Mark I McCormick

Summary

Affiliation: James Cook University
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. pmc Coral decline threatens fish biodiversity in marine reserves
    Geoffrey P Jones
    School of Marine Biology and Aquaculture, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:8251-3. 2004
  2. pmc Survival against the odds: ontogenetic changes in selective pressure mediate growth-mortality trade-offs in a marine fish
    Monica Gagliano
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 274:1575-82. 2007
  3. pmc Ocean acidification reverses competition for space as habitats degrade
    Mark I McCormick
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    Sci Rep 3:3280. 2013
  4. pmc Lethal effects of habitat degradation on fishes through changing competitive advantage
    Mark I McCormick
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 279:3899-904. 2012
  5. pmc It pays to be pushy: intracohort interference competition between two reef fishes
    Mark I McCormick
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    PLoS ONE 7:e42590. 2012
  6. ncbi request reprint Influence of cortisol on developmental rhythms during embryogenesis in a tropical damselfish
    Mark I McCormick
    School of Marine Biology and Aquaculture, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    J Exp Zool 293:456-66. 2002
  7. pmc Behaviourally mediated phenotypic selection in a disturbed coral reef environment
    Mark I McCormick
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    PLoS ONE 4:e7096. 2009
  8. pmc Differing mechanisms underlie sexual size-dimorphism in two populations of a sex-changing fish
    Mark I McCormick
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    PLoS ONE 5:e10616. 2010
  9. ncbi request reprint Social facilitation of selective mortality
    Mark I McCormick
    School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Ecology 88:1562-70. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint Mothers matter: crowding leads to stressed mothers and smaller offspring in marine fish
    Mark I McCormick
    School of Marine Biology and Aquaculture, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    Ecology 87:1104-9. 2006

Detail Information

Publications47

  1. pmc Coral decline threatens fish biodiversity in marine reserves
    Geoffrey P Jones
    School of Marine Biology and Aquaculture, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:8251-3. 2004
    ..Several rare coral-specialists became locally extinct. We suggest that fish biodiversity is threatened wherever permanent reef degradation occurs and warn that marine reserves will not always be sufficient to ensure their survival...
  2. pmc Survival against the odds: ontogenetic changes in selective pressure mediate growth-mortality trade-offs in a marine fish
    Monica Gagliano
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 274:1575-82. 2007
    ..Ontogenetic changes in the shape of selectivity may be a mechanism maintaining phenotypic variation in growth rate and size within a population...
  3. pmc Ocean acidification reverses competition for space as habitats degrade
    Mark I McCormick
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    Sci Rep 3:3280. 2013
    ..Understanding these complex interactions will be crucial to predicting the likely composition of future communities under ocean acidification and climate change. ..
  4. pmc Lethal effects of habitat degradation on fishes through changing competitive advantage
    Mark I McCormick
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 279:3899-904. 2012
    ..Evidence from this study stresses the importance of changing interspecific interactions to community dynamics as habitats change...
  5. pmc It pays to be pushy: intracohort interference competition between two reef fishes
    Mark I McCormick
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    PLoS ONE 7:e42590. 2012
    ..The study highlights the importance of interaction dynamics between species within a recruitment cohort to patterns of growth and distribution of species within communities...
  6. ncbi request reprint Influence of cortisol on developmental rhythms during embryogenesis in a tropical damselfish
    Mark I McCormick
    School of Marine Biology and Aquaculture, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    J Exp Zool 293:456-66. 2002
    ..This study suggests that the maternal endowment of cortisol to eggs plays a vital role in determining the embryonic rhythms by which embryos grow and may be directly influencing metabolism...
  7. pmc Behaviourally mediated phenotypic selection in a disturbed coral reef environment
    Mark I McCormick
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    PLoS ONE 4:e7096. 2009
    ....
  8. pmc Differing mechanisms underlie sexual size-dimorphism in two populations of a sex-changing fish
    Mark I McCormick
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    PLoS ONE 5:e10616. 2010
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint Social facilitation of selective mortality
    Mark I McCormick
    School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Ecology 88:1562-70. 2007
    ..How this spatial and temporal patchiness in predator pressure interacts with spatial patchiness of recruiting prey will have a major influence on the resulting distribution of juveniles and their phenotypic traits...
  10. ncbi request reprint Mothers matter: crowding leads to stressed mothers and smaller offspring in marine fish
    Mark I McCormick
    School of Marine Biology and Aquaculture, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    Ecology 87:1104-9. 2006
    ..This social mechanism may influence which females effectively contribute to the next generation and may promote resilience in patchy or isolated populations...
  11. ncbi request reprint Consumption of coral propagules after mass spawning enhances larval quality of damselfish through maternal effects
    Mark I McCormick
    School of Marine Biology and Aquaculture, James Cook University, Qld 4811, Townsville, Australia
    Oecologia 136:37-45. 2003
    ..Evidence suggests that females gain a fitness advantage from feeding on coral spawn and that this is passed on to their offspring...
  12. pmc Ocean acidification affects prey detection by a predatory reef fish
    Ingrid L Cripps
    School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia
    PLoS ONE 6:e22736. 2011
    ..Thus, it is unlikely that the altered behaviour of predators is sufficient to fully compensate for the effects of ocean acidification on prey mortality...
  13. pmc Learn and live: predator experience and feeding history determines prey behaviour and survival
    Oona M Lonnstedt
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 279:2091-8. 2012
    ..This experiment highlights the importance of a flexible and rapid mechanism of learning the identity of predators for survival of young fish during the critical life-history transition between pelagic and benthic habitats...
  14. pmc Elevated CO2 affects predator-prey interactions through altered performance
    Bridie J M Allan
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    PLoS ONE 8:e58520. 2013
    ..This suggests that the dynamics of predator-prey interactions under future CO2 environments will depend on the extent to which the interacting species are affected and can adapt to the adverse effects of elevated CO2...
  15. ncbi request reprint Habitat choice, recruitment and the response of coral reef fishes to coral degradation
    David A Feary
    Australian Research Council, Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia
    Oecologia 153:727-37. 2007
    ..Our results suggest that while resistant to coral stress, coral death alters the process of replenishment of coral reef fish communities...
  16. doi request reprint Well-informed foraging: damage-released chemical cues of injured prey signal quality and size to predators
    Oona M Lonnstedt
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia
    Oecologia 168:651-8. 2012
    ..These results have implications for understanding predator foraging strategies and highlights that chemical cues play a complex role in predator-prey interactions in marine fish...
  17. pmc Ultimate predators: lionfish have evolved to circumvent prey risk assessment abilities
    Oona M Lonnstedt
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    PLoS ONE 8:e75781. 2013
    ..volitans. The cryptic nature of the red lionfish has enabled it to be destructive as a predator and a highly successful invasive species. ..
  18. pmc Learning temporal patterns of risk in a predator-diverse environment
    Yoland J Bosiger
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    PLoS ONE 7:e34535. 2012
    ..Our results provide the first experimental demonstration of a mechanism by which prey in a complex, multi-predator environment can learn and respond to daily patterns of predation risk...
  19. pmc Replenishment of fish populations is threatened by ocean acidification
    Philip L Munday
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:12930-4. 2010
    ..Our results show that additional CO(2) absorbed into the ocean will reduce recruitment success and have far-reaching consequences for the sustainability of fish populations...
  20. pmc Chemical alarm cues are conserved within the coral reef fish family Pomacentridae
    Matthew D Mitchell
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    PLoS ONE 7:e47428. 2012
    ..These findings demonstrate that chemical alarm cues are conserved within the pomacentrid family, providing juveniles with an innate recognition of heterospecific alarm cues as predicted by the phylogenetic relatedness hypothesis...
  21. pmc Metamorphosing reef fishes avoid predator scent when choosing a home
    Alexander L Vail
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    Biol Lett 7:921-4. 2011
    ..Transition-specific anti-predator adaptations, such as demonstrated here, may be widespread among organisms with complex life cycles and play an important role in prey population dynamics...
  22. pmc Sexual selection explains sex-specific growth plasticity and positive allometry for sexual size dimorphism in a reef fish
    Stefan P W Walker
    School of Marine and Tropical Biology, and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 276:3335-43. 2009
    ....
  23. ncbi request reprint Predators target rare prey in coral reef fish assemblages
    Glenn R Almany
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and School of Tropical and Marine Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, 4811, Australia
    Oecologia 152:751-61. 2007
    ....
  24. doi request reprint Hormonally mediated maternal effects shape offspring survival potential in stressful environments
    Monica Gagliano
    School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia
    Oecologia 160:657-65. 2009
    ..We propose that this immediate benefit outweighs the developmental costs which may be expressed as reduced fitness at later life stages...
  25. pmc Coral reef fish rapidly learn to identify multiple unknown predators upon recruitment to the reef
    Matthew D Mitchell
    Australia Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia
    PLoS ONE 6:e15764. 2011
    ..Upon entering an unfamiliar environment prey species are able to rapidly assess the risk of predation, enhancing their chances of survival, through the assessment of chemical stimuli...
  26. pmc A comparison of measures of boldness and their relationships to survival in young fish
    James R White
    School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    PLoS ONE 8:e68900. 2013
    ..Body size and distance ventured from shelter were the only variables that had a direct and positive relationship with survival. ..
  27. doi request reprint Increased CO2 stimulates reproduction in a coral reef fish
    Gabrielle M Miller
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, 4811, Australia
    Glob Chang Biol 19:3037-45. 2013
    ..However, any long-term consequences of increased reproductive effort on individuals or populations remain to be determined...
  28. pmc To fear or to feed: the effects of turbidity on perception of risk by a marine fish
    Susannah M Leahy
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville QLD, Australia
    Biol Lett 7:811-3. 2011
    ....
  29. ncbi request reprint Temperature-induced shifts in selective pressure at a critical developmental transition
    Monica Gagliano
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Oecologia 152:219-25. 2007
    ..Overall, our findings indicate that the outcome of selective mortality is strongly dependent on the interaction between environment conditions and intrinsic developmental schedules...
  30. ncbi request reprint Maternal condition influences phenotypic selection on offspring
    Monica Gagliano
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Marine Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    J Anim Ecol 76:174-82. 2007
    ..6. In summary, our results show that the maternal environment influences the relationship between offspring characteristics and survival and suggest that energy-driven selective mechanisms may operate to determine progeny viability...
  31. doi request reprint Friend or foe?: the role of latent inhibition in predator and non-predator labelling by coral reef fishes
    Matthew D Mitchell
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia
    Anim Cogn 14:707-14. 2011
    ..Our results highlight the ability of prey fish to continually update the information regarding the threat posed by other fishes in their vicinity...
  32. pmc Predator-induced changes in the growth of eyes and false eyespots
    Oona M Lonnstedt
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD4811, Australia
    Sci Rep 3:2259. 2013
    ..Damselfish exposed to predators had drastically higher survival suffering only 10% mortality while controls suffered 60% mortality 72 h after release...
  33. pmc Parental effects improve escape performance of juvenile reef fish in a high-CO2 world
    Bridie J M Allan
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia, CNR IAMC, Istituto per l Ambiente Marino Costiero, Localita Sa Mardini, Torregrande, Oristano, Italy
    Proc Biol Sci 281:20132179. 2014
    ..However, acclimation was not complete in some traits, and absent in others, suggesting that transgenerational acclimation does not completely compensate the effects of high CO2 on escape responses. ..
  34. pmc Marine mollusc predator-escape behaviour altered by near-future carbon dioxide levels
    Sue Ann Watson
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia, Programme for Physiology and Neurobiology, Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo 0316, Norway, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche Istituto per l Ambiente Marino Costiero, Torregrande, Oristano 09072, Italy
    Proc Biol Sci 281:20132377. 2014
    ..Altered behaviour of marine invertebrates at projected future CO2 levels could have potentially far-reaching implications for marine ecosystems. ..
  35. pmc Fish ears are sensitive to sex change
    Stefan P W Walker
    School of Marine and Tropical Biology, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4810, Australia
    Biol Lett 5:73-6. 2009
    ..It is possible that sex-changing fishes alter otolith composition, and thus sensory-range specificity, to optimize life history in accordance with their new reproductive mode...
  36. doi request reprint Impact of global warming and rising CO2 levels on coral reef fishes: what hope for the future?
    Philip L Munday
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    J Exp Biol 215:3865-73. 2012
    ..Ultimately, it will be the capacity for species to adjust to environmental change over coming decades that will determine the impact of climate change on marine ecosystems...
  37. doi request reprint Influence of prey body characteristics and performance on predator selection
    Thomas H Holmes
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Oecologia 159:401-13. 2009
    ....
  38. doi request reprint Density-dependent sex ratio adjustment and the allee effect: a model and a test using a sex-changing fish
    Stefan P W Walker
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    Am Nat 176:312-21. 2010
    ....
  39. doi request reprint Replenishment success linked to fluctuating asymmetry in larval fish
    Tove Lemberget
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, 4811, Australia
    Oecologia 159:83-93. 2009
    ..Although the generality of these results remain to be tested among other populations and species, otolith asymmetry may be an important indicator, and potentially a predictor, of larval quality and replenishment success...
  40. ncbi request reprint Suspended sediment prolongs larval development in a coral reef fish
    Amelia S Wenger
    School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    J Exp Biol 217:1122-8. 2014
    ..A sediment-induced extension of the pelagic larval stage could significantly reduce numbers of larvae competent to settle and, in turn, have major effects on adult population dynamics. ..
  41. pmc Syndromes or Flexibility: Behavior during a Life History Transition of a Coral Reef Fish
    James R White
    School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    PLoS ONE 8:e84262. 2013
    ....
  42. doi request reprint Determining trigger values of suspended sediment for behavioral changes in a coral reef fish
    Amelia S Wenger
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Mar Pollut Bull 70:73-80. 2013
    ..moluccensis may encounter sub-optimal conditions between 8% and 53% of the time. Changes in these vital processes may have long-term effects on the persistence of populations, particularly as habitat loss on coral reefs increases...
  43. pmc Degraded environments alter prey risk assessment
    Oona M Lonnstedt
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Ecol Evol 3:38-47. 2012
    ..These cues are critical for learning and avoiding predators, and a failure to respond can have dramatic repercussions for survival and recruitment...
  44. pmc Long-term cleaner fish presence affects growth of a coral reef fish
    Gillian E Clague
    The School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Saint Lucia, Queensland, Australia
    Biol Lett 7:863-5. 2011
    ..The effect of the removal of so few small fish on the size of another fish species is unprecedented on coral reefs...
  45. ncbi request reprint Selective predation for low body condition at the larval-juvenile transition of a coral reef fish
    Andrew S Hoey
    School of Marine Biology and Aquaculture, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Oecologia 139:23-9. 2004
    ..Traits developed in the larval phase can strongly influence the survival of individuals over this critical transition period for organisms with complex life cycles...
  46. pmc Reproductive acclimation to increased water temperature in a tropical reef fish
    Jennifer M Donelson
    School of the Environment, University of Technology, Sydney, Broadway, New South Wales, Australia School of Marine and Tropical Biology, and ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    PLoS ONE 9:e97223. 2014
    ..Our study suggests that understanding the acclimation capacity of reproductive performance will be critically important to predicting the impacts of climate change on biological systems. ..