Adrienne B Nicotra

Summary

Affiliation: Australian National University
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Plant phenotypic plasticity in a changing climate
    A B Nicotra
    Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia
    Trends Plant Sci 15:684-92. 2010
  2. ncbi request reprint Geographic variation and plasticity to water and nutrients in Pelargonium australe
    Adrienne B Nicotra
    School of Botany and Zoology, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    New Phytol 176:136-49. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint Leaf shape linked to photosynthetic rates and temperature optima in South African Pelargonium species
    A B Nicotra
    School of Botany and Zoology, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    Oecologia 154:625-35. 2008
  4. doi request reprint The host bias of three epiphytic Aeridinae orchid species is reflected, but not explained, by mycorrhizal fungal associations
    Kelli M Gowland
    Research School of Biology, Building 116, Daley Road, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    Am J Bot 100:764-77. 2013
  5. doi request reprint Soil warming increases plant species richness but decreases germination from the alpine soil seed bank
    Gemma L Hoyle
    Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    Glob Chang Biol 19:1549-61. 2013
  6. pmc The impact of beneficial plant-associated microbes on plant phenotypic plasticity
    Chooi Hua Goh
    Department of Plant Science, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, 0200, Australia
    J Chem Ecol 39:826-39. 2013
  7. doi request reprint Significant phorophyte (substrate) bias is not explained by fitness benefits in three epiphytic orchid species
    Kelli M Gowland
    Division of Evolution, Ecology and Genetics, Research School of Biology, Bldg 116, Daley Road, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    Am J Bot 98:197-206. 2011
  8. doi request reprint Nitrogen in cell walls of sclerophyllous leaves accounts for little of the variation in photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency
    Matthew T Harrison
    Research School of Biological Sciences, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
    Plant Cell Environ 32:259-70. 2009
  9. doi request reprint Do invasive species show higher phenotypic plasticity than native species and, if so, is it adaptive? A meta-analysis
    Amy Michelle Davidson
    Research School of Biology, Australian National University, Acton, ACT 0200, Australia
    Ecol Lett 14:419-31. 2011
  10. pmc Population structure and diversity in sexual and asexual populations of the pathogenic fungus Melampsora lini
    Luke G Barrett
    CSIRO Plant Industry, GPO Box 1600, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
    Mol Ecol 17:3401-15. 2008

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications12

  1. doi request reprint Plant phenotypic plasticity in a changing climate
    A B Nicotra
    Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia
    Trends Plant Sci 15:684-92. 2010
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint Geographic variation and plasticity to water and nutrients in Pelargonium australe
    Adrienne B Nicotra
    School of Botany and Zoology, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    New Phytol 176:136-49. 2007
    ..Pelargonium arrived in Australia approximately 5 million yr ago. It is concluded here that high amounts of plasticity, in some cases adaptive, and weak integration among traits may be key to the spread and success of this species...
  3. ncbi request reprint Leaf shape linked to photosynthetic rates and temperature optima in South African Pelargonium species
    A B Nicotra
    School of Botany and Zoology, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    Oecologia 154:625-35. 2008
    ..Higher thermal optima, in conjunction with leaf dissection, may reflect selection pressure to protect photosynthetic machinery against excessive leaf temperatures when stomata close in response to water stress...
  4. doi request reprint The host bias of three epiphytic Aeridinae orchid species is reflected, but not explained, by mycorrhizal fungal associations
    Kelli M Gowland
    Research School of Biology, Building 116, Daley Road, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    Am J Bot 100:764-77. 2013
    ..Therefore, we predicted that the host specialization of these orchid species is a consequence of a bias toward particular orchid mycorrhizal fungi, which are in turn biased toward particular woody plant species...
  5. doi request reprint Soil warming increases plant species richness but decreases germination from the alpine soil seed bank
    Gemma L Hoyle
    Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    Glob Chang Biol 19:1549-61. 2013
    ..Implications for alpine management and areas for further study are also discussed...
  6. pmc The impact of beneficial plant-associated microbes on plant phenotypic plasticity
    Chooi Hua Goh
    Department of Plant Science, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, 0200, Australia
    J Chem Ecol 39:826-39. 2013
    ....
  7. doi request reprint Significant phorophyte (substrate) bias is not explained by fitness benefits in three epiphytic orchid species
    Kelli M Gowland
    Division of Evolution, Ecology and Genetics, Research School of Biology, Bldg 116, Daley Road, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    Am J Bot 98:197-206. 2011
    ..Previous studies have proposed a degree of specificity in both interactions. Epiphytic orchids therefore provide an interesting system in which to examine multispecies interactions and the evolution of specialization...
  8. doi request reprint Nitrogen in cell walls of sclerophyllous leaves accounts for little of the variation in photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency
    Matthew T Harrison
    Research School of Biological Sciences, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
    Plant Cell Environ 32:259-70. 2009
    ..5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Variation in photosynthetic rate per unit nitrogen could not be explained by variation in cell wall nitrogen...
  9. doi request reprint Do invasive species show higher phenotypic plasticity than native species and, if so, is it adaptive? A meta-analysis
    Amy Michelle Davidson
    Research School of Biology, Australian National University, Acton, ACT 0200, Australia
    Ecol Lett 14:419-31. 2011
    ....
  10. pmc Population structure and diversity in sexual and asexual populations of the pathogenic fungus Melampsora lini
    Luke G Barrett
    CSIRO Plant Industry, GPO Box 1600, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
    Mol Ecol 17:3401-15. 2008
    ..Together these results illustrate the important roles of reproductive modes and geographical structure in the generation and maintenance of virulence diversity in populations of M. lini...
  11. ncbi request reprint Compensation for herbivory by Cucumis sativus through increased photosynthetic capacity and efficiency
    Vivien P Thomson
    Botany and Zoology, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    Oecologia 134:167-75. 2003
    ..Herbivore-damaged plants may be induced to use a greater proportion of the absorbed light energy for photosynthesis as a result of altered carbohydrate source-sink relationships...
  12. ncbi request reprint Dynamics of stomatal water relations following leaf excision
    Julia E Powles
    Environmental Biology Group and Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Accounting, Research School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Advanced Studies, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601 Australia
    Plant Cell Environ 29:981-92. 2006
    ..We discuss the implications of our results for the mechanism of short-term stomatal responses to hydraulic perturbations, for dynamic modelling of gs and for leaf water status regulation...