D R Bellwood

Summary

Affiliation: James Cook University
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Biodiversity hotspots: evolutionary origins of biodiversity in wrasses (Halichoeres: Labridae) in the Indo-Pacific and new world tropics
    Paul H Barber
    Department of Biology, Boston University Marine Program, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 35:235-53. 2005
  2. ncbi request reprint Community structure of corals and reef fishes at multiple scales
    Sean R Connolly
    Centre for Coral Reef Biodiversity, Department of Marine Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Science 309:1363-5. 2005
  3. doi request reprint Dating the evolutionary origins of wrasse lineages (Labridae) and the rise of trophic novelty on coral reefs
    Peter F Cowman
    School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 52:621-31. 2009
  4. doi request reprint Suppression of herbivory by macroalgal density: a critical feedback on coral reefs?
    Andrew S Hoey
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Ecol Lett 14:267-73. 2011
  5. doi request reprint Coral recovery may not herald the return of fishes on damaged coral reefs
    David R Bellwood
    School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia
    Oecologia 170:567-73. 2012
  6. pmc Human activity selectively impacts the ecosystem roles of parrotfishes on coral reefs
    David R Bellwood
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 279:1621-9. 2012
  7. ncbi request reprint Regional-scale assembly rules and biodiversity of coral reefs
    D R Bellwood
    Centre for Coral Reef Biodiversity, Department of Marine Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Science 292:1532-5. 2001
  8. doi request reprint Evolutionary history of the butterflyfishes (f: Chaetodontidae) and the rise of coral feeding fishes
    D R Bellwood
    School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia
    J Evol Biol 23:335-49. 2010
  9. ncbi request reprint Sleeping functional group drives coral-reef recovery
    David R Bellwood
    Australian Research Council, Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Curr Biol 16:2434-9. 2006
  10. pmc Functional versatility supports coral reef biodiversity
    D R Bellwood
    Department of Marine Biology, Centre for Coral Reef Biodiversity, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 273:101-7. 2006

Detail Information

Publications29

  1. ncbi request reprint Biodiversity hotspots: evolutionary origins of biodiversity in wrasses (Halichoeres: Labridae) in the Indo-Pacific and new world tropics
    Paul H Barber
    Department of Biology, Boston University Marine Program, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 35:235-53. 2005
    ..Results suggest plueralistic origins of biodiversity, but that vast amounts of habitat may favor the survival of biodiversity in the IAA biodiversity hotspot...
  2. ncbi request reprint Community structure of corals and reef fishes at multiple scales
    Sean R Connolly
    Centre for Coral Reef Biodiversity, Department of Marine Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Science 309:1363-5. 2005
    ..Our findings underscore the importance of robust conservation strategies that are appropriately scaled to the broad suite of environmental processes that help sustain biodiversity...
  3. doi request reprint Dating the evolutionary origins of wrasse lineages (Labridae) and the rise of trophic novelty on coral reefs
    Peter F Cowman
    School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 52:621-31. 2009
    ..The current trophic diversity of the Labridae is a result of the accumulation of feeding modes dating back to the K/T boundary at 65 Ma, with all major feeding modes on present day reefs already in place 7.5 million years ago...
  4. doi request reprint Suppression of herbivory by macroalgal density: a critical feedback on coral reefs?
    Andrew S Hoey
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Ecol Lett 14:267-73. 2011
    ..This behaviour may provide a positive feedback leading to the growth and persistence of macroalgal stands; increasing the stability of phase shifts to macroalgae...
  5. doi request reprint Coral recovery may not herald the return of fishes on damaged coral reefs
    David R Bellwood
    School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia
    Oecologia 170:567-73. 2012
    ....
  6. pmc Human activity selectively impacts the ecosystem roles of parrotfishes on coral reefs
    David R Bellwood
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 279:1621-9. 2012
    ..The depletion of fishes causes differential decline of key ecosystem functions, radically changing the dynamics of coral reefs and setting the stage for future ecological surprises...
  7. ncbi request reprint Regional-scale assembly rules and biodiversity of coral reefs
    D R Bellwood
    Centre for Coral Reef Biodiversity, Department of Marine Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Science 292:1532-5. 2001
    ..Low-diversity regions are most vulnerable to human impacts such as global warming, underscoring the urgent need for integrated management at multinational scales...
  8. doi request reprint Evolutionary history of the butterflyfishes (f: Chaetodontidae) and the rise of coral feeding fishes
    D R Bellwood
    School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia
    J Evol Biol 23:335-49. 2010
    ..This historical association underpins the sensitivity of specific butterflyfish clades to global coral decline...
  9. ncbi request reprint Sleeping functional group drives coral-reef recovery
    David R Bellwood
    Australian Research Council, Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Curr Biol 16:2434-9. 2006
    ..Nevertheless, reversal is possible. The critical issue is to identify and protect those groups that underpin the resilience and regeneration of complex ecosystems...
  10. pmc Functional versatility supports coral reef biodiversity
    D R Bellwood
    Department of Marine Biology, Centre for Coral Reef Biodiversity, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 273:101-7. 2006
    ..Such trophic versatility may lay the foundation for both the origins and maintenance of high biodiversity on coral reefs...
  11. ncbi request reprint Evolution and biogeography of marine angelfishes (Pisces: Pomacanthidae)
    David R Bellwood
    Centre for Coral Reef Biodiversity, Department of Marine Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 33:140-55. 2004
    ..Within the family, ecological diversity and species-level diversification are restricted primarily to a single pygmy angelfish clade with an origin near the Oligocene-Miocene boundary...
  12. ncbi request reprint Confronting the coral reef crisis
    D R Bellwood
    Centre for Coral Reef Biodiversity, Dept of Marine Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Nature 429:827-33. 2004
    ..These findings have profound implications for restoration of degraded reefs, management of fisheries, and the focus on marine protected areas and biodiversity hotspots as priorities for conservation...
  13. ncbi request reprint Climate change, human impacts, and the resilience of coral reefs
    T P Hughes
    Centre for Coral Reef Biodiversity, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Science 301:929-33. 2003
    ..International integration of management strategies that support reef resilience need to be vigorously implemented, and complemented by strong policy decisions to reduce the rate of global warming...
  14. doi request reprint Coral reefs as drivers of cladogenesis: expanding coral reefs, cryptic extinction events, and the development of biodiversity hotspots
    P F Cowman
    School of Marine and Tropical Biology, and Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia
    J Evol Biol 24:2543-62. 2011
    ..The IAA appears to support both cladogenesis and survival in associated lineages, laying the foundation for the recent IAA marine biodiversity hotspot...
  15. pmc Wave energy and swimming performance shape coral reef fish assemblages
    C J Fulton
    Centre for Coral Reef Biodiversity, Department of Marine Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 272:827-32. 2005
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Extremes, plasticity, and invariance in vertebrate life history traits: insights from coral reef fishes
    Martial Depczynski
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Marine Biology, James Cook University, Townsville 4811, Australia
    Ecology 87:3119-27. 2006
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint Life history patterns shape energy allocation among fishes on coral reefs
    Martial Depczynski
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Marine Biology, James Cook University, Townsville 4811, Australia
    Oecologia 153:111-20. 2007
    ..It appears that life histories leave a strong imprint on ecosystem energy fluxes and illustrate the importance of incorporating taxon-specific features when assigning values to key ecosystem processes...
  18. ncbi request reprint Testing species abundance models: a new bootstrap approach applied to Indo-Pacific coral reefs
    Sean R Connolly
    School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia
    Ecology 90:3138-49. 2009
    ..Such individual-based tests therefore may be able to identify lack of model fit where previous tests have been inconclusive...
  19. ncbi request reprint Ancient origins of Indo-Pacific coral reef fish biodiversity: a case study of the leopard wrasses (Labridae: Macropharyngodon)
    Charmaine I Read
    Centre for Coral Reef Biodiversity, Department of Marine Biology, The School of Marine Biology and Aquaculture, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 38:808-19. 2006
    ....
  20. ncbi request reprint Prey-capture in Pomacanthus semicirculatus (Teleostei, Pomacanthidae): functional implications of intramandibular joints in marine angelfishes
    Nicolai Konow
    Centre for Coral Reef Biodiversity, Department of Marine Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    J Exp Biol 208:1421-33. 2005
    ..The structural and functional modifications in the Pomacanthus feeding apparatus are matched to an unusual diet of structurally resilient and firmly attached benthic prey...
  21. ncbi request reprint Phase shifts, herbivory, and the resilience of coral reefs to climate change
    Terence P Hughes
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville QLD 4811, Australia
    Curr Biol 17:360-5. 2007
    ....
  22. doi request reprint Pair formation in the herbivorous rabbitfish Siganus doliatus
    S J Brandl
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia
    J Fish Biol 82:2031-44. 2013
    ..doliatus is driven, in part, by other, non-reproductive, ecological factors. It is suggested that pair formation allows for increased vigilance against predation and enables S. doliatus to execute a novel feeding behaviour...
  23. ncbi request reprint No-take areas, herbivory and coral reef resilience
    Terry P Hughes
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Trends Ecol Evol 22:1-3. 2007
    ..No-take areas, where fishing is prohibited, are vital tools for managing food webs, ecosystem function and the resilience of reefs, in a seascape setting that extends far beyond the boundaries of the reefs themselves...
  24. ncbi request reprint Hybridization in coral reef fishes: introgression and bi-directional gene exchange in Thalassoma (family Labridae)
    Siti M Yaakub
    School of Marine Biology and Aquaculture, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 40:84-100. 2006
    ..quinquevittatum outnumbering T. jansenii by approximately 25:1. In this case study, hybridization appears to be driven by ecological rather than evolutionary factors...
  25. ncbi request reprint Shortest recorded vertebrate lifespan found in a coral reef fish
    Martial Depczynski
    Centre for Coral Reef Biodiversity, Department of Marine Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
    Curr Biol 15:R288-9. 2005
  26. ncbi request reprint The contribution of small individuals to density-body size relationships
    John L Ackerman
    Department of Marine Biology, James Cook University, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Oecologia 136:137-40. 2003
    ..Our linear relationship may be a consequence of the larger differences in body size among taxa. Spanning over five orders of magnitude, the range of body sizes appears to be an important factor in shaping density-body size relationships...
  27. ncbi request reprint The contribution of small individuals to density-body size relationships: examination of energetic equivalence in reef fishes
    John L Ackerman
    Marine and Freshwater Systems, Department of Primary Industries, Queenscliff, Victoria, 3225, Australia
    Oecologia 139:568-71. 2004
    ..75. Unlike plants and intermediate to large reef fishes, the smallest fishes appear to have constraints that may reflect different patterns of resource acquisition...
  28. pmc Local phylogenetic divergence and global evolutionary convergence of skull function in reef fishes of the family Labridae
    Mark W Westneat
    Department of Zoology, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL 60605, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 272:993-1000. 2005
    ..Divergence of close relatives, convergence among higher clades and several unusual 'breakthroughs' in skull function characterize the evolution of functional complexity in one of the most diverse groups of reef fishes...
  29. ncbi request reprint Coral reef biodiversity and conservation
    Andrew H Baird
    Science 296:1026-8; author reply 1026-8. 2002