci 24:291-304. 2006
    ....
  31. ncbi request reprint Suppression of P50 evoked potential component, schizotypal beliefs and smoking
    Rodney J Croft
    Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn 3122, Melbourne, Australia
    Psychiatry Res 128:53-62. 2004
    ..Covarying for age and NEO-V scale scores had little effect on these relations. The findings provide evidence of important confounds that would limit our ability to detect P50 suppression/symptom relations in schizophrenia...
  32. ncbi request reprint Effects of stimulant medications on children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and excessive beta activity in their EEG
    Adam R Clarke
    Brain and Behaviour Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong 2522, Australia
    Clin Neurophysiol 114:1729-37. 2003
    ..This study investigated the effects of stimulant medications on the Electroencephalography (EEG) of children with the combined type of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) together with excessive beta activity in their EEG...
  33. ncbi request reprint Examining the effects of electromagnetic fields emitted by GSM mobile phones on human event-related potentials and performance during an auditory task
    Denise L Hamblin
    Swinburne University of Technology, School of Biophysical Sciences and Electrical Engineering, PO Box 218, Hawthorn, Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Clin Neurophysiol 115:171-8. 2004
    ..Due to the widespread use of mobile phones (MP), it is important to determine whether they affect human physiology. The aim of this study was to explore the sensitivity of auditory event-related potentials to electromagnetic emissions...
  34. ncbi request reprint Mismatch negativity in schizophrenia: a family study
    Elvira Bramon
    Institute of Psychiatry, PO Box 63, De Crespigny Park, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AF, UK
    Schizophr Res 67:1-10. 2004
    ..We investigated whether MMN is a potential marker of genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia by comparing MMN in a group of patients with schizophrenia, their unaffected relatives, and controls...
  35. ncbi request reprint Pain perception, hypnosis and 40 Hz oscillations
    Rodney J Croft
    Department of Cognitive Neuroscience and Behaviour, Imperial College London, Medical Faculty, St Dunstan s Road, W68 RF, London, UK
    Int J Psychophysiol 46:101-8. 2002
    ..This study provides evidence for the role of gamma oscillations in the subjective experience of pain. Further, it is in keeping with the view that hypnosis involves the dissociation of prefrontal cortex from other neural functions...
  36. ncbi request reprint Event-related potentials in the auditory oddball as a function of EEG alpha phase at stimulus onset
    Robert J Barry
    Brain and Behaviour Research Institute and Department of Psychology, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
    Clin Neurophysiol 115:2593-601. 2004
    ....
  37. ncbi request reprint EOG correction: a comparison of four methods
    Rodney J Croft
    Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Psychophysiology 42:16-24. 2005
    ..72), VEMs (eta2>.60), and HEMs (eta2>.27). It is argued that the CB procedure adequately accounts for ocular artifact in the EEG. Reasons for the limitations of the other procedures are discussed...
  38. ncbi request reprint Muscarinic and nicotinic receptor modulation of object and spatial n-back working memory in humans
    Amity Green
    Behavioural Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Physiology, Monash Centre for Brain and Behaviour, PO Box 13F, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800, Australia
    Pharmacol Biochem Behav 81:575-84. 2005
    ....
  39. ncbi request reprint An evaluation of the sensitivity of the standardised field sobriety tests to detect the presence of amphetamine
    Beata Y Silber
    Drugs and Driving Research Unit, Centre for Neuropsychology, Swinburne University of Technology, P O Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria, 3122, Australia
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 182:153-9. 2005
    ....
  40. ncbi request reprint The acute effects of d-amphetamine and methamphetamine on attention and psychomotor performance
    Beata Y Silber
    Drugs and Driving Research Unit, Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, 400 Burwood Rd, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122, Australia
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 187:154-69. 2006
    ..It is not clear how the deleterious effects of amphetamines on driving performance are mediated in terms of select cognitive processes...
  41. ncbi request reprint Acute high-dose glycine attenuates mismatch negativity (MMN) in healthy human controls
    Sumie Leung
    Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 196:451-60. 2008
    ..However, no study has investigated the possible effects of high-dose glycine on MMN. Further, the physiological consequences of administering high-dose glycine in subjects with normal NMDA receptor function are unknown...
  42. ncbi request reprint Investigating evoked and induced electroencephalogram activity in task-related alpha power increases during an internally directed attention task
    Nicholas R Cooper
    Division of Neuroscience and Psychological Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, UK
    Neuroreport 17:205-8. 2006
    ..No experimental effects were observed for evoked activity. These results are not entirely consistent with proposals that 'paradoxical' alpha indexes the evoked inhibition of task irrelevant processing...
  43. ncbi request reprint Direct evidence that acutely enhancing serotonin with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram modulates the loudness dependence of the auditory evoked potential (LDAEP) marker of central serotonin function
    Pradeep J Nathan
    Behavioural Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Physiology, Monash Centre for Brain and Behaviour, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
    Hum Psychopharmacol 21:47-52. 2006
    ..Together the results provide further support for the validity of the LDAEP as a non-invasive in vivo measure of central serotonin function in humans...
  44. ncbi request reprint The effect of electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones on human sleep
    Sarah P Loughran
    Brain Sciences Institute, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia
    Neuroreport 16:1973-6. 2005
    ..These results are evidence that mobile phone exposure prior to sleep may promote rapid eye movement sleep and modify the sleep electroencephalogram in the first non-rapid eye movement sleep period...
  45. ncbi request reprint Estrogen prevents 5-HT1A receptor-induced disruptions of prepulse inhibition in healthy women
    Andrea Gogos
    Behavioural Neuroscience Laboratory, Mental Health Research Institute of Victoria, Parkville, Vic, Australia
    Neuropsychopharmacology 31:885-9. 2006
    ..Estrogen treatment, administered in the appropriate experimental conditions, prevented PPI deficits induced by 5-HT(1A) receptor activation and may therefore also play a protective role in sensorimotor gating deficits in schizophrenia...
  46. ncbi request reprint Issues relating to the subtraction phase in EOG artefact correction of the EEG
    Rodney J Croft
    Department of Cognitive Neuroscience and Behaviour, Imperial College Medical School, St Dunstans Road, W68RF, London, UK
    Int J Psychophysiol 44:187-95. 2002
    ..It is argued that such EOG correction error is small relative to both artefact rejection procedures and to normal variability found in ERP studies, and that it is less pernicious than artefact rejection procedures...
  47. ncbi request reprint Differential relations between heart rate and skin conductance, and public speaking anxiety
    Rodney J Croft
    Brain and Behaviour Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong 2522, Australia
    J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry 35:259-71. 2004
    ..Results suggest that in a non-clinical population, the interaction of ANS activity and belief structure is an important determinant of PSA, and may account for variable findings in the literature...
  48. ncbi request reprint Paradox lost? Exploring the role of alpha oscillations during externally vs. internally directed attention and the implications for idling and inhibition hypotheses
    Nicholas R Cooper
    Faculty of Medicine, Department of Cognitive Neuroscience and Behaviour, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Charing Cross Hospital, St Dunstans Road, London W6 8RP, UK
    Int J Psychophysiol 47:65-74. 2003
    ....
  49. ncbi request reprint EEG differences between good and poor responders to methylphenidate in boys with the inattentive type of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
    Adam R Clarke
    Brain and Behaviour Research Institute and Department of Psychology, University of Wollongong, 2522, Wollongong, Australia
    Clin Neurophysiol 113:1191-8. 2002
    ..This study investigated electroencephalographic (EEG) differences between good and poor responders to methylphenidate in boys with the Inattentive type of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)...
  50. ncbi request reprint Response inhibition deficits in obsessive-compulsive disorder
    Shelley Bannon
    Department of Psychology, University of Wollongong, Australia
    Psychiatry Res 110:165-74. 2002
    ..It was demonstrated that OCD subjects exhibit deficits in behavioural and cognitive inhibition, which together may underlie the repetitive symptomatic behaviours of the disorder, such as compulsions and obsessions...
  51. ncbi request reprint Is the P300 wave an endophenotype for schizophrenia? A meta-analysis and a family study
    Elvira Bramon
    Institute of Psychiatry, P O Box 63, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK
    Neuroimage 27:960-8. 2005
    ..We assessed the usefulness of the P300 wave as endophenotype for schizophrenia by means of a meta-analysis of the literature as well as our own family study...
  52. ncbi request reprint Effects of stimulant medications on the EEG of children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Predominantly Inattentive type
    Adam R Clarke
    Brain and Behaviour Research Institute and Department of Psychology, University of Wollongong, Australia
    Int J Psychophysiol 47:129-37. 2003
    ..These results suggest that stimulants act to increase cortical arousal in children with ADHD, normalising their EEG...
  53. ncbi request reprint EEG activity in girls with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
    Adam R Clarke
    Brain and Behaviour Research Institute and Department of Psychology, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia
    Clin Neurophysiol 114:319-28. 2003
    ..This study investigated the EEG of girls with Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)...
  54. ncbi request reprint Quantitative EEG in low-IQ children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
    Adam R Clarke
    School of Psychology, Brain and Behaviour Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong 2522, NSW, Australia
    Clin Neurophysiol 117:1708-14. 2006
    ..This study investigated EEG differences between children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) and matched control subjects, with either normal or low IQs...
  55. ncbi request reprint Effects of methylphenidate on EEG coherence in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
    Adam R Clarke
    Brain and Behaviour Research Institute and Department of Psychology, University of Wollongong, Wollongong 2522, Australia
    Int J Psychophysiol 58:4-11. 2005
    ..These results suggest the existence of structural as well as functional brain dysfunction in AD/HD...
  56. ncbi request reprint Is the loudness dependence of the auditory evoked potential a sensitive and selective in vivo marker of central serotonergic function?
    Pradeep J Nathan
    Neuropsychopharmacology 30:1584-5; author reply 1586-7. 2005
  57. ncbi request reprint Coherence in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and excess beta activity in their EEG
    Adam R Clarke
    Brain and Behaviour Research Institute and School of Psychology, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia
    Clin Neurophysiol 118:1472-9. 2007
    ....
  58. doi request reprint One-channel EOG artifact correction: an analytic approach
    Lars Matthäus
    Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Lubeck, Lubeck, Germany
    Psychophysiology 45:569-78. 2008
    ..Experimental results from 13 subjects are shown, supporting the theoretical prediction of optimal correction...