M D Jennions

Summary

Affiliation: Australian National University
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. pmc Relationships fade with time: a meta-analysis of temporal trends in publication in ecology and evolution
    Michael D Jennions
    School of Botany and Zoology, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 269:43-8. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint Sexually selected traits and adult survival: a meta-analysis
    M D Jennions
    Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Unit 0948 APO AA 34002 0948 USA
    Q Rev Biol 76:3-36. 2001
  3. ncbi request reprint Publication bias in ecology and evolution: an empirical assessment using the 'trim and fill' method
    Michael D Jennions
    School of Botany and Zoology, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 77:211-22. 2002
  4. ncbi request reprint No evidence for inbreeding avoidance through postcopulatory mechanisms in the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus
    Michael D Jennions
    School of Botany and Zoology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200, Australia
    Evolution 58:2472-7. 2004
  5. doi request reprint Inbreeding and courtship calling in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus
    J M Drayton
    Evolution, Ecology and Genetics, Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia
    J Evol Biol 24:47-58. 2011
  6. ncbi request reprint Do female black field crickets Teleogryllus commodus benefit from polyandry?
    M D Jennions
    School of Botany and Zoology, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia
    J Evol Biol 20:1469-77. 2007
  7. ncbi request reprint Mate recognition in a freshwater fish: geographical distance, genetic differentiation, and variation in female preference for local over foreign males
    B B M Wong
    School of Botany and Zoology, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    J Evol Biol 17:701-8. 2004
  8. ncbi request reprint The h index and career assessment by numbers
    Clint D Kelly
    School of Botany and Zoology, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    Trends Ecol Evol 21:167-70. 2006
  9. pmc Females prefer to associate with males with longer intromittent organs in mosquitofish
    Andrew T Kahn
    Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200, Australia
    Biol Lett 6:55-8. 2010
  10. pmc Safe sex: male-female coalitions and pre-copulatory mate-guarding in a fiddler crab
    Richard N C Milner
    Evolution, Ecology and Genetics, Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200, Australia
    Biol Lett 6:180-2. 2010

Detail Information

Publications36

  1. pmc Relationships fade with time: a meta-analysis of temporal trends in publication in ecology and evolution
    Michael D Jennions
    School of Botany and Zoology, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 269:43-8. 2002
    ..As in the medical sciences, non-significant results may take longer to publish and studies with both small sample sizes and non-significant results may be less likely to be published...
  2. ncbi request reprint Sexually selected traits and adult survival: a meta-analysis
    M D Jennions
    Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Unit 0948 APO AA 34002 0948 USA
    Q Rev Biol 76:3-36. 2001
    ..Hence, many secondary sexual characters are likely to be condition dependent in their expression...
  3. ncbi request reprint Publication bias in ecology and evolution: an empirical assessment using the 'trim and fill' method
    Michael D Jennions
    School of Botany and Zoology, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 77:211-22. 2002
    ..We suggest that future literature reviews assess the robustness of their main conclusions by correcting for potential publication bias using the 'trim and fill' method...
  4. ncbi request reprint No evidence for inbreeding avoidance through postcopulatory mechanisms in the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus
    Michael D Jennions
    School of Botany and Zoology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200, Australia
    Evolution 58:2472-7. 2004
    ..Although polyandry may confer indirect genetic benefits, our results provide no evidence that female T. commodus gain these benefits by biasing paternity toward genetically more compatible males through postcopulatory mechanisms...
  5. doi request reprint Inbreeding and courtship calling in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus
    J M Drayton
    Evolution, Ecology and Genetics, Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia
    J Evol Biol 24:47-58. 2011
    ..It might, however, signal components of male fitness that are not affected by changes in heterozygosity...
  6. ncbi request reprint Do female black field crickets Teleogryllus commodus benefit from polyandry?
    M D Jennions
    School of Botany and Zoology, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia
    J Evol Biol 20:1469-77. 2007
    ..Finally, after controlling for relative male size, monandrous females' sons were more successful when directly competing for a mate...
  7. ncbi request reprint Mate recognition in a freshwater fish: geographical distance, genetic differentiation, and variation in female preference for local over foreign males
    B B M Wong
    School of Botany and Zoology, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    J Evol Biol 17:701-8. 2004
    ..Our results suggest that female preference for local over foreign males in blue-eyes may depend on how genetically and geographically separated populations are from one another...
  8. ncbi request reprint The h index and career assessment by numbers
    Clint D Kelly
    School of Botany and Zoology, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    Trends Ecol Evol 21:167-70. 2006
    ..We suggest that h is not obviously superior to other indices that rely on citations and publication counts to assess research performance...
  9. pmc Females prefer to associate with males with longer intromittent organs in mosquitofish
    Andrew T Kahn
    Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200, Australia
    Biol Lett 6:55-8. 2010
    ..This preference was, however, only expressed when females chose between two large males; for small males, there was no effect of genital size on female association time...
  10. pmc Safe sex: male-female coalitions and pre-copulatory mate-guarding in a fiddler crab
    Richard N C Milner
    Evolution, Ecology and Genetics, Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200, Australia
    Biol Lett 6:180-2. 2010
    ..Males who ensure that their neighbour remains female could benefit through increased opportunity for future reproductive success and lower boundary maintenance costs...
  11. pmc Eavesdropping in crabs: an agency for lady detection
    Richard N C Milner
    The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    Biol Lett 6:755-7. 2010
    ..Furthermore, males appear to adjust their waving according to the information available: eavesdropping males wave 12 times faster than non-courting males but only 1.7 times slower than males in full visual contact with the female...
  12. pmc Interspecific assistance: fiddler crabs help heterospecific neighbours in territory defence
    Isobel Booksmythe
    The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
    Biol Lett 6:748-50. 2010
    ..elegans neighbour during simulated intrusions by intermediate sized U. elegans males (50% of cases for both). Helping was, however, significantly less likely to occur when the intruder was a U. mjoebergi male (only 15% of cases)...
  13. doi request reprint Inbreeding and advertisement calling in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus: laboratory and field experiments
    Jean M Drayton
    Evolution, Ecology and Genetics, Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia
    Evolution 64:3069-83. 2010
    ..commodus prefer males with a higher calling effort, inbred males will suffer reductions in mating success. Females who base mate choice on call rate are therefore using a signal correlated with male heterozygosity and/or condition...
  14. ncbi request reprint Animal behaviour: coalition among male fiddler crabs
    Patricia R Y Backwell
    School of Botany and Zoology, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, Australia
    Nature 430:417. 2004
    ..This cooperation supports the prediction that it is sometimes less costly to assist a familiar neighbour than to renegotiate boundaries with a new, and possibly stronger, neighbour...
  15. pmc Costs influence male mate choice in a freshwater fish
    Bob B M Wong
    School of Botany and Zoology, Australian National University, Canberra, 0200 ACT, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 270:S36-8. 2003
    ..Our results suggest that males may also respond adaptively to changes in the costs of choosing...
  16. ncbi request reprint Post-mating sexual selection increases lifetime fitness of polyandrous females in the wild
    Diana O Fisher
    School of Botany and Zoology, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200, Australia
    Nature 444:89-92. 2006
    ..The threefold increase in offspring survival is not negated by a decline in maternal lifespan and is too large to be offset by an equivalent decline in the reproductive performance of surviving offspring...
  17. pmc What factors contribute to an ownership advantage?
    S A Fayed
    School of Botany and Zoology, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200, Australia
    Biol Lett 4:143-5. 2008
    ..There was, however, a significant effect due to the mechanical advantage the owner gained through access to the burrow during fights (r=0.48, p<0.005)...
  18. doi request reprint When and why do territorial coalitions occur? Experimental evidence from a fiddler crab
    Tanya Detto
    Evolution, Ecology and Genetics, Research School of Biology, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200, Australia
    Am Nat 175:E119-25. 2010
    ..Using simple experiments, we provide the first evidence of the rules determining when territorial coalitions form. Our results support recent models that suggest that these coalitions arise from by-product mutualism...
  19. doi request reprint The opportunity to be misled in studies of sexual selection
    M D Jennions
    Ecology, Evolution and Genetics, Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia
    J Evol Biol 25:591-8. 2012
    ..We hope that our worked example will clarify a recent debate about how best to measure sexual selection...
  20. ncbi request reprint Sounds different: inbreeding depression in sexually selected traits in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus
    J M Drayton
    School of Botany and Zoology, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia
    J Evol Biol 20:1138-47. 2007
    ..Sexually selected traits clearly vary in their susceptibility to inbreeding depression...
  21. pmc What are the consequences of being left-clawed in a predominantly right-clawed fiddler crab?
    P R Y Backwell
    School of Botany and Zoology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200, Australia
    Proc Biol Sci 274:2723-9. 2007
    ..The low-level persistence of left-clawed males is therefore unlikely to involve a frequency-dependent advantage associated with fighting experience...
  22. doi request reprint Sexual selection: the weevils of inbreeding
    Isobel Booksmythe
    Evolution, Ecology and Genetics, Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, Australia
    Curr Biol 20:R672-3. 2010
    ..A recent study has used inbreeding depression to gain insight into the maintenance of additive genetic variation in populations, with intriguing implications for good genes models of sexual selection...
  23. ncbi request reprint Experimental evidence for multivariate stabilizing sexual selection
    Robert Brooks
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
    Evolution 59:871-80. 2005
    ..These experiments indicate that stabilizing sexual selection may play an important role in the evolution of male call properties in natural populations of T. commodus...
  24. ncbi request reprint High-quality male field crickets invest heavily in sexual display but die young
    John Hunt
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, 2052, Australia
    Nature 432:1024-7. 2004
    ..Moreover, they caution the use of longevity as a proxy for fitness in sexual selection studies, and suggest avenues for future research on the relationship between sexual attractiveness and ageing...
  25. ncbi request reprint Sexual conflict and cryptic female choice in the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus
    Luc F Bussière
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia
    Evolution 60:792-800. 2006
    ..Our results suggest that postcopulatory mate guarding has evolved via sexual conflict over insemination times rather than through genetic benefits of biasing paternity toward vigorous males, as has been previously suggested...
  26. pmc Reconciling strong stabilizing selection with the maintenance of genetic variation in a natural population of black field crickets (Teleogryllus commodus)
    John Hunt
    Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Kensington, Sydney 2052, Australia
    Genetics 177:875-80. 2007
    ....
  27. ncbi request reprint Artificial selection on male longevity influences age-dependent reproductive effort in the black field cricket Teleogryllus commodus
    John Hunt
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia
    Am Nat 168:E72-86. 2006
    ..Collectively, our findings directly support the antagonistic pleiotropy model of aging and suggest an important role for sexual selection in the aging process...
  28. ncbi request reprint Female mate choice as a condition-dependent life-history trait
    John Hunt
    School of Biological, Earth, and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia
    Am Nat 166:79-92. 2005
    ..Collectively, our findings suggest an important role for resource acquisition in generating variation in mate choice behavior...
  29. pmc The evolution of mate choice and mating biases
    Hanna Kokko
    Department of Biological and Environmental Science, University of Jyvaskyla, PO Box 35, FIN 40014 Jyvaskyla, Finland
    Proc Biol Sci 270:653-64. 2003
    ..Finally, we suggest potentially fruitful directions for future theoretical and empirical research...
  30. pmc The indirect benefits of mating with attractive males outweigh the direct costs
    Megan L Head
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
    PLoS Biol 3:e33. 2005
    ..They also reveal the value of estimating the net fitness consequences of a mating strategy by including measures of offspring quality in estimates of fitness...
  31. ncbi request reprint Complex multivariate sexual selection on male acoustic signaling in a wild population of Teleogryllus commodus
    Caroline L Bentsen
    School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia
    Am Nat 167:E102-16. 2006
    ..We discuss the general importance of nonlinear selection in the honest signaling of genetic quality...
  32. ncbi request reprint Debating sexual selection and mating strategies
    Tommaso Pizzari
    Science 312:689-97; author reply 689-97. 2006
  33. doi request reprint Sexual conflict: the battle of the sexes reversed
    Hanna Kokko
    Laboratory of Ecological and Evolutionary Dynamics, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, PO Box 65, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland
    Curr Biol 18:R121-3. 2008
    ..In most species one sex is more reluctant to mate than the other. Standard explanations invoking potential reproductive rates have shortcomings that are illustrated by a new study of eager female and reluctant male antelopes...
  34. doi request reprint Experiments with robots explain synchronized courtship in fiddler crabs
    Leeann T Reaney
    Curr Biol 18:R62-3. 2008
  35. ncbi request reprint Mate choice for genetic quality when environments vary: suggestions for empirical progress
    Luc F Bussière
    Zoologisches Museum der Universität Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, Zurich, Switzerland
    Genetica 134:69-78. 2008
    ..in condition? (3) How much do GEIs reduce the signalling value of male condition? (4) How does GEI affect the multivariate version of the lek paradox? (5) Have mating biases for high-condition males evolved because of indirect benefits?..
  36. pmc Evolution of frequency-dependent mate choice: keeping up with fashion trends
    Hanna Kokko
    Laboratory of Ecological and Evolutionary Dynamics, Department of Biological and Environmental Science, University of Helsinki, PO Box 65 Viikinkaari 1, 00014 Helsinki, Finland
    Proc Biol Sci 274:1317-24. 2007
    ....