C R Parish

Summary

Affiliation: Australian National University
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Dependence of the adaptive immune response on innate immunity: some questions answered but new paradoxes emerge
    C R Parish
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    Immunol Cell Biol 75:523-7. 1997
  2. ncbi request reprint Fluorescent dyes for lymphocyte migration and proliferation studies
    C R Parish
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
    Immunol Cell Biol 77:499-508. 1999
  3. doi request reprint Unexpected new roles for heparanase in Type 1 diabetes and immune gene regulation
    C R Parish
    Department of Immunology, The John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
    Matrix Biol 32:228-33. 2013
  4. ncbi request reprint Identification of sulfated oligosaccharide-based inhibitors of tumor growth and metastasis using novel in vitro assays for angiogenesis and heparanase activity
    C R Parish
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra
    Cancer Res 59:3433-41. 1999
  5. ncbi request reprint Cancer immunotherapy: the past, the present and the future
    Christopher R Parish
    Division of Immunology and Genetics, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    Immunol Cell Biol 81:106-13. 2003
  6. ncbi request reprint Treatment of central nervous system inflammation with inhibitors of basement membrane degradation
    C R Parish
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
    Immunol Cell Biol 76:104-13. 1998
  7. ncbi request reprint The role of heparan sulphate in inflammation
    Christopher R Parish
    Division of Immunology and Genetics, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
    Nat Rev Immunol 6:633-43. 2006
  8. pmc Human platelet heparanase: purification, characterization and catalytic activity
    C Freeman
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT2601, Australia
    Biochem J 330:1341-50. 1998
  9. ncbi request reprint Histidine-rich glycoprotein regulates the binding of monomeric IgG and immune complexes to monocytes
    N N Gorgani
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, The John Curtin School of Medical Research, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    Int Immunol 11:1275-82. 1999
  10. ncbi request reprint Histidine-rich glycoprotein and platelet factor 4 mask heparan sulfate proteoglycans recognized by acidic and basic fibroblast growth factor
    K J Brown
    Division of Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra
    Biochemistry 33:13918-27. 1994

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications52

  1. ncbi request reprint Dependence of the adaptive immune response on innate immunity: some questions answered but new paradoxes emerge
    C R Parish
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory
    Immunol Cell Biol 75:523-7. 1997
    ..Finally, we argue that the two paradoxes, rather than undermining the new model of immunity, highlight our lack of understanding of key elements of the vertebrate immune system...
  2. ncbi request reprint Fluorescent dyes for lymphocyte migration and proliferation studies
    C R Parish
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
    Immunol Cell Biol 77:499-508. 1999
    ..In the future it is highly likely that additional fluorescent dyes, with different spectral properties to CFSE, will become available, as well as membrane inserting fluorescent dyes that more homogeneously label lymphocytes than PKH26...
  3. doi request reprint Unexpected new roles for heparanase in Type 1 diabetes and immune gene regulation
    C R Parish
    Department of Immunology, The John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
    Matrix Biol 32:228-33. 2013
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Identification of sulfated oligosaccharide-based inhibitors of tumor growth and metastasis using novel in vitro assays for angiogenesis and heparanase activity
    C R Parish
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra
    Cancer Res 59:3433-41. 1999
    ..Acute hematogenous metastasis assays also demonstrated that PI-88 was a potent (>90%) inhibitor of blood-borne metastasis. Thus, by the use of novel in vitro screening procedures, we have identified a promising antitumor agent...
  5. ncbi request reprint Cancer immunotherapy: the past, the present and the future
    Christopher R Parish
    Division of Immunology and Genetics, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    Immunol Cell Biol 81:106-13. 2003
    ..Alternative strategies include recruiting tumouricidal myeloid cells into tumours, generating antiangiogenic immune responses and directing innate immunity to hypoxia-induced ligands on tumour cells...
  6. ncbi request reprint Treatment of central nervous system inflammation with inhibitors of basement membrane degradation
    C R Parish
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
    Immunol Cell Biol 76:104-13. 1998
    ..It is hoped that future work will result in the development of a totally new class of highly effective, subtle and non-toxic anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of MS and other inflammatory diseases...
  7. ncbi request reprint The role of heparan sulphate in inflammation
    Christopher R Parish
    Division of Immunology and Genetics, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
    Nat Rev Immunol 6:633-43. 2006
    ....
  8. pmc Human platelet heparanase: purification, characterization and catalytic activity
    C Freeman
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT2601, Australia
    Biochem J 330:1341-50. 1998
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint Histidine-rich glycoprotein regulates the binding of monomeric IgG and immune complexes to monocytes
    N N Gorgani
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, The John Curtin School of Medical Research, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    Int Immunol 11:1275-82. 1999
    ..Thus HRG can interact with FcgammaRI on monocytes and block monomeric IgG binding, whereas when incorporated in IgG containing IC, HRG can enhance the uptake of IC by monocytes, probably via its heparan sulfate binding domain...
  10. ncbi request reprint Histidine-rich glycoprotein and platelet factor 4 mask heparan sulfate proteoglycans recognized by acidic and basic fibroblast growth factor
    K J Brown
    Division of Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra
    Biochemistry 33:13918-27. 1994
    ..Alternatively, they could act as negative regulators by masking HSPGs on responsive cells and preventing FGF receptor activation...
  11. ncbi request reprint Isolation, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of a novel testis-specific human four-transmembrane gene related to CD20 and FcepsilonRI-beta
    M D Hulett
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, ANU, P O Box 344, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
    Biochem Biophys Res Commun 280:374-9. 2001
    ..TETM4 is the first nonhematopoietic member of the CD20/FcepsilonRIbeta family, and like its hematopoietic-specific relatives, it may be involved in signal transduction as a component of a multimeric receptor complex...
  12. ncbi request reprint Cell surface expression of the 300 kDa mannose-6-phosphate receptor by activated T lymphocytes
    E J Hindmarsh
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
    Immunol Cell Biol 79:436-43. 2001
    ..Such findings are consistent with the hypothesis that cell surface MPR-300 is required for the entry of T cells into inflammatory sites...
  13. ncbi request reprint Identification of active-site residues of the pro-metastatic endoglycosidase heparanase
    M D Hulett
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, P O Box 334, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia
    Biochemistry 39:15659-67. 2000
    ..These data suggest that heparanase is a member of the clan A glycosyl hydrolases and has a common catalytic mechanism that involves two conserved acidic residues, a putative proton donor at Glu(225) and a nucleophile at Glu(343)...
  14. ncbi request reprint Murine histidine-rich glycoprotein: cloning, characterization and cellular origin
    M D Hulett
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, The John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
    Immunol Cell Biol 78:280-7. 2000
    ..These data suggest that HRG expression by immune cells is due to the acquisition of plasma HRG derived from the liver. Finally, genomic Southern blot analysis of the mouse HRG gene suggests that it is a single copy gene...
  15. ncbi request reprint Differential binding of histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) to human IgG subclasses and IgG molecules containing kappa and lambda light chains
    N N Gorgani
    Division of Immunology, The John Curtin School of Medical Research, Faculty of Science, Canberra, Australia
    J Biol Chem 274:29633-40. 1999
    ....
  16. pmc Evidence that platelet and tumour heparanases are similar enzymes
    C Freeman
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, 2601, Australia
    Biochem J 342:361-8. 1999
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint Cloning of mammalian heparanase, an important enzyme in tumor invasion and metastasis
    M D Hulett
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, ANU, Canberra, ACT, Australia
    Nat Med 5:803-9. 1999
    ..Exhaustive studies have shown only one heparanase sequence, consistent with the idea that this enzyme is the dominant endoglucuronidase in mammalian tissues...
  18. ncbi request reprint Histidine-rich glycoprotein binds to cell-surface heparan sulfate via its N-terminal domain following Zn2+ chelation
    Allison L Jones
    Cancer and Vascular Biology Group, Division of Immunology and Genetics, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 2601, Australia
    J Biol Chem 279:30114-22. 2004
    ..Based on these data, we propose that the N1N2 domain binds to cell-surface heparan sulfate and that the interaction of Zn2+ with the HRR can indirectly enhance cell-surface binding...
  19. ncbi request reprint Detection of low-affinity adhesion ligands by linking recombinant cell adhesion molecules in uniform orientation to a fluorescently labelled dextran molecule by means of hexahistidine tagging: the case of multimeric CD40
    G Vassiliou
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT
    J Immunol Methods 215:9-15. 1998
    ..The uniform orientation of the molecules on the dextran is an advantage over previous systems and permits the preparation of heterogeneous, multimeric ligands which more closely mimic the conditions at the cell surface...
  20. ncbi request reprint Targeting dendritic cells with antigen-containing liposomes: antitumour immunity
    Joseph G Altin
    The Australian National University, School of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Science, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    Expert Opin Biol Ther 4:1735-47. 2004
    ..Liposomal targeting of antigen and maturation signals directly to DCs in vivo, therefore, represents a much simpler strategy for cancer immunotherapy than antigen loading DCs ex vivo...
  21. ncbi request reprint C8c-C15 monoseco-analogues of the phenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids julandine and cryptopleurine exhibiting potent anti-angiogenic properties
    Martin G Banwell
    Research School of Chemistry, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, Australia
    Bioorg Med Chem Lett 16:181-5. 2006
    ..These analogues show dramatically reduced cytotoxicity compared with the parent system 2 but they are, nevertheless, potent anti-angiogenic agents...
  22. doi request reprint Dramatic regulation of heparanase activity and angiogenesis gene expression in synovium from patients with rheumatoid arthritis
    Rachel W Li
    Australian National University, and Canberra Hospital, Canberra, ACT, Australia
    Arthritis Rheum 58:1590-600. 2008
    ..In this study, we assessed heparanase activity in synovial fluid (SF) and synovial tissue (ST) from patients with RA or osteoarthritis (OA), and analyzed the expression of angiogenic pathway-focused genes in ST from RA and OA patients...
  23. ncbi request reprint Liposomal vaccines--targeting the delivery of antigen
    Joseph G Altin
    School of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Science, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    Methods 40:39-52. 2006
    ....
  24. ncbi request reprint Convergent synthesis and preliminary biological evaluations of the stilbenolignan (+/-)-aiphanol and various congeners
    Martin G Banwell
    Research School of Chemistry, Institute of Advanced Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    Org Biomol Chem 1:2427-9. 2003
    ..2:1:2:1 mixture of the stilbenolignan (+/-)-aiphanol (1) and congeners 2-4 each of which show significant anti-angiogenic and COX-2 inhibitory properties...
  25. ncbi request reprint Evidence that the cellular ligand for the human NK cell activation receptor NKp30 is not a heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan
    Hilary S Warren
    Division of Immunology and Genetics, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
    J Immunol 175:207-12. 2005
    ..From these results we conclude that HS GAG are not ligands for NKp30, leaving open the question as to the nature of the cellular ligand for this important NK cell activation receptor...
  26. ncbi request reprint Th2-mediated anti-tumour immunity: friend or foe?
    J I Ellyard
    Cancer and Vascular Biology Group, Division of Immunology and Genetics, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra City, ACT 2601, Australia
    Tissue Antigens 70:1-11. 2007
    ..Collectively, from this analysis, we conclude that there is a great potential for the development of Th2-mediated immunotherapies that harness the cytotoxic activity of eosinophils...
  27. doi request reprint Interplay between chromatin remodeling and epigenetic changes during lineage-specific commitment to granzyme B expression
    Torsten Juelich
    Division of Immunology and Genetics, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    J Immunol 183:7063-72. 2009
    ..These data suggest that for high levels of transcription to occur a distinct set of histone modifications needs to be established in addition to histone loss at the proximal promoter of gzmB...
  28. ncbi request reprint Targeting dendritic cells with antigen-containing liposomes: a highly effective procedure for induction of antitumor immunity and for tumor immunotherapy
    Christina L van Broekhoven
    School of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Science, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
    Cancer Res 64:4357-65. 2004
    ..The results show that the targeting of antigen to DCs in this way is highly effective at inducing immunity and protection against the tumor, with protection being at least partially dependent on the eosinophil chemokine eotaxin...
  29. doi request reprint Molecular mechanisms of late apoptotic/necrotic cell clearance
    I K H Poon
    John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, 2601, Australia
    Cell Death Differ 17:381-97. 2010
    ..This review provides an overview of the molecular mechanisms and the immunological outcomes of late apoptotic/necrotic cell removal and highlights the striking similarities between late apoptotic/necrotic cell and pathogen clearance...
  30. ncbi request reprint Histidine-rich glycoprotein: A novel adaptor protein in plasma that modulates the immune, vascular and coagulation systems
    Allison L Jones
    Cancer and Vascular Biology Group, Division of Immunology and Genetics, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
    Immunol Cell Biol 83:106-18. 2005
    ..This review outlines the molecular, structural, biological and clinical properties of HRG as well as describing the role of HRG in various physiological processes...
  31. pmc Continual low-level activation of the classical complement pathway
    A P Manderson
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia
    J Exp Med 194:747-56. 2001
    ..This antigen-independent mechanism for classical pathway activation may augment activation of the complement system at sites of inflammation and infarction...
  32. ncbi request reprint Histidine-rich glycoprotein binds to human IgG and C1q and inhibits the formation of insoluble immune complexes
    N N Gorgani
    Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, The John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT
    Biochemistry 36:6653-62. 1997
    ..The results show that human HRG binds to C1q and to IgG in a Zn2+-modulated fashion, and that HRG can regulate the formation of IIC in vitro, thus indicating a new functional role for HRG in vivo...
  33. pmc Dynamic histone variant exchange accompanies gene induction in T cells
    Elissa L Sutcliffe
    Division of Immunology and Genetics, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
    Mol Cell Biol 29:1972-86. 2009
    ..From these observations, we propose that H3.3 deposition may both facilitate chromatin accessibility increases by destabilizing nucleosomes and compete with recruited histone modifiers to alter PTM patterns upon gene induction...
  34. doi request reprint Regulation of histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) function via plasmin-mediated proteolytic cleavage
    Ivan K H Poon
    The John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
    Biochem J 424:27-37. 2009
    ..Thus proteolytic cleavage of HRG by plasmin may provide a feedback mechanism to regulate the effects of HRG on the plasminogen/plasmin system and other functions of HRG...
  35. doi request reprint Histidine-rich glycoprotein is a novel plasma pattern recognition molecule that recruits IgG to facilitate necrotic cell clearance via FcgammaRI on phagocytes
    Ivan K H Poon
    The John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    Blood 115:2473-82. 2010
    ..Thus, HRG has the unique property of complexing with IgG and facilitating a proinflammatory innate immune response to promote the clearance of necrotic cells...
  36. ncbi request reprint Eotaxin selectively binds heparin. An interaction that protects eotaxin from proteolysis and potentiates chemotactic activity in vivo
    Julia I Ellyard
    Cancer and Vascular Biology Group, Division of Immunology and Genetics, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Building 54, Garran Road, Acton, Australian Capital Territory 0200, Australia
    J Biol Chem 282:15238-47. 2007
    ..These results suggest a role for mast cell-derived heparin in the recruitment of eosinophils, reinforcing Th2 polarization of inflammatory responses...
  37. ncbi request reprint Regulation of carcinogenesis by IL-5 and CCL11: a potential role for eosinophils in tumor immune surveillance
    Ljubov Simson
    Division of Immunology and Genetics, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Mills Road Acton, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
    J Immunol 178:4222-9. 2007
    ..In addition, subsequent in vitro studies found that eosinophils could directly kill MCA-induced fibrosarcoma cells. Collectively, our data support a potential role for the eosinophil as an effector cell in tumor immune surveillance...
  38. doi request reprint Heparanase in primary human osteoblasts
    Paul N Smith
    Medical School, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    J Orthop Res 28:1315-22. 2010
    ..HPSE upregulation may be a novel therapeutic approach in the prevention and treatment of OP...
  39. doi request reprint Alternatively activated macrophage possess antitumor cytotoxicity that is induced by IL-4 and mediated by arginase-1
    Julia I Ellyard
    Cancer and Vascular Biology Group, Division of Immunology and Genetics, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University daggerCancer Immunotherapy Group, Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Applied Science, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia
    J Immunother 33:443-52. 2010
    ..This highlights the fine balance between stimulating the antitumorigenic and protumorigenic properties of aaMacs in tumor immunotherapy protocols...
  40. doi request reprint Histidine-rich glycoprotein functions cooperatively with cell surface heparan sulfate on phagocytes to promote necrotic cell uptake
    Ivan K H Poon
    Department of Immunology, The John Curtain School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Bldg 131, Garran Rd, Acton, Canberra, ACT 0200 Australia
    J Leukoc Biol 88:559-69. 2010
    ..Thus, these data suggest that HRG can aid the phagocytosis of necrotic cells via a HS-dependent pathway, and this process can be regulated by the presence of certain HRG ligands, such as heparin...
  41. ncbi request reprint Histidine-rich glycoprotein specifically binds to necrotic cells via its amino-terminal domain and facilitates necrotic cell phagocytosis
    Allison L Jones
    Cancer and Vascular Biology Group, Division of Immunology and Genetics, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, 0200, Australia
    J Biol Chem 280:35733-41. 2005
    ..Thus, HRG has the unique property of selectively recognizing necrotic cells and may play an important physiological role in vivo by facilitating the uptake and clearance of necrotic, but not apoptotic, cells by phagocytes...
  42. ncbi request reprint Use of sulfated linked cyclitols as heparan sulfate mimetics to probe the heparin/heparan sulfate binding specificity of proteins
    Craig Freeman
    Division of Immunology and Genetics, John Curtin School of Medical Research and Research School of Chemistry, PO Box 334, Australian National University, Canberra 2601, Australian Capital Territory
    J Biol Chem 280:8842-9. 2005
    ..These data indicate that a simple panel of HS mimetics can be used to probe the HS binding specificity of proteins, with the position of anionic groups in the HS mimetics being critical...
  43. doi request reprint Use of the intracellular fluorescent dye CFSE to monitor lymphocyte migration and proliferation
    Christopher R Parish
    Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    Curr Protoc Immunol . 2009
    ....
  44. doi request reprint Reversal of the glycolytic phenotype by dichloroacetate inhibits metastatic breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo
    Ramon C Sun
    Molecular Genetics Group, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, P O Box 334, Canberra, 2601, Australia
    Breast Cancer Res Treat 120:253-60. 2010
    ..These results demonstrate that DCA has anti-proliferative properties in addition to pro-apoptotic properties, and can be effective against highly metastatic disease in vivo, highlighting its potential for clinical use...
  45. pmc Bystander B cells rapidly acquire antigen receptors from activated B cells by membrane transfer
    Ben J C Quah
    Divisions of Immunology and Genetics and Molecular Bioscience, The John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:4259-64. 2008
    ..This results in a dramatic expansion in the number of antigen-binding B cells in vivo, with the transferred BCR endowing recipient B cells with the ability to present a specific antigen to antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells...
  46. ncbi request reprint Monitoring lymphocyte proliferation in vitro and in vivo with the intracellular fluorescent dye carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester
    Ben J C Quah
    Division of Immunology and Genetics, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
    Nat Protoc 2:2049-56. 2007
    ..An important feature of the technique is that division-dependent changes in the expression of cell-surface markers and intracellular proteins are easily quantified by flow cytometry...
  47. ncbi request reprint Blockade of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and intimal thickening after balloon injury by the sulfated oligosaccharide PI-88: phosphomannopentaose sulfate directly binds FGF-2, blocks cellular signaling, and inhibits proliferation
    Douglas J Francis
    Division of Immunology and Genetics, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    Circ Res 92:e70-7. 2003
    ..As such, this study demonstrates a new role for PI-88 as an inhibitor of intimal thickening after balloon angioplasty. The full text of this article is available online at http://www.circresaha.org...
  48. pmc Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum growth in vitro and adhesion to chondroitin-4-sulfate by the heparan sulfate mimetic PI-88 and other sulfated oligosaccharides
    Yvonne Adams
    Hygiene Institut, Abteilung Parasigologie, Universitat Heidelberg, Germany
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 50:2850-2. 2006
    ..4 microM) and demonstrated modest adhesion inhibition to cell surface CSA...
  49. ncbi request reprint Heparan sulfate and inflammation
    Christopher R Parish
    Nat Immunol 6:861-2. 2005
  50. ncbi request reprint A functional heparan sulfate mimetic implicates both heparanase and heparan sulfate in tumor angiogenesis and invasion in a mouse model of multistage cancer
    Johanna A Joyce
    Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Diabetes and Comprehensive Cancer Centers, University of California at San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143 0534, USA
    Oncogene 24:4037-51. 2005
    ..These data encourage clinical applications of inhibitors such as PI-88 for the many human cancers where heparanase expression is elevated or mobilization of HS-binding regulatory factors is implicated...
  51. ncbi request reprint The low molecular weight heparan sulfate-mimetic, PI-88, inhibits cell-to-cell spread of herpes simplex virus
    Kicki Nyberg
    Department of Clinical Virology, Goteborg University, Guldhedsgatan 10B, S 413 46 Goteborg, Sweden
    Antiviral Res 63:15-24. 2004
    ..The latter was efficiently inhibited by a relatively small but densely sulfated PI-88 oligosaccharide, very likely due to the capability of the compound to access the narrow intercellular space...
  52. ncbi request reprint Phosphomannopentaose sulfate (PI-88): heparan sulfate mimetic with clinical potential in multiple vascular pathologies
    Levon M Khachigian
    Centre for Vascular Research, Department of Pathology, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052, Australia
    Cardiovasc Drug Rev 22:1-6. 2004
    ..This heparan sulfate mimetic has, therefore, multiple functions and therapeutic potential in a variety of vascular disorders...