Lee Berger

Summary

Affiliation: James Cook University
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Virulence of the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytium dendrobatidis varies with the strain
    Lee Berger
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 68:47-50. 2005
  2. doi request reprint Treatment of chytridiomycosis requires urgent clinical trials
    Lee Berger
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 92:165-74. 2010
  3. doi request reprint A zoospore inhibition technique to evaluate the activity of antifungal compounds against Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and unsuccessful treatment of experimentally infected green tree frogs (Litoria caerulea) by fluconazole and benzalkonium chloride
    Lee Berger
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Res Vet Sci 87:106-10. 2009
  4. ncbi request reprint Life cycle stages of the amphibian chytrid Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis
    Lee Berger
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 68:51-63. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Distribution of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and pathology in the skin of green tree frogs Litoria caerulea with severe chytridiomycosis
    Lee Berger
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 68:65-70. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Severe sparganosis in Australian tree frogs
    Lee Berger
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    J Wildl Dis 45:921-9. 2009
  7. doi request reprint Application of the survey protocol for chytridiomycosis to Queensland, Australia
    Lee F Skerratt
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 92:117-29. 2010
  8. doi request reprint Pathogenesis of chytridiomycosis, a cause of catastrophic amphibian declines
    Jamie Voyles
    School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Science 326:582-5. 2009
  9. ncbi request reprint Electrolyte depletion and osmotic imbalance in amphibians with chytridiomycosis
    Jamie Voyles
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 77:113-8. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint Chloramphenicol with fluid and electrolyte therapy cures terminally ill green tree frogs (Litoria caerulea) with chytridiomycosis
    Sam Young
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    J Zoo Wildl Med 43:330-7. 2012

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications27

  1. ncbi request reprint Virulence of the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytium dendrobatidis varies with the strain
    Lee Berger
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 68:47-50. 2005
    ..A standard naming scheme for isolates of B. dendrobatidis is proposed...
  2. doi request reprint Treatment of chytridiomycosis requires urgent clinical trials
    Lee Berger
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 92:165-74. 2010
    ..Priorities are to validate and optimize the use of heat and itraconazole regimes...
  3. doi request reprint A zoospore inhibition technique to evaluate the activity of antifungal compounds against Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and unsuccessful treatment of experimentally infected green tree frogs (Litoria caerulea) by fluconazole and benzalkonium chloride
    Lee Berger
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Res Vet Sci 87:106-10. 2009
    ..Although these treatments resulted in longer survival times (mean 43.7+/-11.3 days) than in the untreated controls (37.9+/-9.3 days), the mortality rate was still 100%. Higher doses of fluconazole are suggested for further animal trials...
  4. ncbi request reprint Life cycle stages of the amphibian chytrid Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis
    Lee Berger
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 68:51-63. 2005
    ..Hyperkeratosis may be due to (1) a hyperplastic response that leads to an increased turnover of epidermal cells, and (2) premature keratinization and death of infected cells...
  5. ncbi request reprint Distribution of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and pathology in the skin of green tree frogs Litoria caerulea with severe chytridiomycosis
    Lee Berger
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 68:65-70. 2005
    ..In some frogs, ulceration and erosions occurred on skin on the back in the absence of sporangia. Other pathological changes such as hyperkeratosis and congestion occurred much more frequently on ventral surfaces...
  6. ncbi request reprint Severe sparganosis in Australian tree frogs
    Lee Berger
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    J Wildl Dis 45:921-9. 2009
    ..Concurrent infections were common. Our findings suggest sparganosis is one of a few currently recognized serious diseases affecting free-ranging frogs in Australia...
  7. doi request reprint Application of the survey protocol for chytridiomycosis to Queensland, Australia
    Lee F Skerratt
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 92:117-29. 2010
    ..Given that the survey protocol has been applied successfully in Australia it may be useful for mapping the distribution of Bd in other parts of the world...
  8. doi request reprint Pathogenesis of chytridiomycosis, a cause of catastrophic amphibian declines
    Jamie Voyles
    School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Science 326:582-5. 2009
    ..Because the skin is critical in maintaining amphibian homeostasis, disruption to cutaneous function may be the mechanism by which Bd produces morbidity and mortality across a wide range of phylogenetically distant amphibian taxa...
  9. ncbi request reprint Electrolyte depletion and osmotic imbalance in amphibians with chytridiomycosis
    Jamie Voyles
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 77:113-8. 2007
    ..dendrobatidis. Understanding the mechanisms of mortality may also explain interspecific variation in susceptibility to chytridiomycosis...
  10. ncbi request reprint Chloramphenicol with fluid and electrolyte therapy cures terminally ill green tree frogs (Litoria caerulea) with chytridiomycosis
    Sam Young
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    J Zoo Wildl Med 43:330-7. 2012
    ..caerulea were cured within 28 days by continuous shallow immersion in 20 mg/L chloramphenicol solution without adverse effects. This is the first known report of a clinical treatment protocol for curing terminally ill Bd-infected frogs...
  11. doi request reprint Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis: requirement for further isolate collection and archiving
    Jamie Voyles
    School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 92:109-12. 2010
    ..We suggest the creation of a centralized database of isolate information, and we urge researchers and managers to isolate and archive Bd to facilitate future research on chytridiomycosis...
  12. doi request reprint Using community surveillance data to differentiate between emerging and endemic amphibian diseases
    Sam Young
    School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 98:1-10. 2012
    ....
  13. doi request reprint Survey protocol for detecting chytridiomycosis in all Australian frog populations
    Lee F Skerratt
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 80:85-94. 2008
    ..This protocol can be adapted for use in other countries and a standard protocol will enable comparison among amphibian populations globally...
  14. doi request reprint Survival of the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis on bare hands and gloves: hygiene implications for amphibian handling
    Diana Mendez
    Amphibian Diseases Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 82:97-104. 2008
    ....
  15. pmc Prior infection does not improve survival against the amphibian disease Chytridiomycosis
    Scott D Cashins
    James Cook University, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    PLoS ONE 8:e56747. 2013
    ..However, survival of some individuals from all experimental groups indicates existence of protective innate immunity. Understanding and promoting this innate resistance holds potential for enabling species recovery...
  16. pmc Temperature alters reproductive life history patterns in Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a lethal pathogen associated with the global loss of amphibians
    Jamie Voyles
    Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California Berkeley Berkeley, California, 94720 3144, USA School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, James Cook University Townsville, Queensland, 4811, Australia
    Ecol Evol 2:2241-9. 2012
    ..We also suggest that the adaptive responses of Bd to thermal conditions warrant further investigation, especially in the face of global climate change...
  17. doi request reprint Polymorphic repetitive loci of the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis
    Stephen Garland
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 97:1-9. 2011
    ..In addition, we found that repetitive loci in Bd include possible orthologs of virulence-related genes from pathogenic fungi...
  18. ncbi request reprint Fluorosis as a probable factor in metabolic bone disease in captive New Zealand native frogs (Leiopelma species)
    Stephanie D Shaw
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, Anton Breinl Centre, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Angus Smith Drive, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    J Zoo Wildl Med 43:549-65. 2012
    ..Addressing these three factors at Auckland Zoo reduced morbidity, bone fractures, and mortality rates...
  19. doi request reprint Controlling wildlife fungal disease spread: in vitro efficacy of disinfectants against Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and Mucor amphibiorum
    Rebecca Webb
    Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 99:119-25. 2012
    ..Current protocols against Pc that involve high concentrations (10%) of Phytoclean are likely to reduce spread of pathogenic wildlife fungi, which is important for protecting biodiversity...
  20. doi request reprint Interactions between Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and its amphibian hosts: a review of pathogenesis and immunity
    Jamie Voyles
    School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Microbes Infect 13:25-32. 2011
    ..This review provides a summary of host characteristics, pathogen characteristics and host-pathogen responses to infection that are important for understanding disease development...
  21. ncbi request reprint MS-222 (tricaine methane sulfonate) does not kill the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis
    Rebecca Webb
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 68:89-90. 2005
    ..Exposure to 2 g l(-1) MS-222 for 1 h does not kill B. dendrobatidis cultures, suggesting that MS-222 is safe to use in chytridiomycosis studies...
  22. doi request reprint Hematologic and plasma biochemical reference intervals for health monitoring of wild Australian tree frogs
    Sam Young
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia
    Vet Clin Pathol 41:478-92. 2012
    ..Reference values would aid in early detection of emerging infectious diseases, which are a significant problem for amphibian conservation efforts...
  23. doi request reprint Experimental infection of self-cured Leiopelma archeyi with the amphibian chytrid Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis
    Stephanie D Shaw
    Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 92:159-63. 2010
    ..Our results show that L. archeyi that have self cured have resistance to chytridiomycosis when exposed. The pattern is consistent with innate or acquired immunity to Bd, and immunological studies are needed to confirm this...
  24. pmc Variation in Thermal Performance of a Widespread Pathogen, the Amphibian Chytrid Fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis
    Lisa A Stevenson
    School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    PLoS ONE 8:e73830. 2013
    ....
  25. ncbi request reprint Fungicidal effects of chemical disinfectants, UV light, desiccation and heat on the amphibian chytrid Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis
    Megan L Johnson
    School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4810, Australia
    Dis Aquat Organ 57:255-60. 2003
    ..UV light (at 1000 mW m(-2) with a wavelength of 254 nm) was ineffective at killing B. dendrobatidis in culture...
  26. ncbi request reprint Multilocus sequence typing suggests the chytrid pathogen of amphibians is a recently emerged clone
    Erica A Morehouse
    Department of Biology, Biological Sciences Building, Room 139, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Mol Ecol 12:395-403. 2003
    ..dendrobatidis is diploid and primarily reproduces clonally. In contrast to the lack of nucleotide polymorphism, electrophoretic karyotyping of multiple strains demonstrated a number of chromosome length polymorphisms...
  27. ncbi request reprint Production of polyclonal antibodies to Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and their use in an immunoperoxidase test for chytridiomycosis in amphibians
    Lee Berger
    Australian Animal Health Laboratory, CSIRO Livestock Industries, Geelong, Victoria
    Dis Aquat Organ 48:213-20. 2002
    ..dendrobatidis that infect frogs. The immunoperoxidase stain is a useful screening test when combined with recognition of the morphology and infection site of B. dendrobatidis...