Luciano B Beheregaray

Summary

Affiliation: Macquarie University
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Twenty years of phylogeography: the state of the field and the challenges for the Southern Hemisphere
    Luciano B Beheregaray
    Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
    Mol Ecol 17:3754-74. 2008
  2. ncbi request reprint Genes record a prehistoric volcano eruption in the Galápagos
    Luciano B Beheregaray
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 8106, USA
    Science 302:75. 2003
  3. pmc Giant tortoises are not so slow: rapid diversification and biogeographic consensus in the Galápagos
    Luciano B Beheregaray
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale Institute of Biospheric Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 8106, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:6514-9. 2004
  4. pmc Cryptic biodiversity in a changing world
    Luciano B Beheregaray
    Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
    J Biol 6:9. 2007
  5. doi request reprint Genetic structure of a recent climate change-driven range extension
    Sam C Banks
    Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, 2109 NSW, Australia
    Mol Ecol 19:2011-24. 2010
  6. pmc Phylogeographic history and gene flow among giant Galápagos tortoises on southern Isabela Island
    Claudio Ciofi
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA
    Genetics 172:1727-44. 2006
  7. pmc Historical DNA analysis reveals living descendants of an extinct species of Galápagos tortoise
    Nikos Poulakakis
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:15464-9. 2008
  8. pmc Five cryptic species in the amazonian catfish Centromochlus existimatus identified based on biogeographic predictions and genetic data
    Georgina M Cooke
    Molecular Ecology Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    PLoS ONE 7:e48800. 2012
  9. ncbi request reprint Oceanic variability and coastal topography shape genetic structure in a long-dispersing sea urchin
    Sam C Banks
    Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales 2109, Australia
    Ecology 88:3055-64. 2007
  10. doi request reprint A recent shark radiation: molecular phylogeny, biogeography and speciation of wobbegong sharks (family: Orectolobidae)
    Shannon Corrigan
    Molecular Ecology Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 52:205-16. 2009

Detail Information

Publications24

  1. doi request reprint Twenty years of phylogeography: the state of the field and the challenges for the Southern Hemisphere
    Luciano B Beheregaray
    Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
    Mol Ecol 17:3754-74. 2008
    ..I expect the information and views presented here will assist in promoting international collaborative work in phylogeography and in guiding research efforts at both regional and global levels...
  2. ncbi request reprint Genes record a prehistoric volcano eruption in the Galápagos
    Luciano B Beheregaray
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 8106, USA
    Science 302:75. 2003
  3. pmc Giant tortoises are not so slow: rapid diversification and biogeographic consensus in the Galápagos
    Luciano B Beheregaray
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale Institute of Biospheric Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 8106, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:6514-9. 2004
    ..The endangered giant Galápagos tortoises represent a rapid allopatric radiation and further exemplify evolutionary processes in one of the world's greatest natural laboratories of evolution...
  4. pmc Cryptic biodiversity in a changing world
    Luciano B Beheregaray
    Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
    J Biol 6:9. 2007
    ..Two new studies challenge paradigms about cryptic biodiversity and highlight the importance of adding a historical and biogeographic dimension to biodiversity research...
  5. doi request reprint Genetic structure of a recent climate change-driven range extension
    Sam C Banks
    Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, 2109 NSW, Australia
    Mol Ecol 19:2011-24. 2010
    ..Thus, ocean circulation changes have improved the climatic suitability of novel habitat for C. rodgersii and provided the supply of recruits necessary for colonization...
  6. pmc Phylogeographic history and gene flow among giant Galápagos tortoises on southern Isabela Island
    Claudio Ciofi
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA
    Genetics 172:1727-44. 2006
    ..These genetic studies illuminate taxonomic distinctions as well as provide guidance to possible repatriation programs aimed at countering the rapid population declines of these spectacular animals...
  7. pmc Historical DNA analysis reveals living descendants of an extinct species of Galápagos tortoise
    Nikos Poulakakis
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:15464-9. 2008
    ....
  8. pmc Five cryptic species in the amazonian catfish Centromochlus existimatus identified based on biogeographic predictions and genetic data
    Georgina M Cooke
    Molecular Ecology Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    PLoS ONE 7:e48800. 2012
    ..Our findings suggest that the diversity of Amazonian ichthyofauna is vastly underestimated and highlight the relevance of biogeographic predictions to guide sampling efforts in ecologically complex and under-studied ecosystems...
  9. ncbi request reprint Oceanic variability and coastal topography shape genetic structure in a long-dispersing sea urchin
    Sam C Banks
    Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales 2109, Australia
    Ecology 88:3055-64. 2007
    ..If proven consistent across species, our findings suggest that the optimal scale for fisheries management and reserve design should vary among localities in relation to regional oceanographic variability and coastal geography...
  10. doi request reprint A recent shark radiation: molecular phylogeny, biogeography and speciation of wobbegong sharks (family: Orectolobidae)
    Shannon Corrigan
    Molecular Ecology Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 52:205-16. 2009
    ..The most recent scenario was influenced by changes in oceanography and the emergence of biogeographic barriers related to Pleistocene glacial cycles in Australian waters...
  11. pmc A rapid fish radiation associated with the last sea-level changes in southern Brazil: the silverside Odontesthes perugiae complex
    Luciano B Beheregaray
    Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 269:65-73. 2002
    ..These features were related to a marine-estuarine origin of the radiation. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first molecular phylogeographic survey of a coastal radiation in South America...
  12. pmc Evolution of seahorses' upright posture was linked to Oligocene expansion of seagrass habitats
    Peter R Teske
    Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales 2109, Australia
    Biol Lett 5:521-3. 2009
    ....
  13. doi request reprint Islands of water in a sea of dry land: hydrological regime predicts genetic diversity and dispersal in a widespread fish from Australia's arid zone, the golden perch (Macquaria ambigua)
    Leanne K Faulks
    Molecular Ecology Laboratory, Macquarie University, Department of Biological Sciences Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
    Mol Ecol 19:4723-37. 2010
    ..This study contributes to our understanding of the influence of spatial and temporal heterogeneity on population and landscape processes...
  14. pmc The use of carcasses for the analysis of cetacean population genetic structure: a comparative study in two dolphin species
    Kerstin Bilgmann
    Marine Mammal Research Group, Graduate School of the Environment, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    PLoS ONE 6:e20103. 2011
    ..This can lead to a failure in identifying management units for conservation. Therefore, this risk should be carefully assessed when planning population genetic studies of cetaceans...
  15. doi request reprint Male reproductive success increases with alliance size in Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus)
    Joanna Wiszniewski
    Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    J Anim Ecol 81:423-31. 2012
    ..5. Together, our genetic and behavioural analyses demonstrate that alliance formation between male dolphins is a successful strategy to enhance reproductive output...
  16. doi request reprint Tri-locus sequence data reject a "Gondwanan origin hypothesis" for the African/South Pacific crab genus Hymenosoma
    Peter R Teske
    Molecular Ecology Lab, Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 53:23-33. 2009
    ....
  17. doi request reprint Divergent natural selection with gene flow along major environmental gradients in Amazonia: insights from genome scans, population genetics and phylogeography of the characin fish Triportheus albus
    Georgina M Cooke
    Molecular Ecology Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
    Mol Ecol 21:2410-27. 2012
    ..In addition, they have important implications for measures of biodiversity and evolutionary potential in one of the world's most diverse and iconic ecosystems...
  18. doi request reprint Influences of past climatic changes on historical population structure and demography of a cosmopolitan marine predator, the common dolphin (genus Delphinus)
    Ana R Amaral
    Centro de Biologia Ambiental, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749 016, Lisbon, Portugal
    Mol Ecol 21:4854-71. 2012
    ....
  19. doi request reprint Hybridization of Southern Hemisphere blue whale subspecies and a sympatric area off Antarctica: impacts of whaling or climate change?
    Catherine R M Attard
    Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
    Mol Ecol 21:5715-27. 2012
    ..Our findings challenge the current knowledge about the breeding behaviour of the world's largest animal and provide key information that can be incorporated into management and conservation practices for this endangered species...
  20. doi request reprint Species tree of a recent radiation: the subfamily Delphininae (Cetacea, Mammalia)
    Ana R Amaral
    Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Biologia Ambiental, Campo Grande, Lisbon, Portugal
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 64:243-53. 2012
    ..This study further illustrates how methods of species-tree inference can be very sensitive both to the characteristics of the dataset and the evolutionary processes affecting the evolution of the group under study...
  21. doi request reprint Microsatellite markers for the roman, Chrysoblephus laticeps (Teleostei: Sparidae), an overexploited seabream from South Africa
    Peter R Teske
    Molecular Ecology Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia, South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity, Grahamstown 6140, South Africa, Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science, Rhodes University, Grahamstown 6140, South Africa
    Mol Ecol Resour 9:1162-4. 2009
    ..The markers will be useful to detect whether populations resident in MPAs along the South African coast are genetically connected, and whether there is spillover of recruits into adjacent exploited areas...
  22. doi request reprint Intron-spanning primers for the amplification of the nuclear ANT gene in decapod crustaceans
    Peter R Teske
    Molecular Ecology Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
    Mol Ecol Resour 9:774-6. 2009
    ..While the intron is suitable for phylogeographical/population genetic studies and to identify cryptic speciation, the second exon region is sufficiently long to provide signal at both the phylogeographical and phylogenetic levels...
  23. ncbi request reprint Genetic evidence for sex-biased dispersal in resident bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus)
    Luciana M Möller
    Marine Mammal Research Group, Graduate School of the Environment, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, 2109, Australia
    Mol Ecol 13:1607-12. 2004
    ..Our genetic data contradict the hypothesis of bisexual philopatry to natal site and suggest that these bottlenose dolphins are not unusual amongst mammals, with females being the more philopatric and males the more dispersing sex...
  24. ncbi request reprint Lonesome George is not alone among Galápagos tortoises
    Michael A Russello
    Curr Biol 17:R317-8. 2007