C J Gore

Summary

Affiliation: Australian Institute of Sport
Country: Australia

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Increased arterial desaturation in trained cyclists during maximal exercise at 580 m altitude
    C J Gore
    Australian Institute of Sport, Adelaide, Henley Beach, Australia
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 80:2204-10. 1996
  2. ncbi request reprint Automated VO2max calibrator for open-circuit indirect calorimetry systems
    C J Gore
    Australian Institute of Sport Adelaide, Henley Beach, Australia
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 29:1095-103. 1997
  3. ncbi request reprint VO2max and haemoglobin mass of trained athletes during high intensity training
    C J Gore
    Australian Institute of Sport, Adelaide, South Australia
    Int J Sports Med 18:477-82. 1997
  4. ncbi request reprint Utility of pwc75% as an estimate of aerobic power in epidemiological and population-based studies
    C J Gore
    Australian Institute of Sport Adelaide, Henley Beach SA
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 31:348-51. 1999
  5. doi request reprint Preparation for football competition at moderate to high altitude
    C J Gore
    Department of Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport, Canberra, Australia
    Scand J Med Sci Sports 18:85-95. 2008
  6. ncbi request reprint A novel method utilising markers of altered erythropoiesis for the detection of recombinant human erythropoietin abuse in athletes
    R Parisotto
    Department of Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport, P O Box 176, Belconnen ACT 2616, Australia
    Haematologica 85:564-72. 2000
  7. ncbi request reprint Live high:train low increases muscle buffer capacity and submaximal cycling efficiency
    C J Gore
    Australian Institute of Sport, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
    Acta Physiol Scand 173:275-86. 2001
  8. ncbi request reprint An evaluation of the concept of living at moderate altitude and training at sea level
    A G Hahn
    Department of Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport, P O Box 176, ACT 2616, Belconnen, Australia
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 128:777-89. 2001
  9. ncbi request reprint Simulated moderate altitude elevates serum erythropoietin but does not increase reticulocyte production in well-trained runners
    M J Ashenden
    Department of Physiology and Applied Nutrition, Australian Institute of Sport, Belconnen, Canberra
    Eur J Appl Physiol 81:428-35. 2000
  10. doi request reprint Spurious Hb mass increases following exercise
    C E Gough
    Australian Institute of Sport, Physiology, Canberra, Australia
    Int J Sports Med 33:691-5. 2012

Detail Information

Publications30

  1. ncbi request reprint Increased arterial desaturation in trained cyclists during maximal exercise at 580 m altitude
    C J Gore
    Australian Institute of Sport, Adelaide, Henley Beach, Australia
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 80:2204-10. 1996
    ..5%; range, + 1.2 to - 12.3%), with approximately 70% of this decrease being due to a fall in O2 content. This is the lowest altitude reported to decrease VO2max, suggesting that T athletes are more susceptible to a fall in inspired PO2...
  2. ncbi request reprint Automated VO2max calibrator for open-circuit indirect calorimetry systems
    C J Gore
    Australian Institute of Sport Adelaide, Henley Beach, Australia
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 29:1095-103. 1997
    ..This VO2max calibrator is a versatile device that can be used for routine calibration of most indirect calorimetry systems that assess the ventilation and aerobic power of athletes...
  3. ncbi request reprint VO2max and haemoglobin mass of trained athletes during high intensity training
    C J Gore
    Australian Institute of Sport, Adelaide, South Australia
    Int J Sports Med 18:477-82. 1997
    ..It is concluded that trained athletes with erythrocythemic hypervolemia have limited capability to increase further either total red cell volume or Hb mass...
  4. ncbi request reprint Utility of pwc75% as an estimate of aerobic power in epidemiological and population-based studies
    C J Gore
    Australian Institute of Sport Adelaide, Henley Beach SA
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 31:348-51. 1999
    ..On a population basis, interpolated measures of pwc may provide the same information and avoid the errors associated with extrapolated measures...
  5. doi request reprint Preparation for football competition at moderate to high altitude
    C J Gore
    Department of Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport, Canberra, Australia
    Scand J Med Sci Sports 18:85-95. 2008
    ..Preparing for 1-2 weeks at moderate/high altitude is a reasonable compromise between the benefits associated with overcoming AMS and partial restoration of VO2max vs the likelihood of detraining...
  6. ncbi request reprint A novel method utilising markers of altered erythropoiesis for the detection of recombinant human erythropoietin abuse in athletes
    R Parisotto
    Department of Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport, P O Box 176, Belconnen ACT 2616, Australia
    Haematologica 85:564-72. 2000
    ..Existing tests cannot readily differentiate between exogenous and endogenous EPO. Therefore the aim of our study was to investigate possible indirect detection of r-HuEPO use via blood markers of altered erythropoiesis...
  7. ncbi request reprint Live high:train low increases muscle buffer capacity and submaximal cycling efficiency
    C J Gore
    Australian Institute of Sport, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
    Acta Physiol Scand 173:275-86. 2001
    ..This is the first study to show that hypoxic exposure, per se, increases muscle buffer capacity. Further, reduced VO2 during normoxic exercise after LHTL suggests that improved exercise efficiency is a fundamental adaptation to LHTL...
  8. ncbi request reprint An evaluation of the concept of living at moderate altitude and training at sea level
    A G Hahn
    Department of Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport, P O Box 176, ACT 2616, Belconnen, Australia
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 128:777-89. 2001
    ..13 for group x time interaction). We conclude that sleeping in moderate hypoxia (2650-3000 m) for up to 23 days may offer practical benefit to elite athletes, but that any effect is not likely due to increased Hb(mass) or VO2max...
  9. ncbi request reprint Simulated moderate altitude elevates serum erythropoietin but does not increase reticulocyte production in well-trained runners
    M J Ashenden
    Department of Physiology and Applied Nutrition, Australian Institute of Sport, Belconnen, Canberra
    Eur J Appl Physiol 81:428-35. 2000
    ..We conclude that when daily training loads are controlled, the modest increases in sEpo known to occur following brief exposure to a simulated altitude of 2650 m are insufficient to stimulate reticulocyte production...
  10. doi request reprint Spurious Hb mass increases following exercise
    C E Gough
    Australian Institute of Sport, Physiology, Canberra, Australia
    Int J Sports Med 33:691-5. 2012
    ..Ultra-endurance triathlon racing may confound the accuracy of post-exercise Hb(mass) measures, possibly due to splenic contraction or an increased rate of CO diffusion to intramuscular myoglobin...
  11. ncbi request reprint Effects of a 12-day "live high, train low" camp on reticulocyte production and haemoglobin mass in elite female road cyclists
    M J Ashenden
    Department of Physiology and Applied Nutrition, Australian Institute of Sport, PO Box 176, Belconnen ACT 2616, Canberra, Australia
    Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol 80:472-8. 1999
    ..We conclude that in elite female road cyclists, 12 nights of exposure to normobaric hypoxia (2650 m) is not sufficient to either stimulate reticulocyte production or increase haemoglobin mass...
  12. ncbi request reprint Sleep in athletes undertaking protocols of exposure to nocturnal simulated altitude at 2650 m
    T A Kinsman
    Department of Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport Canberra, Australia
    J Sci Med Sport 8:222-32. 2005
    ..03) and N15 (p=0.01). Overall, sleeping at 2650 m causes sleep disturbance in susceptible athletes, yet there was some improvement in REM sleep over the study duration...
  13. ncbi request reprint Arterial hypoxaemia in endurance athletes is greater during running than cycling
    A J Rice
    Department of Thoracic Medicine, Royal Adelaide Hospital, 275 North Terrace, Adelaide, SA, Australia
    Respir Physiol 123:235-46. 2000
    ..It is concluded that the greater EIH with treadmill running is a consequence of the combined effect of a reduced lactic acidosis-induced hyperventilation and greater ventilation-perfusion inequality with this exercise mode...
  14. ncbi request reprint The effect of altitude on cycling performance: a challenge to traditional concepts
    A G Hahn
    Department of Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport, Canberra
    Sports Med 31:533-57. 2001
    ..If this benefit does exist, it probably varies between individuals and averages little more than 1%...
  15. ncbi request reprint The effects of injury and illness on haemoglobin mass
    C E Gough
    Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport, Canberra, Australia
    Int J Sports Med 34:763-9. 2013
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Improved running economy and increased hemoglobin mass in elite runners after extended moderate altitude exposure
    P U Saunders
    Department of Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport, Australia
    J Sci Med Sport 12:67-72. 2009
    ..Although total O(2) carrying capacity was improved, the mechanism(s) to explain the lack of proportionate increase in V(O)(2max) were not identified...
  17. ncbi request reprint "Live high, train low" does not change the total haemoglobin mass of male endurance athletes sleeping at a simulated altitude of 3000 m for 23 nights
    M J Ashenden
    Department of Physiology and Applied Nutrition, Australian Institute of Sport, PO Box 176, Belconnen, ACT 2616, Canberra, Australia
    Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol 80:479-84. 1999
    ..We conclude that red blood cell production is not stimulated in male endurance athletes who spend 23 nights at a simulated altitude of 3000 m...
  18. doi request reprint Time course of haemoglobin mass during 21 days live high:train low simulated altitude
    Sally A Clark
    Department of Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport, PO Box 176, Belconnen, ACT, 2616, Australia
    Eur J Appl Physiol 106:399-406. 2009
    ..04, P = 0.89) between the increase in sEPO and the increase in Hb(mass). Athletes seeking to gain erythropoietic benefits from moderate altitude need to spend >12 h/day in hypoxia...
  19. doi request reprint No change in hemoglobin mass after 40 days of physical activity in previously untrained adults
    A Eastwood
    Sport Science Unit, South Australian Sports Institute, Adelaide, Australia
    Scand J Med Sci Sports 22:722-8. 2012
    ..Our results support the concept of relative stability in Hb(mass) with approximately 1 month of moderate-intensity physical activity suggesting that Hb(mass) may be used for talent identification and possibly for anti-doping purposes...
  20. doi request reprint Detraining decreases Hb(mass) of triathletes
    A Eastwood
    South Australian Sports Institute, Sport Science, Adelaide, Australia
    Int J Sports Med 33:253-7. 2012
    ..1±6.4 to 77.1±6.1 kg and a 28% increase in skinfold total from 43.9±14.2 to 55.1±14.0 mm. Individual decreases in Hbmass following detraining would need to be considered if using Hbmass for anti-doping purposes...
  21. ncbi request reprint Detection of recombinant human erythropoietin abuse in athletes utilizing markers of altered erythropoiesis
    R Parisotto
    Department of Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport, P O Box 176, Belconnen ACT 2616, Australia
    Haematologica 86:128-37. 2001
    ..A final aim was to verify that the hematologic response to r-HuEPO did not differ between Caucasian and Asiatic subjects...
  22. ncbi request reprint Improved running economy in elite runners after 20 days of simulated moderate-altitude exposure
    P U Saunders
    Department of Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport, Belconnen, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
    J Appl Physiol 96:931-7. 2004
    ..We conclude that 20 days of LHTL at simulated altitude improved the RE of elite distance runners...
  23. ncbi request reprint A comparison of the physiological response to simulated altitude exposure and r-HuEpo administration
    M J Ashenden
    Department of Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport, Belconnen, ACT
    J Sports Sci 19:831-7. 2001
    ....
  24. ncbi request reprint Skin-prick blood samples are reliable for estimating Hb mass with the CO-dilution technique
    M J Ashenden
    Department of Physiology and Applied Nutrition, Australian Institute of Sport, Canberra
    Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol 79:535-7. 1999
    ..9% reported previously with VEN samples. We conclude that using CAP samples gives a reliable measure of %HbCO, and will make the estimation of Hb mass with the CO-technique accessible to technicians without phlebotomy training...
  25. ncbi request reprint The effect of acute simulated moderate altitude on power, performance and pacing strategies in well-trained cyclists
    Sally A Clark
    Department of Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport, Canberra, ACT, Australia
    Eur J Appl Physiol 102:45-55. 2007
    ..In conclusion, during the 5-minTT there was a dose-response effect of hypoxia on both VO2peak and 5-minTT(power) but no effect on GE...
  26. ncbi request reprint Sleep quality responses to atmospheric variation: case studies of two elite female cyclists
    T A Kinsman
    Department of Physiology and Applied Nutrition, Australian Institute of Sport, Canberra, Australia
    J Sci Med Sport 6:436-42. 2003
    ..Only one cyclist clearly increased her REM sleep with O2 enrichment compared to mild altitude. Our data highlight two different sleep quality responses to atmospheric variation...
  27. doi request reprint Quality control technique to reduce the variability of longitudinal measurement of hemoglobin mass
    C E Gough
    Department of Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport, Belconnen, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
    Scand J Med Sci Sports 21:e365-71. 2011
    ..7%. The majority of between-laboratory variation in Hb(mass) originated from the difference between hemoximeters, which could be eliminated using appropriate quality controls...
  28. pmc Acute weight loss followed by an aggressive nutritional recovery strategy has little impact on on-water rowing performance
    G Slater
    Australian Institute of Sport, Canberra, ACT, Australia
    Br J Sports Med 40:55-9. 2006
    ..To assess the influence of moderate, acute weight loss on on-water rowing performance when aggressive nutritional recovery strategies were used in the two hours between weigh in and racing...
  29. ncbi request reprint Changes in performance, maximal oxygen uptake and maximal accumulated oxygen deficit after 5, 10 and 15 days of live high:train low altitude exposure
    A D Roberts
    Centre for Sports Studies, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
    Eur J Appl Physiol 88:390-5. 2003
    ..In these athletes, there was no difference in the impact of 5, 10 or 15 days of LHTL on the increases observed in MMPO(4min), .VO(2max) or MAOD; and LHTL increased MMPO(4min) and MAOD more than training at low altitude alone...
  30. ncbi request reprint Skinfold thickness varies directly with spring coefficient and inversely with jaw pressure
    C J Gore
    Australian Institute of Sport, Adelaide, SA
    Med Sci Sports Exerc 32:540-6. 2000
    ....