Megan Spencer-Smith

Summary

Affiliation: Royal Children's Hospital
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Does timing of brain lesion have an impact on children's attention?
    Megan Spencer-Smith
    Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia
    Dev Neuropsychol 36:353-66. 2011
  2. doi request reprint Long-term benefits of home-based preventive care for preterm infants: a randomized trial
    Megan M Spencer-Smith
    Critical Care and Neurosciences, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Victoria, Australia
    Pediatrics 130:1094-101. 2012
  3. doi request reprint Neuropsychological profile of children with subcortical band heterotopia
    Megan Spencer-Smith
    Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia
    Dev Med Child Neurol 51:909-16. 2009
  4. doi request reprint Healthy and abnormal development of the prefrontal cortex
    Megan Spencer-Smith
    Critical Care and Neurosciences, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children s Hospital, FlemingtonRoad, Parkville, VIC 3054, Australia
    Dev Neurorehabil 12:279-97. 2009
  5. doi request reprint Does early age at brain insult predict worse outcome? Neuropsychological implications
    Vicki Anderson
    Department of Psychology, Royal Children s Hospital, Flemington Road, Parkville, Victoria, 3052, Australia
    J Pediatr Psychol 35:716-27. 2010
  6. doi request reprint Childhood brain insult: can age at insult help us predict outcome?
    Vicki Anderson
    Department of Psychology, Royal Children s Hospital, Flemington Road, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
    Brain 132:45-56. 2009
  7. doi request reprint Children's executive functions: are they poorer after very early brain insult
    Vicki Anderson
    Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia
    Neuropsychologia 48:2041-50. 2010
  8. doi request reprint Executive function following child stroke: the impact of lesion size
    Brian Long
    Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia
    Dev Neuropsychol 36:971-87. 2011
  9. doi request reprint Do children really recover better? Neurobehavioural plasticity after early brain insult
    Vicki Anderson
    Department of Psychology, Royal Children s Hospital, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia
    Brain 134:2197-221. 2011

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. doi request reprint Does timing of brain lesion have an impact on children's attention?
    Megan Spencer-Smith
    Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia
    Dev Neuropsychol 36:353-66. 2011
    ..This pattern of results was particularly evident for encoding and shifting attention. Findings highlight vulnerability of the immature brain to lesions and identify critical periods in development for attention skills...
  2. doi request reprint Long-term benefits of home-based preventive care for preterm infants: a randomized trial
    Megan M Spencer-Smith
    Critical Care and Neurosciences, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Victoria, Australia
    Pediatrics 130:1094-101. 2012
    ..This study aimed to determine the longer-term effectiveness of the program by reviewing caregivers and children at preschool age...
  3. doi request reprint Neuropsychological profile of children with subcortical band heterotopia
    Megan Spencer-Smith
    Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia
    Dev Med Child Neurol 51:909-16. 2009
    ..This study aimed to characterize further the phenotype of patients with SBH by describing the neuropsychological profiles of children...
  4. doi request reprint Healthy and abnormal development of the prefrontal cortex
    Megan Spencer-Smith
    Critical Care and Neurosciences, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children s Hospital, FlemingtonRoad, Parkville, VIC 3054, Australia
    Dev Neurorehabil 12:279-97. 2009
    ..Animal studies and preliminary child studies have identified timing of brain lesion as a key predictor in determining functional outcome following early brain lesions...
  5. doi request reprint Does early age at brain insult predict worse outcome? Neuropsychological implications
    Vicki Anderson
    Department of Psychology, Royal Children s Hospital, Flemington Road, Parkville, Victoria, 3052, Australia
    J Pediatr Psychol 35:716-27. 2010
    ..This view was investigated by comparing neurobehavioral outcomes of children sustaining EBI at different developmental stages (gestation to late childhood)...
  6. doi request reprint Childhood brain insult: can age at insult help us predict outcome?
    Vicki Anderson
    Department of Psychology, Royal Children s Hospital, Flemington Road, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
    Brain 132:45-56. 2009
    ....
  7. doi request reprint Children's executive functions: are they poorer after very early brain insult
    Vicki Anderson
    Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia
    Neuropsychologia 48:2041-50. 2010
    ..With the exception of attentional control, skills emerging at time of insult were found to be more vulnerable to disruption than those previously established, supporting the 'early vulnerability' model for EBI...
  8. doi request reprint Executive function following child stroke: the impact of lesion size
    Brian Long
    Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia
    Dev Neuropsychol 36:971-87. 2011
    ..Difficulties in behavioral aspects of EF were most striking, with problems identified across a wide range of behaviors. Lesion size impacted on EF, with large lesions (greater than 25% of brain volume) proving the most detrimental...
  9. doi request reprint Do children really recover better? Neurobehavioural plasticity after early brain insult
    Vicki Anderson
    Department of Psychology, Royal Children s Hospital, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia
    Brain 134:2197-221. 2011
    ..Where a child's outcome falls along this continuum depends on injury factors (severity, nature, age) and environmental influences (family, sociodemographic factors, interventions)...