U Proske

Summary

Affiliation: Monash University
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. pmc The effect of quadriceps muscle fatigue on position matching at the knee
    Nathan J Givoni
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800, Australia
    J Physiol 584:111-9. 2007
  2. pmc Sensory receptors in monotremes
    U Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 353:1187-98. 1998
  3. pmc Muscle tenderness from exercise: mechanisms?
    Uwe Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Victoria, Australia
    J Physiol 564:1. 2005
  4. ncbi Force-matching errors after eccentric exercise attributed to muscle soreness
    U Proske
    Departments of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol 30:576-9. 2003
  5. pmc Muscle damage from eccentric exercise: mechanism, mechanical signs, adaptation and clinical applications
    U Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    J Physiol 537:333-45. 2001
  6. doi The discovery of two types of fusimotor fibre by Peter Matthews
    Uwe Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia
    Exp Physiol 93:50-2. 2008
  7. doi The distribution and abundance of muscle spindles
    Uwe Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
    Brain Res Bull 75:502-3. 2008
  8. pmc The kinaesthetic senses
    Uwe Proske
    Department of Physiology, PO Box 13F, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia
    J Physiol 587:4139-46. 2009
  9. ncbi Electrolocation in the platypus--some speculations
    Uwe Proske
    Department of Physiology, P O Box 13F, Monash University VIC 3800, Melbourne, Australia
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 136:821-5. 2003
  10. ncbi Kinesthesia: the role of muscle receptors
    Uwe Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Melbourne, Victoria 3800, Australia
    Muscle Nerve 34:545-58. 2006

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications63

  1. pmc The effect of quadriceps muscle fatigue on position matching at the knee
    Nathan J Givoni
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800, Australia
    J Physiol 584:111-9. 2007
    ..The exercise effects on proprioception may have implications for sports injuries and for evaluation of the factors leading to falls in the elderly...
  2. pmc Sensory receptors in monotremes
    U Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 353:1187-98. 1998
    ..Perhaps the electric sense is used to detect moving prey in moist soil...
  3. pmc Muscle tenderness from exercise: mechanisms?
    Uwe Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Victoria, Australia
    J Physiol 564:1. 2005
  4. ncbi Force-matching errors after eccentric exercise attributed to muscle soreness
    U Proske
    Departments of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol 30:576-9. 2003
    ..It implies that muscle soreness may contribute to the weakness experienced after a period of unaccustomed eccentric exercise...
  5. pmc Muscle damage from eccentric exercise: mechanism, mechanical signs, adaptation and clinical applications
    U Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    J Physiol 537:333-45. 2001
    ..The ability of muscle to rapidly adapt following the damage from eccentric exercise raises the possibility of clinical applications of mild eccentric exercise, such as for protecting a muscle against more major injuries...
  6. doi The discovery of two types of fusimotor fibre by Peter Matthews
    Uwe Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia
    Exp Physiol 93:50-2. 2008
  7. doi The distribution and abundance of muscle spindles
    Uwe Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
    Brain Res Bull 75:502-3. 2008
    ..Large muscles comprising many fascicles will therefore have more spindles than smaller muscles...
  8. pmc The kinaesthetic senses
    Uwe Proske
    Department of Physiology, PO Box 13F, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia
    J Physiol 587:4139-46. 2009
    ..Involvement of motor command signals in kinaesthesia has implications for interpretations of certain clinical conditions...
  9. ncbi Electrolocation in the platypus--some speculations
    Uwe Proske
    Department of Physiology, P O Box 13F, Monash University VIC 3800, Melbourne, Australia
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 136:821-5. 2003
    ..Much of this is speculation, and there is still much to be learned about electroreception in the platypus and its fellow monotreme, the echidna...
  10. ncbi Kinesthesia: the role of muscle receptors
    Uwe Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Melbourne, Victoria 3800, Australia
    Muscle Nerve 34:545-58. 2006
    ..This has consequences for kinesthesia in the presence of the force of gravity. A contribution from central feedback mechanisms to the sense of effort is relevant to certain clinical conditions...
  11. ncbi The role of muscle receptors in the detection of movements
    U Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
    Prog Neurobiol 60:85-96. 2000
    ..In conclusion, a number of points of uncertainly have been revealed in this area and these should be the subject of future experiments...
  12. ncbi Do cross-bridges contribute to the tension during stretch of passive muscle?
    U Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
    J Muscle Res Cell Motil 20:433-42. 1999
    ....
  13. ncbi What is the role of muscle receptors in proprioception?
    Uwe Proske
    Department of Physiology, P O Box 13F, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800, Australia
    Muscle Nerve 31:780-7. 2005
    ..A challenge for the future will be to reveal how the centrally derived sense of effort and peripherally derived afferent information interact to give us our kinesthetic sense...
  14. ncbi Force matching errors following eccentric exercise
    U Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, PO Box 13F, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
    Hum Mov Sci 23:365-78. 2004
    ..Both procedures led to errors in the same direction as those seen after eccentric exercise...
  15. ncbi Identifying athletes at risk of hamstring strains and how to protect them
    U Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol 31:546-50. 2004
    ..This approach seems to work because evidence from a group of athletes who have implemented such a programme shows a significant reduction in the incidence of hamstring strains...
  16. ncbi Mechanical sensitivity of muscle afferents in a nerve treated with colchicine
    U Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
    Exp Brain Res 119:391-8. 1998
    ..These experiments suggest that an important influence is exerted by the cell body on the peripheral terminals of mechanoreceptors to confer on them their normal response properties...
  17. ncbi Signalling properties of muscle spindles and tendon organs
    Uwe Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melboume, Victoria, Australia
    Adv Exp Med Biol 508:5-12. 2002
    ..It was found that only when motor units were contracted which had a direct action on a tendon organ did it signal the rise in tension. The finding raises questions about the role of tendon organs as monitors of muscle tension...
  18. ncbi Damage to skeletal muscle from eccentric exercise
    Uwe Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800, Australia
    Exerc Sport Sci Rev 33:98-104. 2005
    ..Aspects discussed include the decline in active tension, increase in passive tension, shift in length-tension relation, soreness, swelling, and disturbed proprioception...
  19. ncbi Vibration sensitivity of cat muscle spindles at short muscle lengths
    U Proske
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
    Exp Brain Res 124:166-72. 1999
    ..The vibratory stimulus, applied transversely, reaches the sensory ending via these strands which, as non-muscle tissue, do not alter their mechanical state as a result of muscle conditioning...
  20. ncbi Force matching at the elbow joint is disturbed by muscle soreness
    N S Weerakkody
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Somatosens Mot Res 20:27-32. 2003
    ..That, in turn, disturbs the relationship between the centrally generated effort and motor output, leading to matching errors...
  21. ncbi An investigation into mechanisms of reflex reinforcement by the Jendrassik manoeuvre
    J E Gregory
    Department of Physiology, P O Box 13F, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia
    Exp Brain Res 138:366-74. 2001
    ..While this confirms the previously prevailing view, none of the lingering uncertainties associated with the methods used now remains...
  22. ncbi Effects of local pressure and vibration on muscle pain from eccentric exercise and hypertonic saline
    N S Weerakkody
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800, Australia
    Pain 105:425-35. 2003
    ..It is concluded that the vibration effects are the result of stimulation of large-diameter mechanoreceptive afferents in the muscle which, it is speculated, play a role in generating DOMS...
  23. ncbi Rises in whole muscle passive tension of mammalian muscle after eccentric contractions at different lengths
    N P Whitehead
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800, Australia
    J Appl Physiol 95:1224-34. 2003
    ..One is injury contractures in damaged muscle fibers tending to raise passive tension; the other is the presence of disrupted sarcomeres in series with still-functioning sarcomeres tending to reduce it...
  24. ncbi Effect of eccentric exercise on position sense at the human forearm in different postures
    L D Walsh
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia
    J Appl Physiol 100:1109-16. 2006
    ..In gravity-neutral tasks like counterweighted or horizontal matching, a change in the effort-force relationship after exercise leaves matching accuracy unaffected...
  25. pmc Changes in passive tension of muscle in humans and animals after eccentric exercise
    N P Whitehead
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia
    J Physiol 533:593-604. 2001
    ..6. It is suggested that the rise in passive tension in both human and animal muscles after eccentric contractions is the result of development of injury contractures in damaged muscle fibres...
  26. ncbi Human hamstring muscles adapt to eccentric exercise by changing optimum length
    C L Brockett
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3168, Australia
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 33:783-90. 2001
    ..The purpose of this study was to provide evidence from muscle mechanical properties of a proposed mechanism for this training effect in human hamstring muscles...
  27. ncbi Summing responses of cat soleus muscle spindles to combined static and dynamic fusimotor stimulation(1)
    J B Fallon
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Victoria 3168, Clayton, Australia
    Brain Res 888:348-355. 2001
    ..340 (+/-0.020 S.E.M.). These findings were interpreted in terms of a model of the muscle spindle where responses to dynamic fusimotor stimulation arise at one impulse generating site, and static fusimotor responses arise at another...
  28. ncbi The role of the length-tension curve in the control of movement
    D L Morgan
    Department of Electrical and Computer Systemis Engineering, Monash University, Melboume, Vic, Australia
    Adv Exp Med Biol 508:489-94. 2002
    ..Evidence for this is presented for muscles from rats trained on a treadmill, and from motor units of the gastrocnemius muscle of the cat...
  29. pmc Responses of electroreceptors in the platypus bill to steady and alternating potentials
    J E Gregory
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Australia
    J Physiol 408:391-404. 1989
    ..Furthermore, they are able to respond to both steady and rapidly changing voltage gradients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)..
  30. pmc Receptors in the bill of the platypus
    J E Gregory
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
    J Physiol 400:349-66. 1988
    ..This in turn emphasizes that monotremes are a highly evolved group which split off from the main mammalian stem a long time ago...
  31. ncbi The shift in muscle's length-tension relation after exercise attributed to increased series compliance
    J E Gregory
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Vic, Australia
    Eur J Appl Physiol 99:431-41. 2007
    ..It is concluded that after a series of eccentric contractions of a muscle, the fall in force is the result of a number of interdependent factors, not all of which are a direct consequence of the damage process...
  32. pmc Position sense at the human forearm in the horizontal plane during loading and vibration of elbow muscles
    G E Ansems
    Department of Physiology, PO Box 13F, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia
    J Physiol 576:445-55. 2006
    ..When the arm is loaded, an additional signal of central origin contributes, but only if the load is moved...
  33. ncbi Fatigue in mammalian skeletal muscle stimulated under computer control
    A K Wise
    Departments of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia
    J Appl Physiol 90:189-97. 2001
    ..Similar results were obtained when an intermittent, rather than a continuous, stimulation protocol was used. These findings indicate that distributed stimulation has important advantages over other methods for applications such as FES...
  34. ncbi Effect of muscle fatigue on the sense of limb position and movement
    T J Allen
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, 13F, Melbourne, Victoria, 3800, Australia
    Exp Brain Res 170:30-8. 2006
    ....
  35. ncbi Damage to different motor units from active lengthening of the medial gastrocnemius muscle of the cat
    C L Brockett
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800, Australia
    J Appl Physiol 92:1104-10. 2002
    ..Statistical analysis showed that a motor unit's optimum length for a contraction, relative to the whole muscle optimum, was a better indicator of the unit's susceptibility to damage from active lengthenings than was motor unit type...
  36. pmc Passive mechanical properties of the medial gastrocnemius muscle of the cat
    N P Whitehead
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    J Physiol 536:893-903. 2001
    ....
  37. pmc The influence of muscle spindle discharge on the human H reflex and the monosynaptic reflex in the cat
    S A Wood
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
    J Physiol 497:279-90. 1996
    ..5. Thus this study presents evidence that monosynaptic reflexes are depressed by the on-going discharge of muscle spindles in the homonymous muscle, but that this depression does not appear to involve "classical' presynaptic inhibition...
  38. pmc Human forearm position sense after fatigue of elbow flexor muscles
    L D Walsh
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800, Australia
    J Physiol 558:705-15. 2004
    ..It was concluded that while a role for muscle spindles in kinaesthesia cannot be excluded, detailed information about static limb position can be derived from the effort required to support the limb against the force of gravity...
  39. ncbi Tendon organs as monitors of muscle damage from eccentric contractions
    J E Gregory
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, PO Box 13F, Melbourne, VIC 3800, Australia
    Exp Brain Res 151:346-55. 2003
    ..The findings are relevant to known changes in proprioception and motor control after eccentric exercise...
  40. ncbi Responses of muscle spindles following a series of eccentric contractions
    J E Gregory
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Exp Brain Res 157:234-40. 2004
    ..It is concluded that the intrafusal fibres of muscle spindles are not prone to damage of the kind seen in extrafusal fibres after a series of eccentric contractions...
  41. pmc Muscle spindle signals combine with the sense of effort to indicate limb position
    J A Winter
    Department of Physiology, PO Box 13F, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia
    J Physiol 568:1035-46. 2005
    ....
  42. ncbi Damage to the human quadriceps muscle from eccentric exercise and the training effect
    E J Bowers
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800, Australia
    J Sports Sci 22:1005-14. 2004
    ..This is despite the fact that the quadriceps routinely undergoes eccentric contractions in everyday activities...
  43. pmc Effect of eccentric muscle contractions on Golgi tendon organ responses to passive and active tension in the cat
    J E Gregory
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia
    J Physiol 538:209-18. 2002
    ..Tendon organs appear to be remarkably reliable in signalling whole muscle tension, whether passive or active, and even after the muscle's force production has been disturbed by fatigue or eccentric exercise...
  44. pmc The influence of fatigue on damage from eccentric contractions in the gastrocnemius muscle of the cat
    D L Morgan
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
    J Physiol 561:841-50. 2004
    ..These observations were seen to be consistent with predictions of the proposed mechanism for the damage process...
  45. pmc Responses of electroreceptors in the snout of the echidna
    J E Gregory
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
    J Physiol 414:521-38. 1989
    ..It remains to be determined what kinds of sources of electric fields the animal encounters in its normal habitat...
  46. ncbi A new strategy for controlling the level of activation in artificially stimulated muscle
    T I Brown
    Biomedical Engineering Centre, the Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
    IEEE Trans Rehabil Eng 7:167-73. 1999
    ..This has important implications in functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) as well as in enabling experiments to be conducted to characterize the biomechanical behavior of partially activated fast and mixed muscle...
  47. ncbi Matching different levels of isometric torque in elbow flexor muscles after eccentric exercise
    N Weerakkody
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Exp Brain Res 149:141-50. 2003
    ..One forearm was placed at various angles and its reference torque was matched by the other, the indicator, always at 90 degrees. Again, matching errors were consistent with an interpretation based on a match of effort rather than torque...
  48. ncbi An investigation of the Jendrassik manoeuvre
    J E Gregory
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Victoria, Australia
    Acta Physiol Pharmacol Bulg 26:171-5. 2001
    ..A remaining, untested mechanism is the modulation of oligosynaptic pathways that may contribute to the largely monosynaptic reflex response...
  49. ncbi On the branching of motoneurons
    D L Morgan
    Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
    Muscle Nerve 24:372-9. 2001
    ..28 microm and a daughter-to-parent ratio of 1.48 at each level of branching. It is proposed that the main features of the model are likely to apply to all motoneurons...
  50. pmc The effect of fatigue from exercise on human limb position sense
    Trevor J Allen
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800, Australia
    J Physiol 588:1369-77. 2010
    ....
  51. ncbi Popping sarcomere hypothesis explains stretch-induced muscle damage
    David L Morgan
    Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol 31:541-5. 2004
    ..5. The pattern of adaptation is consistent with the number of sarcomeres in series in a muscle being modulated by exercise, especially the range of muscle lengths over which eccentric exercise regularly occurs...
  52. doi Illusions of forearm displacement during vibration of elbow muscles in humans
    Olivia White
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Vic, 3800, Australia
    Exp Brain Res 192:113-20. 2009
    ..These observations show that in an arm matching task the way in which muscles of both arms are conditioned can have an influence on matching performance, including the ability to indicate a perceived illusion...
  53. ncbi Evidence from proprioception of fusimotor coactivation during voluntary contractions in humans
    Trevor J Allen
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia
    Exp Physiol 93:391-8. 2008
    ..The distribution of errors is therefore seen to be a reflection of fusimotor recruitment thresholds. For elbow flexors most, but not all, fusimotor fibres appear to be recruited by 10% of a maximal contraction...
  54. ncbi Changes in passive tension after stretch of unexercised and eccentrically exercised human plantarflexor muscles
    Simone Reisman
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, PO Box 13F, Melbourne, VIC 3800, Australia
    Exp Brain Res 193:545-54. 2009
    ..These observations provide a physiological basis for the effects of passive stretches on skeletal muscle and help to explain why they are used as a popular warm-up strategy...
  55. ncbi Warm-up stretches reduce sensations of stiffness and soreness after eccentric exercise
    Simone Reisman
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 37:929-36. 2005
    ..We have tested the idea that warm-up stretches might reduce levels of passive tension to reduce sensations of stiffness and soreness after eccentric exercise...
  56. pmc Effects of muscle conditioning on position sense at the human forearm during loading or fatigue of elbow flexors and the role of the sense of effort
    Trevor J Allen
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800, Australia
    J Physiol 580:423-34. 2007
    ..Loading the arm produces predictable changes in motor output and afferent feedback whereas changes after exercise are unpredictable. This difference leads to exercise-dependent errors...
  57. ncbi Limb position sense, proprioceptive drift and muscle thixotropy at the human elbow joint
    A Tsay
    School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Vic, Australia
    J Physiol 592:2679-94. 2014
    ..These experiments argue for a receptor-based mechanism for proprioceptive drift and suggest that to align the two forearms, the brain monitors the difference between the afferent signals from the two arms. ..
  58. ncbi ATP suppresses activity in slowly adapting but not rapidly adapting mechanoreceptors in toad skin
    James B Fallon
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
    Neuroreport 13:1443-6. 2002
    ..Our results indicate that while ATP may modulate the responses of specific touch receptors, it is not involved in transducing touch into nerve impulses...
  59. ncbi Predicting hamstring strain injury in elite athletes
    Camilla L Brockett
    Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 36:379-87. 2004
    ..Here the prediction is tested that optimum lengths of previously injured hamstrings are shorter and therefore more prone to eccentric damage than uninjured muscles...
  60. ncbi Eccentric exercise increases EMG amplitude and force fluctuations during submaximal contractions of elbow flexor muscles
    John G Semmler
    School of Molecular and Biomedical Science, Univ of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 103:979-89. 2007
    ..These data indicate that eccentric exercise results in impaired motor control and altered neural drive to elbow flexor muscles, particularly at low forces, suggesting altered motor unit activation after eccentric exercise...
  61. pmc Can all residual force enhancement be explained by sarcomere non-uniformities?
    David L Morgan
    J Physiol 578:613-5; author reply 617-20. 2007
  62. pmc Sarcomere popping requires stretch over a range where total tension decreases with length
    David L Morgan
    J Physiol 574:627-8; author reply 629-30. 2006
  63. pmc Motor commands contribute to human position sense
    Simon C Gandevia
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, Barker Street, Randwick, Sydney, NSW 2031, Australia
    J Physiol 571:703-10. 2006
    ..These results establish for the first time a definitive role for 'outflow' signals in position sense...